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2014 Iraq Conflict [Opinion & Analysis]

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Amirli entered its 53rd day under siege, continues to resist and stand up against ISIS. 15,000 Shiite residents of Amirli in Iraq under siege of death by ISIS terrorists   2014, 16 July 10:13 AM

  • News Code : 624316
  • Source : LUBP
 

A small town in Kirkuk Iraq with a population of 15000 residents, most of them are Shia Turkemen and Sufi Sunni, is surrounded by the Islamic State (IS/ISIS) Salafi Wahhabi militants vowing to kill every man, woman and child.

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A small town in Kirkuk Iraq with a population of 15000 residents, most of them are Shia Turkemen and Sufi Sunni, is surrounded by the Islamic State (IS/ISIS) Salafi Wahhabi militants vowing to kill  every man, woman and child.

This been their predicament for the past 35 days, water, food, medicine and gas are scarce. No one can get in or get out. There is no clear indication that the Iraqi government will do or can do anything about it. something has to be done.

The Western media seems complicit with Saudi Arabia and Qatar to keep this under the radar.

The international community has an enormous obligation to free these people under siege. The ISIS and Ba’thist groups threatening Amirli are directly or indirectly funded by Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey and other Gulf Monarchies under the supervision of CIA and M16.  Granted this was done for their political and strategic objectives in Syria against Assad regime. The innocent women and children of Amirli should not pay for this.

The Western powers must send in air power immediately to break this siege.

 

/129

http://www.abna.ir/english/service/middle-east-west-asia/archive/2014/07/16/624316/story.html

 

 

40 Yazidi children killed in Islamic State attack #IslamicState

The attack near the Syrian border comes as the Iraqi Prime Minister offers air support to Kurdish soldiers fighting the militant group

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Yazidis are condemned as "devil worshippers" by the Islamic State (AFP)
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Tuesday 5 August 2014 13:39 BST
Last update: 
Tuesday 5 August 2014 2:01 BST
  

Forty children from northern Iraq's Yazidi minority are reported to have died as a result of a militant attack on the Sinjar region, UNICEF said Tuesday.

"According to official reports received by UNICEF, these children from the Yazidi minority died as a direct consequence of violence, displacement and dehydration over the past two days," a statement from the agency said.

On Sunday, fighters from the Islamic State (IS) that controls much of northwestern Iraq captured Sinjar which had been under the control of Kurdish troops. Thousands of Iraqis - including Turkmens, Arabs and Yazidis - to fled the town, waiting in long queues to enter the Kurdish autonomous region’s capital, Erbil.

Near the Syrian border, the town had been a hub for Iraq's Yazidis, a closed community that follows an ancient faith rooted in Zoroastrianism and referred to by militants as "devil worshippers". Sinjar was also a temporary home for thousands of displaced people from other minorities, such as Shiite Turkmen who had fled the nearby city of Tal Afar when IS launched its offensive on 9 June.

Tuesday's attack on the children comes after Iraqi Kurdish leader Massoud Barzani commanded Peshmerga forces on Monday to "deal a death blow" against militants led by the Islamic State (IS) and the Iraqi government offered its air support, following several IS victories against the Peshmerga over the weekend. 

“Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has ordered that the Iraqi air force will support Peshmerga forces in any battles with IS,” army spokesman Lieutenant General Qasim Ata told state TV on Monday.

Barzani maintained on Monday that "terrorists" have forced Kurds into a war, despite the Kurdish region having maintained a defensive position after IS seized the city of Mosul in early June.

The Kurdish leader promised not to leave any acre of Kurdish land to militants and to protect Sinjar as well as the Yazidi people taking shelter there.

Barzani said the Peshmerga had been left alone in their "fight against terrorism" and called for a related international effort and initiative.

The European Union's Foreign and Security Policy Chief, Catherine Ashton, called on Monday for Baghdad and Erbil to urgently restore their security cooperation in order to confront IS.

Ongoing clashes

In other parts of the country on Tuesday, fresh clashes between Iraqi government forces and IS-led militant groups left 20 militants and two soldiers dead and another four wounded.

Ten militants and one soldier were killed in early morning battles between Iraqi security forces supported by warplanes and militants in the Turkmen-majority town of Amirli in Tikrit city, said the Salah ad din province operations command.

Six other militants and one Iraqi soldier were also killed in Tikrit's southern Rufayat region.

Separately, clashes in the Iraqi capital of Baghdad left four militants dead.

"Thirteen mortar shells have been capsized in Abu Gurayb region. We also seized scores of other weapons and ammunition," said a statement from Baghdad province operations command.

Militants led by IS and backed by tribal fighters, seized Iraq's second-largest city Mosul on 10 June and captured a number of other cities in the north, including Tikrit and Tal Afar.

They also reportedly control Al Qaim, Rawah, Anah, Al Ratba and Haditha in the western province of Al Anbar.

IS armed groups also extended their grip along Iraq’s Syrian and Jordanian border on Monday after taking control of border crossings, according to Farhan Ftikhan, the mayor of Al Qaim.

Around one million civilians have been displaced so far amid the ongoing clashes in the country.

- See more at: http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/forty-yazidi-children-are-killed-iraq-islamic-state-791716382#sthash.rdv42jfU.dpuf

 

 

 

 

POLICYWATCH 2285

Saving Iraqi Turkmens Is a Win-Win-Win

Michael Knights

Also available in العربية

July 16, 2014

 

A U.S.-backed effort to save besieged Iraqi Turkmens in the Tuz Khormatu district could bring Baghdad, the Kurds, and Turkey into a joint fight against the ongoing jihadist offensive.

In the battle for Iraq, the Islamic State (IS) continues to hold the initiative in its quest to establish a caliphate within the territory it controls in Iraq and Syria. In response, Baghdad and its allies need to quickly break the group's momentum and deflate its image -- and they can do so with a significant victory that involves as many allies as possible, demonstrating that the entire region is bandwagoning against the IS.

U.S. military intervention in Iraq's security crisis could be drawing closer as politicians in Baghdad tentatively move toward a more inclusive government under a new prime minister, and as U.S. assessment teams report back their initial findings on the status of Iraq's security forces. The next stage for U.S. planners may be to help Iraqi authorities craft a political-military campaign that can get the security forces back on their feet and win undecided Sunni tribes and militants over to the government's side in the fight against the IS, which until recently called itself the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). Turning the tide arguably depends on two factors:

  • Winning a clear victory. The shattered Iraqi security forces need an iconic victory, perhaps small in scale but well publicized. The military task should be relatively modest in order to maximize the chances of success, restore confidence to the security forces, and burst the bubble of ISIS/IS invincibility.
  • Bolstering national and international consensus. Ideally, the Iraqi security forces and their international partners will focus their early efforts on a battlefield away from the chaotic sectarian strife of Baghdad and its suburbs. Namely, a battlefield where the interests of the various coalition elements -- Shiite, Sunni, Kurdish, U.S., Turkish, and Iranian -- are in broad alignment.  

Relieving the desperate suffering of besieged Turkmen villages in Tuz Khormatu district -- an enclave roughly halfway between Baghdad and Mosul -- would appear to tick all of the above boxes (see map).

Tuz-close_900x649.jpg IRAQI TURKMEN ENCLAVE UNDER SIEGE, JULY 2014: Green areas represent federal government-held areas; black areas are insurgent-controlled areas; yellow areas are peshmerga-held. The blue area is the Turkmen enclave at Amerli. Baghdad lies 100 miles to the south, Tikrit 60 miles to the west, and Kirkuk 40 miles to the north. Click on map for larger view.   THE SIEGE

Northern Iraq's Turkmens are a Turkic-ethnicity, Turkish-speaking minority that includes Shiites and Sunnis alike. Shiite Turkmens, who comprise most of the large Shiite communities in the Sunni-majority north, have long been intensely targeted by ISIS/IS and its predecessors (al-Qaeda in Iraq, the Islamic State of Iraq). In mid-June, the group brutally drove over forty thousand of them from the Turkmen center of Tal Afar, west of Mosul. Days later, it massacred forty civilians in Bashir, a Turkmen town near Kirkuk, prompting Kurdish peshmerga fighters to move beyond their purely defensive positions in Kurdish areas to assist Turkmen militias.

A similar scene is now unfolding fifteen miles south of the Kurdish-held city of Tuz Khormatu, where the Islamic State is besieging a pocket of around twelve thousand Shiite Turkmen civilians in the Amerli subdistrict. The group has already captured outlying Turkmen villages such as Bastamil, Barochali, and Qara Naz, driving local families into the subdistrict center at Amerli. This center  was the scene of a massive al-Qaeda truck bombing on July 7, 2007, that killed 159 civilians and wounded over 350. Now it is being defended by around 400 local Turkmen armed volunteers. The Iraqi army has attempted to fight its way up the Udaim River Valley to make contact with the pocket, but its advance stalled twenty miles south at Udaim Dam. Meanwhile, the Iraqi air force is flying ammunition, vital medical supplies, and even baby formula into the pocket using unarmored helicopters, which are exposed to IS heavy machine gun and sniper fire. Almost a month into the siege, Turkmen residents of Amerli claim that 175 people have died, and there is widespread fear of a sectarian massacre if the defense fails, since they have no open line of retreat.

A FAVORABLE BATTLEGROUND

Supporting the Shiite Turkmens of Amerli could be the iconic fight that Iraq needs at this moment. The Shiite-led federal government is desperate to prevent another sectarian cleansing episode such as the one suffered at Tal Afar, which was too remote to save. In contrast, Amerli could be relieved if the Iraqi army receives timely support. Iran has ties to the Shiite communities around Amerli and could be counted on not to interfere with such an effort. Indeed, Tehran is already pressuring the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) to fight the IS more broadly, and an operation to relieve Amerli would fit into this effort. Further support would likely come from Turkey, which has gone to great lengths to support this particular Turkmen community in the past, flying air ambulances into Amerli following the 2007 bombing and evacuating the wounded to Turkey.

PUK fighters in the Tuz Khormatu area are likewise slowly being drawn into the local fight. When peshmerga prevented an IS car bombing against Shiite Turkmens in Tuz Khormatu city on June 19, the group responded by shelling and assaulting the nearby peshmerga checkpoint for four hours. The PUK has also facilitated the insertion of Turkmen militias into the Amerli pocket and blocked the path of IS oil-smuggling trucks in the area. Thirty miles to the southeast, an IS suicide bomber from Kazakhstan detonated a suicide vest at a peshmerga checkpoint on July 14, killing two fighters and injuring five -- one of the group's several recent attacks on the Kurds in the Hamrin Mountains region.

Some local Sunni insurgents could also be expected to stand aside or launch their own anti-IS operations in conjunction with a coalition effort to relieve Amerli. In the adjacent town of Suleiman Beg, the neo-Baathist militant group Jaish al-Tariqa al-Naqshbandia (JRTN) has launched at least four attempted uprisings since January 2013, only to see IS fighters stride in and take over after the most recent uprising succeeded in June. The two groups are now fighting a low-level war for control across the Hamrin Mountains region; this week alone, twelve JRTN fighters were found executed by the IS at Saadiyah, sixty miles southeast of Amerli. Moreover, before ISIS/IS ramped up its presence in the Amerli area in the past year, local Turkmens had good community relations with the Sunni Arabs at Suleiman Beg.

IMPLICATIONS FOR U.S. POLICY

As illustrated above, saving the Amerli pocket could strike an iconic blow at the Islamic State and draw together a rare community of interest between Baghdad, the Kurds, Turkey, Iran, and Washington. With the new Joint Operations Center established in the Kurdistan Regional Government in northern Iraq, the United States is well positioned to provide planning, coordination, logistical help, and airstrikes in support of any joint operation in the area. The U.S. military and PUK forces remain on very good terms, and U.S. personnel have extensive in-house experience working with local tribes and community leaders in Amerli, Suleiman Beg, and Tuz Khormatu city. The soldiers and civilians involved in past joint activities are only a phone call away, and some have already signaled their willingness to help old contacts in Amerli.

In short, many of the most promising arenas for U.S. intervention can be found in vital northern and western Iraqi battlegrounds away from Baghdad. If Washington's conditions for military intervention are met, a coalition effort to relieve the Turkmens at Amerli would be a good place to start. Such an operation would ideally be one of a number of linked battles that also fit the criteria of being achievable and in the interests of multiple factions -- hopefully building outward from the Tuz Khormatu, Kirkuk, and Lake Hamrin areas as Sunni militants looked to the example of Amerli and overthrew the IS presence in their own communities.

Operationally speaking, the United States is capable of resupplying the Amerli pocket with humanitarian and military supplies by air, effectively using night operations and airdrops in ways that Iraqi forces cannot. It could also evacuate the worst casualties and most helpless civilians. And a modicum of air support from the drones that already fly over Iraq would greatly improve the morale and survival chances of fighters in Amerli, as well as any Iraqi and Kurdish forces that push forward to relieve them. In addition, such strikes would be a timely reminder to allies and adversaries of the ongoing potency of U.S. airpower, and President Obama's willingness to use it when conditions are right.

Michael Knights is a Boston-based Lafer Fellow with The Washington Institute.

Edited by IbnSohan

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Its so sad how ISIS, worse than Israel is being given less attention to then Gaza. Iraq and Syria are in a much worse situation and many of our Shias would rather ignore it to go cry for a Pro-Baathi Pro-Wahhabi people

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URGENT: King of Saudi Arabia denounces ISIL terrorists as targeting Arabism & Islam says Ministry of Iraqi Foreign Affairs

 

http://www.iraqinews.com/baghdad-politics/ministry-of-foreign-affairs-saudi-stance-confirms-that-isil-terrorists-target-arabism-amp-islam/

 

 

(salam) brother that cobra just talks, I can't even believe a word from him that come with the truth. If he is taking part on aiding ISIS by giving financial aid, do you think he really mean that? I think one of his aim of that call to ministry of Iraqi foreign affairs is that he tries to say "yes we don't like them either" or try to silence their "innocent" to Iraq.

 

I wish all shias around the world who cares about the situation of Iraq, Syria and now Lebanon could fight some day together against those ISIS terrorists and would wipe them all from the earth.

Edited by sayedamir2000

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Why is the iraqi military not able to reconquer the territory & expel the sunni extremists? Why dont the iranian Army join the war?

1: Incompetence.

 

2: If Iran join, then this will be seen as Arabs vs Persians or worse, Sunnis vs Shias. At the moment, it isn't being seen as such, as ISIS are predominantly being condemned by anyone that is not a Wahabbi.

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(salam)

 

An article in Asharq al-Awsat, "Saudi King Adbullah counter terrorism comments praised", O2Aug2014; the King denounces "extremist groups" but does not mention ISIS explicitly.

 

Also, today, the Saudis have given $1 Billion to the Lebanese Army, while fighting continues in the north of that country.

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Why is the iraqi military not able to reconquer the territory & expel the sunni extremists? Why dont the iranian Army join the war?

 

The Iraqi army, already untrained and more or less uneffective, was caught off guard. This is where the Shi'a militias come in. Iran has military advisors in Iraq at the moment formulating strategies. Even the top general Qassem Suleimani is there working as an advisor.

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The Iraqi army, already untrained and more or less uneffective, was caught off guard. This is where the Shi'a militias come in. Iran has military advisors in Iraq at the moment formulating strategies. Even the top general Qassem Suleimani is there working as an advisor.

 

As I stated in this thread: http://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235023064-my-solution-for-iraq/ the existence of any Shi'a militias at all in Iraq is a direct threat to national security, not helping it. All of these militias: Jaysh al-Mahdi, AAH, Abu al-Walid, Iraqi Hezb, Abu Fadhl Abbas, and several more all worsen the state and national unity of Iraq and are only helping by physically fighting.

 

That's why the Iraqi Army is so weak, Iraqi militiamen need to use their brains and join the Iraqi Army instead of pledging their allegiance to different scholars with below average leadership qualities. It's embarrassing that the Asa'ib Ahl al-Haq is better trained (thank you, Iran) and more battle-ready than most of the Iraqi army (excluding the volunteers) and this is a fact. 

 

If Iraqis want Iraq to stay together as a country, then fight together under the country's army. This is absolutely poor execution by Iraq.

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As I stated in this thread: http://www.shiachat.com/forum/topic/235023064-my-solution-for-iraq/ the existence of any Shi'a militias at all in Iraq is a direct threat to national security, not helping it. All of these militias: Jaysh al-Mahdi, AAH, Abu al-Walid, Iraqi Hezb, Abu Fadhl Abbas, and several more all worsen the state and national unity of Iraq and are only helping by physically fighting.

 

That's why the Iraqi Army is so weak, Iraqi militiamen need to use their brains and join the Iraqi Army instead of pledging their allegiance to different scholars with below average leadership qualities. It's embarrassing that the Asa'ib Ahl al-Haq is better trained (thank you, Iran) and more battle-ready than most of the Iraqi army (excluding the volunteers) and this is a fact. 

 

If Iraqis want Iraq to stay together as a country, then fight together under the country's army. This is absolutely poor execution by Iraq.

I dont disagree with this.

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Baashiqa witness mass displacement as Yazidis convert to Islam in fear of being killed
 
August 04, 2014 12:30
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A well-informed source said on Monday, August 4th that Baashiqa’s inhabitants are massively fleeing their homes while pointing out that Yazidis are converting to Islam in fear of being killed by armed men.

“Baashiqa reagion is witnessing mass exude as its inhabitants flee to Al Shaykhan and Aakra district in fear of armed men taking over their villages”, mentioned the source to Alsumaria news.

“Armed guerillas are attempting to head towards Baashiqa” added the source who wished to remain anonymous.

The source also confirmed that “some Yazidis have fled towards the hills while others stayed in their homes and converted to Islam in fear of getting killed”.

Mossul is characterized by its ethnic and religious diversity, as Arabs, Kurds, Turkmen, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Syriacs, Armenians and others from different religions have lived together peacefully for thousands of years.

 

 

 

 

 

ISIS blows up 13 artesian wells and contaminates 9 in Al Aadhim, Iraq
 
July 30, 2014 12:40
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Al Khales District governorate in Iraqi Diyala province announced today that members of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) have destroyed 13 artesian wells with explosives while they contaminated 9 others in Al Aadhim region north of Baaqubah.

“ISIS members blew up 13 artesian wells and contaminated 9 other with gasoline in Al Aadhim region (located at 60 km north of Baaqubah)”, stated the region’s administrative officer Uday Al Khadran in a statement to Alsumaria.

“70% of the region’s inhabitants depend on artesian wells for potable water and irrigation”, added Khadran.

Diyala has been witnessing a tense security situation since June 10th, 2014 when ISIS guerillas attempted to take over some of its regions after they invaded Nineveh and closed in on Salahuddine; nevertheless Iraqi Army troops pushed them out of many fallen regions.

 

 

 

 

Iraq files lawsuit in Texas courts to reacquire Kurdish oil shipment
 
July 29, 2014 11:00
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Iraq has filed a lawsuit in Texas’ court of law demanding to reacquire the crude oil shipment originating from Iraqi Kurdistan as Baghdad claims it was sold without its approval. 

United Kalavryta tanker docked in Port of Galvestone near Huston after it took the American coast guards’ permission on Sunday; transferring its load to smaller tankers who will deliver it to American regions. 

In the lawsuit filed before the US criminal court in south Texas, Iraq asked for a decision to be issued allowing Iraqi officers to confiscate the shipment. 

The American Government dreads that if Kurdistan continues to independently sell oil, it will contribute to dismantling the Iraqi State. US Department of State said that Iraqi oil is the property of all Iraqis and warned any potential buyer of the shipment from its legal complications; clarifying that it will not take any part in it.

Baghdad will not take it well if Kurdish crude oil was sold to an American refinery and will view it as smuggling. Meanwhile the American Government fears that this sort of oil deals will further break Iraq apart.

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Praise to Allah (swt):

 

300 detainees escape from ISIS after bombing juvenile prison

 

Shafaq News / Iraqi military intelligence announced that about 300 detainees have managed to escape from juvenile prison in Mosul city after being detained by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria “ISIS” organization.

 
 
URGENT: ISIL’s leader, Abu Bakar al-Baghdadi, threatens to occupy Kuwait, take revenge against America

 

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of ISIL, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

(IraqiNews.com) Kuwaiti security sources confirmed that the leader of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Abu Bakar al-Baghdadi, has threatened to occupy Kuwait in order to “take revenge and fight” against America. Kuwaiti security sources are monitoring Kuwaiti accounts on social networking sites which sympathize with ISIL.

The Jordanian newspaper “Sawsana” also cited Kuwaiti security sources that “the leader of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant who calls himself Muslim Caliph, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, threatened to occupy Kuwait in order to fight against America.”

Sawsana added in their article, titled “al-Baghdadi threatens to occupy Kuwait,” that al-Baghdadi said on his personal account on the social networking site Twitter that “we have scores to settle with America, but we cannot reach them so we will occupy Kuwait, then America will come to us and we will fight them and our take revenge.”

 

 

 

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One for all and all for one

 

Iraqi Kurds fight ISIS at Erbil

em.jpeg
6 August 2014 - 1:51pm

 

Armed Iraqi Kurds are fighting militants of the Islamic State 40km from Erbil, the administrative center of Iraqi Kurdistan, RIA Novosti reports.
The operation to drive off Sunni militants continues with the cooperation of Turkish and Syrian Kurds, according to Khallo Pendzhveni, an official of the Kurdish autonomy. He clarified that the Kurds were fighting north and east of Mosul. Members of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party and the Syrian Democratic Alliance were fighting at Sinjar.
Over 50,000 refugees from Sinjar are hiding. Most of them are Yezids surrounded by extremists. They will start dying unless they get water and food within a day.

 

Armed Iraqi Kurds are fighting militants of the Islamic State 40km from Erbil, the administrative center of Iraqi Kurdistan, RIA Novosti reports.

The operation to drive off Sunni militants continues with the cooperation of Turkish and Syrian Kurds, according to Khallo Pendzhveni, an official of the Kurdish autonomy. He clarified that the Kurds were fighting north and east of Mosul. Members of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party and the Syrian Democratic Alliance were fighting at Sinjar.

Over 50,000 refugees from Sinjar are hiding. Most of them are Yezids surrounded by extremists. They will start dying unless they get water and food within a day.

 

http://vestnikkavkaza.net/news/politics/58492.html

 


Women and children from Sinjar gather in a makeshift camp in Duhok
KRG Women’s Council: Sinjar Event is “Genocide”
05.08.2014
 
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 BasNews, Erbil
 
The High Council of Women’s Affairs in the Iraqi Kurdistan region has condemned the recent actions of Islamic State [iS] against Sinjar women, labeling it “genocide”.
 
In a published statement the Council said that they are appalled at the reports of kidnapping hundreds of Sinjar women in recent days.
 
After IS Militants overran the Yazidi-majority town of Sinjar in Northern Iraq, reports emerged of the extremist group kidnapping Sinjari women and taking them to unknown locations.
 
“We condemn the recent violations and violence of IS militants against the families of Sinjar especially the kidnapping of hundreds of women,” the statement said.
 
The Council also claimed that some of the girls kidnapped by IS insurgents in Sinjar are as young as nine.
 
Media reports claim that IS will use the kidnapped women for temporary marriage known in Arabic as “Nikah”.
 
Finally the women’s committee called on the international community as well as UN Security Council to aid and assist Yazidi refugees as soon as possible.
 
According to UN figures, since IS took over Sinjar, about 200,000 people from the area have fled, most of them to Sinjar mountain whilst others travelled to the Kurdistan region.

To the UN, US, UK, and every gambler with human life and nations futures.

 

Yezidi MP in Iraq: ‘We Are Being Slaughtered’ By RUDAW yesterday at 04:08
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Children are among the tens of thousands stuck for days in the Shingal mountains, where dozens have already died of starvation and thirst. Photo: Rudaw
BAGHDAD, Iraq – A Yezidi MP in the Iraqi parliament broke down in tears as she pleaded for immediate help for thousands from her community stuck for days on an arid mountain, where more than 60 children and the elderly have died of starvation and thirst.

“We are being slaughtered under the banner of ‘there is no God but Allah,’” Vian Dakhil told MPs, referring the families who fled to the outskirts of Shingal, which fell to Islamic State (IS/ISIS) militants on Saturday.
 

In tears, Dakhil said that an entire religion is being exterminated by the Islamic zealots, who remain holed up in Shingal under heavy fire from Peshmerga forces.
 

“There is now a campaign of genocide being waged on the Yazidis,” Dakhil said.
 

“Brothers, leave all political disputes aside, we want humanitarian solidarity!  Speak here in the name of humanity: save us! save us!” Dakhil appealed.
 

She added that, “Thirty-thousand families are besieged in the Shingal mountains without water and food. They are dying. Seventy babies have died,” she said.
 

“Our women are taken as slaves and sold in the slave market,” Dakhil said, referring to the IS practice of taking women as war booty. 
 

Yezidi leaders have continued to seek international help for the tens of thousands displaced by the ongoing fighting and are at imminent risk of death.
 

They have reported that over the past three days the militants have killed many from the community and taken 500 Yezidi women as hostages. IS fighters have posted pictures of dead Yezidis on the Internet. 
 

Earlier this week, Kurdish President Massoud Barzani vowed to “defend Shingal and our Yezidi brothers and sisters.”
 

IS fighters, who have already driven out Christians from their ancestral homes in northern Iraq – including Zumar -- have been especially targeting the Yezidis, a gentle community they consider to be “devil worshipers.”

The United Nations has called the situation in Shingal and other parts of Nineveh province “a humanitarian disaster.” 

With no Iraqi forces left in those regions, the Kurdish Peshmerga fighters remain the only barrier between the militants and the Kurdish community of Yezidis and Christians in the province.

 

On Monday, Barzani ordered more than 10,000 Kurdish fighters into an offensive against IS, which has declared an Islamic Caliphate in captured territories in Iraq and Syria, with its capital in Mosul. Iraq’s second-largest city fell to the militants in June.

http://rudaw.net/english/middleeast/iraq/060820143

 

 

 

 

 

Turkish Jets Where Peshmerga Fighting Islamic State
By RUDAW 2 hours ago
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Turkish jet fighters are in skies over Iraqi Kurdistan.

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region – Turkish F-16 fighters have taken off from an air base in Diyarbakir for skies over Iraq where Kurdish Peshmerga forces are locked in fierce fighting against the Islamic State (IS/ISIS), a media report in Turkey said.
 

Turkish F-16s have taken off from the military airport in Amed (Diyarbakir) towards the sky south of (Iraqi) Kurdistan to monitor the situation in the areas where there is ongoing fighting between Peshmergas and ISIS, especially the borders of Makhmour in the Kurdistan Region, the Sabah newspaper reported.
 

The report came as Kurdish Peshmerga forces were pushing ahead with an offensive that began Saturday.
 

The Kurds, whose Peshmergas are seen as the key to turning the tide against IS armies fighting in Syria and in control of large parts of Iraq, have been winning greater international support, after weeks of pleading for arms and expertise.
 

The Peshmergas have no air power but formidable ground forces. Peshmerga officials have confirmed the forces are now equipped with new heavy weapons, but have remained mum about where the arms were coming from. 
 

Jet fighters have been seen pounding IS positions, with Iraq saying its air forces were involved in the fighting. A US official also told Rudaw that Washington was going to provide air power.
 

The reports of Turkish involvement coincided with Peshmergas fighting on the border of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city which the militants have named as the capital of their self-declared Caliphate.

 
Edited by IbnSohan

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The Vice Documentary: They say that Abu Bakr is al-Qurayshi and Amir al Momineen.

Not a problem.... Brother keep us informed you seem to provide good information....

Plus they say he is descendent if imam hussain a.s ( looks like Mossad done their homework) the war in iraq syria and Lebanon as I see it all to undermine Iran.... Isis are known as disposable assets just like al Qaeda Taliban ttp lashkar jangvi they using them wen their finished they'll dispose them

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According to Bible prophecy the city of Babylon is destroyed near the end of the age just before the return of Jesus Christ. Many scholars question whether Babylon in prophecy is actually a physical place or if it should just represent the religious or economic systems of the world. Today it would appear to many that spiritual Babylon is in Rome and economic Babylon is New York City. Nevertheless, Bible prophecy is quite clear that there will be an actual Babylon on the plains of Shinar (Iraq) in the end times. This city will become the headquarters for the end time world system led by the Beast Antichrist and his Kingdom that will rule the world. Scholars question how this poor insignificant place can someday become the Babylon that is expressed in the book of Revelation. The likely answer is oil, the Antichrist and Satan.



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As much as I hate to say this..... But shouldn't we blame ayatollah sistani as much as we blame nur al Maliki the whole world knows shia and Sunni plus westerners iraq is under his control and power..... Allah swt has blessed him with this power why not make Iraqis life better under his guidance??? What is he scared of? He doesn't have to copy wiliyat faqih system but I'm sure Shias Sunnis Christians wil listen to him!! Ayatollah sistani should and could take responsibility rather than give statements Islam is the answer to all problems.... Ayatollah khomenei didn't have it all Rosey he went thru some tough times...... In iraq we were blessed with ayatollah baqir al sadr ( the genius of our time) but Iraqis ignored he would've been the best leader but Allah swt knws best all I say Najaf hawza and Qum hawza need to come together rather than have their boxing match the Arabs, Iraqis have to admit Qum has been shia capital for a while so put ur nationalist ideas to one side and unite!!!

" a great civilization only gets conquered when it destroy it self within"

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ROBERT FISKObama’s air strikes on Isis in northern Iraq are hypocritical, and a sense of déjà vu is understandable
 
Bombs away! US to the rescue – but only of certain minorities, not Muslims
 
 
 
 
druze.jpg
 
 
 
 

He wouldn’t bomb Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s bloody caliphate when it was butchering the majority Shia Muslims of Iraq. But Barak Obama is riding to the rescue of the Christian refugees – and the Yazidis – because of “a potential act of genocide”. Bombs away. And thank heavens that the refugees in question are not Palestinian.

This hypocrisy almost takes the breath away, not least because the US President is still too frightened – in case he upsets the Turks – to use the “G” word about the 1915 Turkish genocide of a million and a half Armenian Christians, a mass slaughter on a scale which even Abu Bakr’s thugs have not yet attempted. We’ll have to wait another year to see how Obama wriggles out of the 100th anniversary commemorations of that particular Muslim massacre of Christians.

But for now, “America is coming to help” in Iraq with air strikes on “convoys” of Isis fighters. But isn’t that what the Americans staged against the Taliban in Afghanistan, often mistaking innocent wedding parties for Islamist “convoys”? Dropping food parcels to minority refugees in fear of their lives on the bare mountainsides of northern Iraq – also under way – is exactly the same operation US forces performed for the Kurds almost a quarter of a century ago; and in the end, they had to put American and British soldiers on the ground to create a “safe haven” for the Kurds.

Nor has Obama said anything about his friendly ally Saudi Arabia, whose Salafists are the inspiration and fund-raisers for the Sunni militias of Iraq and Syria, just as they were for the Taliban in Afghanistan. The wall between the Saudis and the monsters they create – and which America now bombs – must be kept as high as it must be invisible. That is the measure of American dissimulation in this latest act of duplicity. Obama is bombing the friends of his Saudi allies – and the enemies of the Assad regime in Syria, by the way – but won’t say so. And just for good measure, he believes that America must act in defence of its consulate in Erbil and embassy in Baghdad.

That’s the same excuse the US used when it fired its naval guns into the Chouf mountains of Lebanon 30 years ago: that Lebanon’s pro-Syrian warlords were endangering the US embassy in Beirut. That the Islamists are as unlikely to seize Irbil as they are to capture Baghdad is neither here nor there. Obama says he has a “mandate” to bomb from the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki, the elected but dictatorial Shia who now runs Iraq as a broken and sectarian state. How we Westerners love “mandates”, ever since the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, which drew the borders of the Middle East for our “mandates” – the very frontiers which Abu Bakr’s caliphate has now sworn to destroy. There is not much doubt about the awfulness of the equally sectarian Isis which Abu Bakr is creating.

 

 

His threat to the Christians of Iraq – convert, pay tax or die – has now been turned against the Yazidis, the harmless and tiny sect whose Persian-Assyrian roots, Christian-Islamo rituals and forgiving God have doomed them as assuredly as the Christians. Ethnic Kurds, the poor old Yazidis believe that God, whose seven angels supposedly govern the Earth, pardoned Satan: so inevitably, this ancient people came to be regarded as devil-worshippers. Hence their 130,000 refugees – at least 40,000 of them living on mountain rocks in at least nine locations around Mount Sinjar – tell stories of rape, murder and child-killing at the hands of Abu Bakr’s men. Alas, they may all be true.

The Yazidis are probably descended from supporters of the second Umayyad Caliph, Yazid the First; his suppression of Hussein, the son of Ali – whose followers are now the Shia of the Middle East – might theoretically have commended the Yazidis to Abu Bakr’s Sunni Muslim army. But their mixed rituals and their denial of evil were never going to find favour with a group which – like Saudi Arabia and the Taliban – believes in “the suppression of vice and the propagation of virtue”. In the fault lines that lie across ancient Kurdistan, Armenia and what was Mesopotamia, history has dealt the Yazidis a bad hand.

 But for them and the Nestorians and other Christian groups, Obama has gone to war. The French, their old Crusader spirits reawakened, called the Security Council to reflect upon this Christian pogrom. But the question remains: would America have done the same if the wretched minority refugees of northern Iraq had been Palestinians? Or will Obama’s latest bombing campaign merely provide a welcome distraction from the killing fields of Gaza? 

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As much as I hate to say this..... But shouldn't we blame ayatollah sistani as much as we blame nur al Maliki the whole world knows shia and Sunni plus westerners iraq is under his control and power..... Allah swt has blessed him with this power why not make Iraqis life better under his guidance??? What is he scared of? He doesn't have to copy wiliyat faqih system but I'm sure Shias Sunnis Christians wil listen to him!! Ayatollah sistani should and could take responsibility rather than give statements Islam is the answer to all problems.... Ayatollah khomenei didn't have it all Rosey he went thru some tough times...... In iraq we were blessed with ayatollah baqir al sadr ( the genius of our time) but Iraqis ignored he would've been the best leader but Allah swt knws best all I say Najaf hawza and Qum hawza need to come together rather than have their boxing match the Arabs, Iraqis have to admit Qum has been shia capital for a while so put ur nationalist ideas to one side and unite!!!

" a great civilization only gets conquered when it destroy it self within"

every human has their own limitation even ayatollah sistani has his own limitations, some times what ever is happening is wish of Allah and it cant be controlled by any one.

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Obama's message to ISIS: Stay out of Kurdistan, but the rest of northern Iraq is all yours

Updated by Max Fisher on August 8, 2014, 10:20 a.m. ET @Max_Fisher max@vox.com

 
453318002.0_standard_755.0.jpgPresident Obama announces air strikes against ISIS in IraqSAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty
 
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When President Obama announced Thursday that he had authorized air strikes against ISIS, the extremist Sunni group that has seized large parts of Iraq and Syria, he did not use the phrase "red line," but the implication was clear.

The United States will use military force against ISIS if — and only if — the group threatens Iraq's largely autonomous Kurdish region. That is the red line.

 

"To stop the advance on [the Kurdish capital city of] Erbil, I've directed our military to take targeted strikes against ISIL terrorist convoys should they move toward the city," Obama said. He also said he had "authorized targeted airstrikes, if necessary, to help forces in Iraq as they fight to break the siege of Mount Sinjar [where thousands of civilians have fled from ISIS] and protect the civilians trapped there."

OBAMA IS DRAWING A RED LINE AROUND IRAQI KURDISTAN -EVERYONE OUTSIDE OF IT IS ON THEIR OWN

If you are a member of ISIS, here is how you might hear Obama's message: Stay away from Iraqi Kurdistan, and the rest of northern Iraq is yours to keep. Based on Obama's words and actions so far, you would not be so wrong.

ISIS first swept through northern Iraq in June, invading from the territory it had already conquered in Syria. The group took Iraq's second-largest city, Mosul, as well as much of Iraq's largely Sunni north. The US sent military advisors to Iraq and evacuated its diplomats from Baghdad to the much-safer Kurdish region, but it did not take any military action against ISIS. The group had stopped short of Baghdad and had not pushed into Iraq's Kurdish region.

America's calculus changed over the last few days, as ISIS has made its first real push into the Kurdish region, taking some Kurdish towns, encroaching awfully close to the Kurdish capital of Erbil, and creating a humanitarian catastrophe by forcing ten thousand or more Yazidi minority civilians out of their homes and onto a nearby mountain, where they are waiting to die of starvation or ISIS's guns.

Invading Iraq's Kurdish region, it turned out, was Obama's red line for ISIS. There are a few reasons why. The Kurdish region is far stabler, politically, than the rest of Iraq. (Kurds are ethnically distinct from the rest of Iraq, which is largely ethnic Arab; most Kurds are Sunni Muslims.) The Kurdish region, which has been semi-autonomous since the United States invaded in 2003 and has grown more autonomous from Baghdad ever since, also happens to be a much more reliable US ally than is the central Iraqi government. It has a reasonably competent government and military, unlike the central Iraqi government, which is volatile, unstable, deeply corrupt, and increasingly authoritarian.

BBC_iraq_map.png

ISIS areas of control in yellow, Kurdistan in green (BBC)

It's not hard to see how a cost-benefit calculation might lead the Obama administration to choose defending just Iraqi Kurdistan over defending all of Iraq from ISIS: the Kurdish region is smaller, it already has a competent military on the ground, it is reliably pro-US, and it can probably be protected at much lower risk to the US. With the rest of Iraq in chaos, the Kurdish region is also America's last reliable base in the country, so if Erbil falls to ISIS then the US could effectively be out altogether.

Defending all of Iraq against ISIS, meanwhile, would be much more difficult. Iraq's military is corrupt and has previously deserted in large number against the insurgents, meaning the onus would be on US or other foreign troops; ISIS already controls huge parts of the country, so booting them out would require a full invasion force. Re-taking all of northern Iraq would be very costly and high-risk for the US, and while the reward would be humanitarian relief for many northern Iraqis, it could also force the US to once again military occupy a part of the world that Obama worked very hard to remove US troops from.

KICKING ISIS OUT OF NORTHERN IRAQ COULD REQUIRE ANOTHER US OCCUPATION

That is likely how Iraqi Kurdistan became Obama's red line for ISIS. On a background briefing call with White House officials late on Thursday, the emphasis on defending Erbil came through loud and clear: the US is clearly designing its intervention around protecting the Kurdish region; any effect for the rest of Iraq is secondary, and was premised on Iraq's government first fulfilling some political commitments.

The effect, though, is to imply that the US will not intervene against ISIS if they remain on the correct side of the red line — effectively giving them the US go-ahead to continue terrorizing the vast territory in northern Iraq they've already seized.

This is the problem that Obama created with his 2012 red line for Syria, in which he stated that the US would intervene against the Syrian government if it used chemical weapons against civilians. The implication was that the US would not intervene if Syria continued using conventional weapons to slaughter many thousands of civilians, which Syria did with great enthusiasm. Syria did end up crossing that red line, frequently and egregiously, and the US did not really punish it very much, although that may have more to do with deeper differences between Syria and Iraq.

So there is good reason to worry, based on Obama's record with his Syria red line, that he might not fully follow through on defending Iraqi Kurdistan from ISIS as he seemed to promise on Thursday. Still, there are some key distinctions: the US has broad international support, at least so far, for Iraq in a way that it did not for Syria. The US has the support of the Iraqi government, whereas in Syria the government was its opponent. And it is much easier to measure whether the red line is crossed: Syria wore down its red line by using very small sarin gas attacks, and in a way that left ambiguity as to what had happened, so that by the time it was gassing whole neighborhoods the effect had been gradual and thus easier for the world to ignore. That's less true in Iraq; either ISIS invades Erbil or it doesn't, so the red line is clearer and more categorical.

It is possible that Obama's calculus on this could change, or that he is quietly planning to support a larger Iraqi push to kick ISIS out of the rest of the country. But, on the surface, for now, it certainly looks like America is drawing a giant red line around Iraqi Kurdistan – and telling everyone outside of it that they're on their own.

 

 

 

ISIS Is Ignoring Islam’s Teachings on Yazidis and Christians
    
rtr417ah.jpg?w=1100Displaced families from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar west of Mosul, arrive at Dohuk province, Aug. 4, 2014.Ari Jalal—Reuters Here's what the Prophet and the Quran really say about how to treat the two faith groups
 

The news coming out of Iraq is really devastating. The violent extremist group known as ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) continues to take over major parts of Iraq, brutally killing and oppressing any and all who come in their way. The worst of ISIS has been unleashed on Shia Muslims, Christians, and the Yazidis with hundreds of thousands killed and forced to flee.

 
 

The leader of ISIS, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, is as dangerous as he is delusional. In a sermon that he gave several weeks ago, the ISIS leader declared himself as the new “caliph” of Muslims worldwide. In the sermon he attempted to reflect the personality of Islam’s first caliph, Abu Bakr al-Sadiq, in asking those gathered to help him when he is right and correct him when he is wrong and to only obey him so long as he obeys God and the Messenger. But, the Qur’an warns its readers to not be swayed by charismatic figures who, in reality, only spread evil in the world:

“Now, there is a kind of man whose views on the life of this world may please thee greatly, and [the more so as] he cites God as witness to what is in his heart and is, moreover, exceedingly skillful in argument. But whenever he prevails, he goes about the earth spreading corruption and destroying property and progeny [even though] God does not like corruption. And whenever he is told, “Be conscious of God,” his false pride drives him into [even greater] sin…” (2:204–2:206).

So, I join the chorus of Muslims worldwide, Sunnis and Shias, who oppose al-Baghdadi and the ISIS as a whole. The killing and oppression of innocent people and the destruction of land and property is completely antithetical to Islam’s normative teachings. It’s as pure and as simple as that.

Ironically, when the Qur’an allows (and, sometimes, even encourages) Muslims to engage in just fighting and resistance it is in order to deter those who wage wars without just cause and those who engage in religious persecution — exact crimes that the ISIS is engaging in Iraq today:

“Permission [to fight] is given to those against whom war is being wrongfully waged…those who have been driven from their homelands against all right for no other reason than their saying, “Our Sustainer is God!” For, if God had not enabled people to defend themselves against one another, monasteries and churches and synagogues and mosques – in which God’s name is abundantly extolled would surely have been destroyed…” (22:39–22:40)

Yazidis are an ancient community that have been in Iraq for centuries. Historically Yazidis follow Zoroastrianism and other ancient Mesopotamian religions. Throughout recent history the Yazidis have been oppressed and their religion largely misunderstood as Satan worship (which it is not). The violence and suffering that ISIS has inflicted upon the Yazidis is heartwrenching. There is, arguably, one reference to the ancient religion of the Yazidis (referred to as Magians) in the Qur’an in which it simply says, “Verily, as for those who have attained to faith [in this divine writ], and those who follow the Jewish faith, and the Sabians, and the Christians, and the Magians [on the one hand,] and those who are bent on ascribing divinity to aught but God, [on the other,] verily, God will decide between them on Resurrection Day: for, behold, God is witness unto everything” (22:17). ISIS would do well to, truly, let God decide rather than act as tryanical judges and lords over the Yazidis and others.

ISIS is also reportedly seeking to expel Christians from their homeland of Iraq where Christians have lived since almost the beginning of their history. Christians in Iraq are considered to be one of the oldest continuous surviving Christian communities in the world. Christians in Iraq have survived, and at times even thrived, alongside Muslims over the last fourteen-hundred years. ISIS insistence that Christians either “convert, leave, or die” defies the Qur’anic command: “Let there be no compulsion in religion” (2:256).

The ISIS has also given Christians another option if they want to remain in Iraq: To pay jizya. Jizya is a tax that Muslim empires imposed upon non-Muslim constituents in return for military exemption, protection against persecution, and considerable religious freedoms. Most Muslim countries today no longer impose the jizya tax on non-Muslims. The change in political order, rise of nation states, and assumptions of citizenship today render certain medieval systems incongruent with modern realities and sensibilities. The Qur’an makes a reference to the jizya system (9:29), but its application is vague and it can very well be argued that such an imposition was only intended to manage troublesome and treacherous religious minorities. This is all to say that ISIS has no basis whatsoever to force Christians in Iraq to pay the jizya tax let alone the fact that they cannot even be considered a legitimate government by any stretch of the imagination and, therefore, cannot rightfully impose any taxes on anyone.

The strongest argument against ISIS persecution of Christians is the fact that such actions are in direct violation of the Prophet Muhammad’s own treaties with Christians in which he guarantees the protection of religious freedom and other rights:

(The original letter is now in the Topkapi Museum in Istanbul, Turkey)

“This is a message from Muhammad ibn Abdullah, as a covenant to those who adopt Christianity, near and far, we are with them. Verily I, the servants, the helpers, and my followers defend them, because Christians are my citizens; and by Allah! I hold out against anything that displeases them.

No compulsion is to be on them. Neither are their judges to be removed from their jobs nor their monks from their monasteries.

No one is to destroy a house of their religion, to damage it, or to carry anything from it to the Muslims’ houses. Should anyone take any of these, he would spoil God’s covenant and disobey His Prophet. Verily, they are my allies and have my secure charter against all that they hate.

No one is to force them to travel or to oblige them to fight. The Muslims are to fight for them. If a female Christian is married to a Muslim, it is not to take place without her approval. She is not to be prevented from visiting her church to pray.

Their churches are to be respected. They are neither to be prevented from repairing them nor the sacredness of their covenants. No one of the nation (Muslims) is to disobey the covenant till the Last Day (end of the world).”

This and many similar covenants between the Prophet Muhammad and Christian communities is well-documented and translated by Dr. John Andrew Morrow in his book, “The Covenants of the Prophet Muhammad with the Christians of the World” (Angelico Press, 2013). These covenants are a determining proof, among other proofs, that what ISIS is engaged in right now in Iraq is completely unlawful (haraam) and violates Islamic teachings in every way.

To the ISIS or anyone who sympathizes with them, know that Islam believes in a God of mercy, a scripture of mercy, and a Prophet who sent as a mercy to all the worlds. It is time to abandon persecution and violence, murder and mayhem. The enemy you seek to fight is within you. The pursuit of power is the problem. The pursuit of peace and social justice is what God really calls us to. Put down your arms. And, raise up your hands to the sky seeking God’s forgiveness for unconscionable sins.

Sohaib Sultan is the Muslim chaplain at Princeton University and directs the university’s Muslim Life Program in the Office of Religious Life. He is the author of The Koran for Dummies(Wiley, 2004) and The Qur’an and Sayings of the Prophet Muhammad: Selections Annotated and Explained (Skylight Paths, 2007).

Edited by IbnSohan

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As much as I hate to say this..... But shouldn't we blame ayatollah sistani as much as we blame nur al Maliki the whole world knows shia and Sunni plus westerners iraq is under his control and power..... Allah swt has blessed him with this power why not make Iraqis life better under his guidance??? What is he scared of? He doesn't have to copy wiliyat faqih system but I'm sure Shias Sunnis Christians wil listen to him!! Ayatollah sistani should and could take responsibility rather than give statements Islam is the answer to all problems.... Ayatollah khomenei didn't have it all Rosey he went thru some tough times...... In iraq we were blessed with ayatollah baqir al sadr ( the genius of our time) but Iraqis ignored he would've been the best leader but Allah swt knws best all I say Najaf hawza and Qum hawza need to come together rather than have their boxing match the Arabs, Iraqis have to admit Qum has been shia capital for a while so put ur nationalist ideas to one side and unite!!!

" a great civilization only gets conquered when it destroy it self within"

Wow. That's sad.

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(salam)

 

On Bombing ISIS/ISIL:

 

Here's a thought. Remember back in August 1997 Clinton ordered Tomahawk strikes against al-Qaida bases in Afghanistan (and a pharmaceutical factory in Sudan). ?

 

In the 9-11 Commission report and elsewhere, this attack was cited as the reason al-Qaida decided to attack the USA.

 

So now, ISIS/ISIL which is far larger, has far more money, closer to US, has many foreign fighters about 100+ American...

 

and Obomb'em sends in airstrikes...

 

uhhhhh, do you kinda think they will launch an attack in the USA against US.????????  :donno:

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As much as I hate to say this..... But shouldn't we blame ayatollah sistani as much as we blame nur al Maliki the whole world knows shia and Sunni plus westerners iraq is under his control and power..... Allah swt has blessed him with this power why not make Iraqis life better under his guidance??? What is he scared of? He doesn't have to copy wiliyat faqih system but I'm sure Shias Sunnis Christians wil listen to him!! Ayatollah sistani should and could take responsibility rather than give statements Islam is the answer to all problems.... Ayatollah khomenei didn't have it all Rosey he went thru some tough times...... In iraq we were blessed with ayatollah baqir al sadr ( the genius of our time) but Iraqis ignored he would've been the best leader but Allah swt knws best all I say Najaf hawza and Qum hawza need to come together rather than have their boxing match the Arabs, Iraqis have to admit Qum has been shia capital for a while so put ur nationalist ideas to one side and unite!!!

" a great civilization only gets conquered when it destroy it self within"

He already tried using his power when he declared Jihaad al-Kifaa`i, what do you think he should do? You have seen his power bring nearly 3 million volunteers, but how come nothing changed? That's because the volunteers are being stopped from fighting! If the government just give every volunteer out there a pistol and a knife they will finish the war in days. 3 million against a few thousand!

And no way is Q`um the capital of Tashaayu`, they're both equal but I like Najaf more.

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