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In the Name of God بسم الله

2014 Iraq Conflict [Opinion & Analysis]

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The animals in the picture look afgan to me, rip all the soilders that have died by those rats. May rockets and bombs shower the areas the da3ish are in and may the sunni that open there doors to al da3ash be punished,those saddam lovers.

The protest against bbc is for sectrionism,their making it seem like it's shia verse sunnis in iraq and not iraqis verse da3sh...

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The 'grievances' sunnis worldwide have regarding iraq are beyond pathetic. As Noah has rightfully pointed out, we have a sunni speaker, a sunni president and - adding to that - SUNNI SOLDIERS, THE SAME DIRTBAGS WHO DEFECTED. And you know whats the worst part about this? The retarded, inbred, culturally illiterate media over here has been peddling the same conspiracy theories regarding Maliki as well. 

 

Arrogant ba'thi sunnis are just hurt that they dont have the lion's share in governing anymore. The only sectarians in the current conflict are the ISIS khawarij. 

 

I had a snoop on a sunni forum earlier and some there kept mentioning that sunni's had been persecuted under the Maliki govenrment, but no one gave any examples of how. Can anyone shed any light on what these persecutions were??

 

[edit] According to this article there were instances of people being treated bady when arrested: http://www.vox.com/2014/6/15/5810262/who-are-major-iraqi-political-groups-kirk-sowell

 

Anything else?

Edited by Ruq
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ISiS are wearing themselves out too much. They had the element of surprise and a few lucky breaks in the beginning, but now they will run out of gas, and will inshallah engage in retreat or as they call it  a "strategic withdrawal." I am pretty sure the backers of ISIS are holding their heads in shame as to how idiotic ISIS has been to think that they can actually take over baghdad. Taking over Baghdad is one thing, running it is a different story all together. They remind me of Genghis Khan and his traveling empire. Syed Sistani (Ha) has literally pulled out the rug beneath their feet. They will be encountering a wall of 2 million armed men and women, that is if they manage to outsmart the now well informed Iraqi army.

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The White House Is Convinced the Shiite Leader Is Unable to Reconcile With the Nation's Sunni Minority and Stabilize a Volatile Political Landscape.


http://live.wsj.com/video/hagel-it-u...D5F1EC906.html

The Obama administration is signaling that it wants a new government in Iraq without Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, convinced the Shiite leader is unable to reconcile with the nation's Sunni minority and stabilize a volatile political landscape.

The U.S. administration is indicating it wants Iraq's political parties to form a new government without Mr. Maliki as he tries to assemble a ruling coalition following elections this past April, U.S. officials say. 

Such a new government, U.S., officials say, would include the country's Sunni and Kurdish communities and could help to stem Sunni support for the al Qaeda offshoot, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, or ISIS, that has seized control of Iraqi cities over the past two weeks. That, the officials argue, would help to unify the country and reverse its slide into sectarian division.

On Wednesday, Iraq stepped up efforts on several fronts to blunt the insurgency's progress, deploying counterterrorism units and helicopter gunships to battle them for control of the country's main oil refinery, in Beiji. 


BN-DH977_usmali_D_20140618195714.jpg
An image grab taken from Iraqiya channel shows Iraqi Primi Minister Nouri al-Maliki delivering a televised speech in Baghdad on Wednesday.

A growing number of U.S. lawmakers and Arab allies, particularly Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, are pressing the White House to pull its support for Mr. Maliki. Some of them are pushing for change in exchange for providing their help in stabilizing Iraq, say U.S. and Arab diplomats.

The chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.) told a congressional hearing Wednesday: "The Maliki government, candidly, has got to go if you want any reconciliation."

Senior administration officials have become increasingly critical of Mr. Maliki in their public statements and question whether he is committed to mending ties with Sunnis.


"There's no question that not enough has been done by the government, including the prime minister, to govern inclusively, and that that has contributed to the situation and the crisis that we have today in Iraq," White House spokesman Jay Carney said Wednesday. "The Iraqi people will have to decide the makeup of the next coalition government and who is the prime minister," he added. "Whether it's the current prime minister or another leader, we will aggressively attempt to impress upon that leader the absolute necessity of rejecting sectarian governance."

The Obama administration has for years warned Mr. Maliki's Shiite-dominant government to be more inclusive and less punitive against the minority Sunnis at the risk of further alienating them. 

Mr. Maliki has largely ignored that advice over the past five years, U.S. and Arab officials say, jailing popular Sunni protest leaders, blocking even other Shiite blocs from sharing power and taking most key cabinet positions in government for himself. 

This week, as pressure rose from the U.S. and other allies to work toward a representative government for Iraq, Mr. Maliki participated in a unity meeting with top Sunni, Shiite, Kurdish leaders. The result wasn't hopeful, U.S. and Arab officials say.


"We believe that Maliki's sectarianism and exclusion of Sunnis has led to the insurgency we are seeing," said a senior Arab official. "He unfortunately managed to unite ISIS with the former Baathists and Saddam supporters."

President Barack Obama and his national security aides are in deliberations over the creation of a new strategy for stabilizing Iraq, with a clear roadmap expected in the coming days.

Mr. Obama has discussed the possibility of using air power and drone strikes to weaken ISIS, say U.S. officials. But he has been particularly focused on developing a political process to heal the widening rift between Iraq's Shiite and Sunni communities that officials see as feeding the support for ISIS's insurgency in western Iraq.

Mr. Obama met Wednesday with the top Republican and Democratic members of the House and Senate to update them on administration plans.

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.), the chamber's minority leader, issued a statement afterward, criticizing Mr. Obama's past policies on Iraq and saying it was important to apply the experience to the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in two years.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.), the House Democratic leader, said Mr. Obama didn't need any further legislative authority to pursue options in Iraq. But officials said Mr. Obama told the congressional leaders he would continue to consult with them. 

Earlier Wednesday, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, cautioned senators at a hearing against expecting quick U.S. military strikes, because of the difficulty of developing targets. "It's not as easy as looking at an iPhone video of a convoy and then immediately striking it," said Gen. Dempsey.

To support the administration approach, Secretary of State John Kerry and his aides have consulted with Iraq's neighbors—particularly Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Iran—to find a formula to create a more inclusive government in Baghdad. 

The State Department's point man on Iraq, Deputy Assistant Secretary Brett McGurk, has concurrently been meeting with Iraqi politicians and religious leaders in Baghdad to promote this political process, say U.S. officials.


The State Department wouldn't say if the Obama administration was specifically discussing the issue of removing Mr. Maliki during these talks. But Arab diplomats and policy advisors who have talked with the White House in recent days said it was clear the administration was "casting about for somebody better" than Mr. Maliki.

Mr. Kerry was even more pointed in his criticism of Mr. Maliki on Monday, arguing his removal could help stabilize Iraq's sectarian divide. 

"If there is a clear successor, if the results of the election are respected, if people come together with the cohesiveness necessary to build a legitimate government that puts the reforms in place that people want, that might wind up being very salutatory," he told Yahoo! News.

read more at: http://online.wsj.com/articles/u-s-signals-1403137521

 

 

 

 

Miss Hillary and her Double Standards in Iraq and Bahrain

1) In Iraq 50% MPs are Sunnies ... President, Foreign Minister and Speaker is Sunni. Only problem is this that under US pressure, Iraqi government retained the Bath Party and Saddam supporters in HIGH Positions in the Army and Police. 

These same Saddam supporters always supported hundreds of terrorist attacks against Shias and give shelter to these terrorists in their cities and never arrest them.

These same Saddam Police and Army members conspired recently in Mosul and handed over whole city to ISIS and ordered army to gave up their weapons and then later they were slaughtered. 

These Saddam supporters, who are at high ranking in Army and Police, they should be driven out from the forces and must be punished.

 

2) Bahrain

On the other hand, we have US allie Bahrain, who even does not let a single Shia enter into Army or Police. Thousands ofmercenaries are imported to control the Shia population. There is no democracy, no rights for Shias. 

But Miss Hillary is not able to see this ZULM in Bahrain. 


I wish someone could show these Double Standards to Miss Hillary. 

Edited by zainabia
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^Sister zainabia,

The problem with Iraq is that every criminal nation, gun-mafia, Nasibi, the Zionists, Turkey, Gulf-states, and etc want WAR and to partition the country.... until they play and play and play around to have an absolute puppet government loyal to the Nasibi-western Zionists...anti-religion, anti-Iran, and a bunch of ignorant nationalists who will label every single free Shia as Iranian agent. THEY ARE SCARED OF A FREE, POWERFUL AND UNITED IRAQ. It is going to be an example of freedom and prosperity if they let Iraq to develop in the multi-ethnic and multi-sect country. This by itself will kill and create anxiety within the Gulf-states, and western trouble makers who will find it difficult to play Iraq anything they are up to something....

 

While in Bahrain they did 'set' everything the way it is... they did create and found the current Saudi and UAE as they are...they did come up with the idea to have  a Morocco and Jordan as the two nations are at present..... why would they bother to create troubles for the ruling dictator parties over there? Or to go against them? That is the ideal makeup of these countries for them... something that they try hard to do in Lebanon since 2003 and been failing, something that they try hard to do in Syria, especially in the last 5 years, specifically after the armed uprising... something that they tried to do in Libya for the last 8 yrs, finally they got they chance and succeeded in the last 3 yrs...and are in the process of making and building an ideal-Libya... with Haftar on one side and their little lapdogs/excuses-the Takfiri dogs on the other side. I hope and pray that they fail in Lebanon, Iraq and Syria! And I hope they fail to breakup Nigeria, Pakistan, and a total fallout of Afghanistan, which I think is mainly on their agenda and under the operation and plans of these forces for sometimes now.

Edited by Noah-
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So, it all comes clear - the US, for all practical purposes, wants to rid Iraq of Shi'a power - and its closeness to Iran, that is why the armed (by the US) ISIS was given a green light to invade Iraq. Unfortunately, Iran, under the Rohanist presidential regime is weak, and does not see the situation for what it is... hopefully other branches of the Islamic Republic get it, and will not go about appeasing the imperialists. 

Edited by skylight2
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I would add that this is very similar to what the US tried to do with Russia, tried to remove Russia's influence from Ukraine, and put in place a fascist neo-Nazi anti-Russian regime to severely weaken Russia. Thankfully, Putin was smart, and he immediately took control of the most critical areas of Ukraine - annexed Crimea, and maintained a strong presence in eastern Ukraine. This resulted in a bankrupt Ukraine that the "west" now has to deal with.  

 

With regards to Iraq, things are not so clear cut - the wahabbist/takfiri forces can possibly take control of some of the most oil rich parts of Iraq, resulting in a poorer Iraq that Iran may end up having to bankroll... that just won't work. Iran needs to make it clear to the takfiri that their presence will not be tolerated, and they have to go. Furthermore, they have to make it clear to the US - that this business of "smile diplomacy" is finished, and done with - Rohani needs to get with the program, or get out of the way.  And all focus needs to be on defeating the imperial sponsored insurgency. That means, yes, Iran will end up having to face more sanctions etc. The alternative is even more dismal, with perpetual war against a takfiri and/or anti-Iran, pro-empire/zio. regime as their neighbors. 

Edited by skylight2
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ISIS, Inc. – Jihadists attract investors, fighters with annual reports & glossy PR

 
 

 

The United States however is reportedly ill-prepared to wage such attacks due to lack of intelligence on ISIL operations following its lightning advance. US military’s Joint Chief of Staff, Dempsey, says that although “it is in our national security interest to counter ISIS” the results of US involvement would be unknown “until we can clarify this intelligence picture” in Iraq.

 

 

How come?

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The problem with Iraq is their 20% sunni arab minority. Sunni islam teamchef that anyone who is able to slaughter, lie or steal their way into political power have he Divine Right to rule. This is why sunnis will never stop trying to overthrow any nation in which non-sunnis rule because sunnism = terrorist ideology.

Because of this I believe all sunnis should be forcefully converted into shi'ism or expelled from the land. Without such drastic action Iraq will never be at peace & probably wont last.

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Oil Ministry threatens to sue my agency “Reuters” and the “French”

dinar-vets.png?w=869

 

21918.jpg?width=400&crop=auto

 

 

BAGHDAD / obelisk: threatened and the Iraqi Oil Ministry, on Thursday to resort to the judiciary after the establishment of the Kalta News Almuten Reuters (Reuters), French (AFP) broadcast inaccurate information on the Baiji refinery, stressing that the security forces to take control of the refinery.

The ministry said in a statement obtained by “obelisk”, “The Oil Ministry deplores the agency is Almuten News, Reuters (Reuters), French (AFP) broadcast inaccurate information on terrorist gangs control parts of the Baiji refinery.”

The ministry confirmed that “the security forces in control of the refinery and vicinity and do not allow the terrorists approached him, and all the claims made otherwise is incorrect.”

The ministry noted that “the information reported by the two agencies in news reports for the past days is incorrect and contrary to truth and reality, and can be interpreted as mislead and confuse the security situation and give the implications and repercussions of the negative,” indicating that “it was incumbent upon Bolokulten information from official sources to be neutral in the transfer of information, especially since the Iraq faces a terrorist attack calls for everyone to deal with it professionally devoid of fancies and affiliations. “

The ministry stressed the need to “commitment and media professional standards and credibility in dealing with the information provided to them,” pointing out that it “reserves its legal right to deal with anyone who tries to falsify the facts and manipulate public opinion of the Iraqi and global and mislead in order to serve the interests of the enemy of the people and the homeland.”

https://therearenosunglasses.wordpress.com/2014/06/19/iraqi-oil-ministry-threatens-to-sue-reuters-and-afp-for-false-reports-on-terrorists-controlling-baiji-refinery/

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50 lashes for anyone who watches Alfayha channel in ISIS court in Balad


Iraq Sending 59 Officers to Court for Abandoning Mosul

June 19, 2014 - 18:03

TEHRAN (Tasnim) - Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said 59 officers will be brought before court for fleeing their posts last week as insurgents seized Mosul, Iraq's northern biggest city.

 
 
 
 
 

Maliki's military spokesman, Lieutenant General Qassim Atta, read the names of the officers on state television on Wednesday.

The announcement came a day after Maliki dismissed four top generals and said they were being charged in military court for abandoning Mosul last Tuesday as the city fell.

The commanders were dismissed because they failed to perform their national duty, said the Iraqi premier on Tuesday.

Top officers, including Lieutenant General Mehdi Sabah Ghawari, the top commander for Nineveh province where ISIL militants have gained ground, were fired because they "failed to fulfill their professional and military duties," according to a government statement read out on state television.

One of the commanders, Hidayat Abdulraheem, had fled a battle and would be referred to the military court to be tried in absentia, it said.

Mosul, Iraq’s second city, was captured by the ISIL after soldiers and police forces fled en masse on June 10, which was followed by the capture of Tikrit, located 140 kilometers (87 miles) northwest of the capital Baghdad.

 

 
 
 
Atta: All volunteers to be granted privileges of security forces
 
 

Baghdad (IraqiNews.com) The Spokesperson of the General Commander of the Armed Forces, Qasim Atta, announced that the volunteers will get the same privileges of the security elements.

Atta stated in a press conference “The instructions of the General Commander of the Armed Forces assured that the volunteers will be the supporting force for the security elements and will be granted their privileges.”

 
Edited by IbnSohan
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The problem with Iraq is their 20% sunni arab minority. Sunni islam teamchef that anyone who is able to slaughter, lie or steal their way into political power have he Divine Right to rule. This is why sunnis will never stop trying to overthrow any nation in which non-sunnis rule because sunnism = terrorist ideology.

Because of this I believe all sunnis should be forcefully converted into shi'ism or expelled from the land. Without such drastic action Iraq will never be at peace & probably wont last.

 

This is the same sectarian attitude which will alienate more and more Sunnis.

 

We have a problem if the people in the "Shia-led" government think this way. I hope not.

 

However, the question whether collective Sunni mindset is opposed to Shias being in position of power and influence in Arab countries hitherto ruled for centuries by Sunni orthodoxy is a good one to ask.

 

Do Sunnis see themselves as naturally the dominant and the Shia the dominated and so do not or can not want to accept the change in that balance? This, too, is a very pertinent question to ask.

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Thurs,19June14:

 

al-Alam is reporting: Advance to Mosul being prepared by Iraqi Army; US F-18 flying surveillance missions; and the FSA in Syria is to swear allegiance to ISIS.

 

The report says a group of FSA commanders have pledged allegiance; not the entire FSA.

This is essentially a conversion instead of an allegiance since the FSA are also fighting ISIS for the most part.

It also wouldn't make sense for the whole of FSA to pledge allegiance to ISIS since America provides them with weapons; joining with what America considers an enemy would surely cease that supply and make them begin to reevaluate Syria (the facade is that America are helping 'moderate' Syrian 'rebels', take that 'moderate-ness' away and their policy on Syria will dramatically change)

 

It is interesting to note how Sunnis that take up arms against Shias/Alawites/Iran/Rafidas gravitate towards terrorist groups that are increasingly more violent and sectarian and anti-Shia in philiosphy (like ISIS).

Edited by mayf321d
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Da3sh want zawaj nakiah now,and they have raped a couple of woman from mossal. I saw the victums on al iraqiah tv, I bet that the people that opened their doors to da3sh didnt see this coming.. They will rape and kill even their own supporters.

I hope malki stays in his position and doesnt back down, al nasar is for the iraqi people inshallah.

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This is the same sectarian attitude which will alienate more and more Sunnis.

 

We have a problem if the people in the "Shia-led" government think this way. I hope not.

 

However, the question whether collective Sunni mindset is opposed to Shias being in position of power and influence in Arab countries hitherto ruled for centuries by Sunni orthodoxy is a good one to ask.

 

Do Sunnis see themselves as naturally the dominant and the Shia the dominated and so do not or can not want to accept the change in that balance? This, too, is a very pertinent question to ask.

yes, sunnis believe they have the right to rule because of what happened in history. What's problematic about it is that not only do they believe they have a divine right to rule & represent islam but they also believe that they can themselves designate their own leader by any means necessary & that this is divinely sanctioned. Seeking any meaningful co operation with the sunni community is futile at this point because it's the most influential among them which determines the narrative of the community & the most influential among them is Saudi Arabia - who genuinely hate shi'ism & is actually pursuing a plan of combining scaring the shi'i majority population into submission & ethnically cleansing the population into submission if it doesnt work. Bahrain was subdued more easily. The good part of this crisis is that saudi arabia is now seemingly in direct conflict with USA but it's strange to see how USA was so Quick to advocate a regime change in Iraq even though Maliki was even more popular for this latest term among the majority. Up to 70% of iraqis were positive about the future before the election according to polling but in Anbar only 40% saw a future at all & even less would accept a democratic outcome. That's just the mentality of the sunni community as it appears today.

A sectarian war has already been ignited. I see absolutely no will for cooperation among any sunni leaders who have real influence in the arab world influence & it's sad to watch shi'ites try & try & try & try.. This war will go on getting worse until Syria or Iraq has fallen into the control of sunnis. Regardless of the consequences, saudi arabia will go "all in" against Iran through any proxy available & if it isnt stopped forcefully it will have very very severe consequences for the middle east, for the muslim western relations & for islam itself. A nation such as Pakistan, who experiences chaos after the Afghan Soviet war will have even more chaos & I believe similar instability in the form of sporadic terror attacks will spread anywhere where sunni's (salafis) live.

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The iraqi pre election poll which clearly shows that the sunni arab minority is the problem & doesnt view the iraqi political process as legitimate. Follow the link & you'll see some truly worrying numbers: https://www.ndi.org/files/GQR-Iraq-Survey-Jan-Mar-2014.pdf

Iraqis appear to be more positive about where their country is heading than they were last fall, according to the findings of a new NDI pre-election survey conducted from January to early March. Of those surveyed, 41 percent believe the country is headed in the right direction, a 10 point increase from NDI’s last public opinion poll in September.

The nationwide poll comes just weeks before national elections—the first to be held since the U.S. troop withdrawal. On April 30, Iraqis are scheduled to elect a new 328-member Council of Representatives (CoR), which will ultimately elect a new prime minister, president and cabinet. In addition, the poll provides critical insight ahead of provincial council elections in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), also scheduled for April 30.

Developed by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner (GQR) and NDI, the poll gauged public sentiment on a range of issues. In total, 2,000 face-to-face interviews were conducted, representing a broad cross-section of Iraqis from geographically and ethnically disparate provinces. NDI previously commissioned GQR to conduct nationwide opinion polls in February and September 2013.

The poll revealed that a majority of Iraqis (65 percent) rated democracy as “the best form of government” and a greater share (72 percent) regarded elections as a “good thing” for Iraq. In addition, the results showed 75 percent of Iraqis were more “enthusiastic about voting in this April’s parliamentary elections compared to previous elections.” Despite that growing enthusiasm, sentiments in the Sunni-dominated West remain tempered, with 58 percent questioning the legitimacy of the upcoming election.

While entrenched sectarian divisions continue to color Iraq’s political climate, the country’s improved mood has been largely driven by perceived improvements in basic services. A majority of Iraqis said electricity (66 percent), education (56 percent), and cost of living (55 percent) were steadily improving.

Across Iraq, voters are likely to be swayed by political parties and candidates who focus on issue-based platforms that produce tangible results for average Iraqis. A plurality of voters voiced support for policies that provide access to loans for small businesses (42 percent), improve the quality of teachers (46 percent), and decrease the cost of medicine (37 percent). However, the public was equally divided over whether policies should, overall, focus on long-term issues, such as infrastructure, or immediate concerns, such as job creation.

While attitudes toward the direction of the country improved in all regions, the Sunni-dominated West (Anbar, Ninewa, Salahaddin, and Kirkuk) and the Kurdish North continued to have an overall pessimistic outlook. The survey found 70 percent in the West and 59 percent in the North thought Iraq was heading in the wrong direction; both regions had a majority (54 and 56 percent respectively) that viewed Iraq as a divided country. Reflecting overall doubts regarding the credibility of the upcoming electoral process, the West was also the least enthusiastic region about the upcoming elections, with just 49 percent expressing more enthusiasm for “April’s parliamentary election compared to previous elections.”

Although voter turnout in April is expected to be similar to previous elections at 63 percent, fears about personal security and a lack of trust in the integrity of the elections are expected to keep voters from going to the polls. Of the 37 percent of Iraqis who are unlikely to vote, 37 percent did not believe they would feel safe when voting whereas 31 percent felt the elections would not be free and fair. Some 58 percent of Iraqis in the West shared the sentiment that elections would not be free and fair.

https://www.ndi.org/iraq-survey-findings-march-2014

I dont think Iraq can exist as a stable nation with democracy because I dont think sunnis in Iraq can ever accept living in a nation ruled by a non sunni. The problem can perhaps be postponed by skillful political posturing or bribing the population but it can only be solved by war.

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I was watching Obomb'em's press conference today -the 19th, Thursday- and again on the news.

 

What struck me was his pronouncement that the US didn't want to appear taking sides. 

 

Huh?

 

The enemy is ISIS/ISIL , who are the enemy of Sunni, Shi'a and Christian, clerics and diplomats.

 

? So how is it that the US can "identify" and drone-murder targets in Pakistan, walking around buildings, but cannot identify targets in pick-up trucks in Iraq and Syria  ? 

 

Maybe, the US fantasizes it can control the "kaliphate" their ex-con murders (ISIS) is trying to form.

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In my opinion

I really think we need to start seeing some results from the Iraqi government now. They seem to be playing catch up; although the momentum has changed (and ISIS's 'lightning advance' has been heavily slowed) the government needs to start making some serious gains. Nothing substantial overnight, but serious gains enough to stop ISIS from attracting those weak-willed people that flock to who they consider will be the winning side. Also consider that the Iraqi army is better trained than the new recruits and volunteers coming in, yet they have only a light presence in all of this (what I gather from the media), so we are left to depend on the relatively untrained volunteers to fight the Syrian-veteran ISIS insurgents.

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Also, residents seem to forget the daily bombings that have occurred in Iraq are from ISIS who targeted (mostly) Shia and Sunni neighbourhoods.

And Sunnis have been executed in Mosul for not paying alligence to ISIS - there was a report of a Sunni cleric having suffered this fate.

Reports are also surfacing about the mistreatment of Sunnis in Mosul at the hands of ISIS; rape, beheadings, cutting off hands, general harassment. Although reports like these are a lot of the time a product of propaganda by the opposition, given the track record of extremist groups like these, as well as their philosophy, there is most likely a great deal of truth in them.

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In my opinion

I really think we need to start seeing some results from the Iraqi government now. They seem to be playing catch up; although the momentum has changed (and ISIS's 'lightning advance' has been heavily slowed) the government needs to start making some serious gains. Nothing substantial overnight, but serious gains enough to stop ISIS from attracting those weak-willed people that flock to who they consider will be the winning side. Also consider that the Iraqi army is better trained than the new recruits and volunteers coming in, yet they have only a light presence in all of this (what I gather from the media), so we are left to depend on the relatively untrained volunteers to fight the Syrian-veteran ISIS insurgents.

 

This is probably where the Abul Fazl Abbas Brigade or Hizballah would come in handy as they now have experience fighting these scum.

 

Also... I have noticed some posts referring to the takfiris as dogs... I am sorry but that is an unacceptable insult. Please refrain from insulting these noble canine animals by comparing them to takfiris.

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This is probably where the Abul Fazl Abbas Brigade or Hizballah would come in handy as they now have experience fighting these scum.

 

Also... I have noticed some posts referring to the takfiris as dogs... I am sorry but that is an unacceptable insult. Please refrain from insulting these noble canine animals by comparing them to takfiris.

 

Hezbollah, as powerful, motivated and experienced as they are, are already very stretched out due to the Syrian civil war. Their intervention as a result may not have the game-changing impact as it did with Syria.

The other Shia miltias are more concerned with keeping the Holy shrines safe than they are in fighting to reclaim 'Sunni' Iraqi territory in the north. This is the government's job; in fact, the Sayed's (HA) fatwa told people to defend the Holy shrines, NOT fight the government's war. It is up to the Iraqi army to retake territory lost to the insurgents, not those that are defending the Holy shrines.

 

My opinion:

Given that peoples' loyalties have been exposed, the Iraqi government can root out dissent and disobedience and as a result bring about a more refined Iraqi army that hopefully will be (well SHOULD be considering their quantity and American training in the past) able to uproot the insurgency. If not, we are going to end up in a situation where ISIS remains where they are because they cannot advance into Baghdad/Karbala/Najaf/Samarra due to the miltias and the inability of the Iraqi army to fight to reclaim previously lost territory. If this remains, it will result in civil war (the longer this problem stays around, the more and more people begin to perceive it as sectarian).

 

This is why I said before, the Iraqi army NEEDS to step up and begin making some serious advances. The Sayed's fatwa has bought them time and strength (a lot of volunteers joined the army too).

Edited by mayf321d
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daf2deb28429a1da5376d9ac212e2776.jpg

 

in falloujah, 300 guns with the Jordanian army stamp on them been collected from the defeated ISIS.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y1vkTd2D8w

Kurdish peshmergah fight back ISIS.

 

 

10313338_746425875409887_649487076472468

Him and 8 from his family been martyred in defense of their home land Tal Afar

 

And for those worried about the Iraqi army capability, the army is a millionth army and is capable alone. So far the volunteers did not reach the war front or not in large numbers yet, they should enroll and be trained by the army as per Syed Sistani fatwah. Iran saw that Iraqis can defend their homeland so they sat back ready and prepared to intervene when needed. The Iranian spy planes (without pilot) been covering the sky of Iraq since day one, providing the Iraqi army with accurate informations about the where abouts of ISIS.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=780970748614037

 

Iraqi army airstrikes :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LulWLdMMWDg

 

Iraqi army taking control of Is'haqi area, cleaning it from ISIS

Edited by IbnSohan
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Allen West Claims Obama is Creating a Saudi-Iranian Islamic Caliphate, Blames his "Eastern Orientation".

 

http://www.rightwingwatch.org/content/allen-west-claims-obama-creating-saudi-iranian-islamic-caliphate-blames-his-eastern-orientat

 

hahahah :D, what an absurd statement. Iranians would never allow such "caliphate" to happen.

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