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In the Name of God بسم الله

Arabic Words - Query


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  • Veteran Member

Salam


 


I got 3 questions more, may Allah reward you.


 


 


1. What's the difference between "bil" and "fil" let me give an example:


 


In the quran


"Fil quran"


"Bil quran"


 


What's the difference?


 


 


2. If you say "sign" in iraqi-arabic, how do you say it? I.e "it is a sign for a believer".


 


3. How do you say "grow" i.e let your beard grow?


 

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Salam

 

I got 3 questions more, may Allah reward you.

 

 

1. What's the difference between "bil" and "fil" let me give an example:

 

In the quran

"Fil quran"

"Bil quran"

 

What's the difference?

 

 

Bismillah

 

Wa`alaykum asSalam, 

 

Depends on where and how the two are used. 

 

ب has many more meanings than في

 

Sometimes the first is used to mean the same thing as في and other times (probably in most cases) it means something else. 

 

So for example in some prayers  you ask that Allah enlighten/purify your heart بالقران - through the Qur'an (by way of the Qur'an). 

 

If you bring specific ayaat we can examine them individually inshallah. 

 

I'll leave your other q's to our friends who are experts in sha`bi.

;)

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  • Advanced Member

 

Salam

 

I got 3 questions more, may Allah reward you.

 

 

1. What's the difference between "bil" and "fil" let me give an example:

 

In the quran

"Fil quran"

"Bil quran"

 

What's the difference?

 

 

2. If you say "sign" in iraqi-arabic, how do you say it? I.e "it is a sign for a believer".

 

3. How do you say "grow" i.e let your beard grow?

 

1- "fil" and "bil" are basically the same thing, according to how I see it.

2- 'Alamat al-Mu'min

3- Grow can have many words in arabic. It can be ''Takbar'' i.e. get bigger. Or "Tanmoo'' i.e. development, or "Izdada'' or ''Zada'' i.e. Increased.

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  • Veteran Member

Bro, I don't read arabic, so I don't what these arabic words mean..

How come you don't read arabic? Why? tell me one good reason, why? How hard is it?  it is just 28 characters, as much as the number of cartoons that you remember all their characters names, so why not arabic letters? What Quran do you read heh? 

 

lol joking

 

Fi = in

bi= by 

fil Quran = in quran

bilQuran = by Quran

this is really basic arabic, even f you don't read arabic, if arabic is your parents language this should be obvious for you to tell the difference erm unless you are Iraqi of course. Iraqis tend to add bi to everything and da also "da terid tro7 elmasij bi hayi esayarah bi atrajak raja illa takhdhini ma3ak "

Edited by Chaotic Muslem
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  • Veteran Member

How come you don't read arabic? Why? tell me one good reason, why? How hard is it?  it is just 28 characters, as much as the number of cartoons that you remember all their characters names, so why not arabic letters? What Quran do you read heh? 

 

lol joking

 

Fi = in

bi= by 

fil Quran = in quran

bilQuran = by Quran

this is really basic arabic, even f you don't read arabic, if arabic is your parents language this should be obvious for you to tell the difference erm unless you are Iraqi of course. Iraqis tend to add bi to everything and da also "da grid tro7 elmasij bi hayi esayarah bi atrajak raja illa takhdhini ma3ak "

 

aw

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  • Veteran Member

(salam)

 

How would you translate this phrase?

 

 

أوصيكم بتقوى الله و إدامة التفكرفإن التفكر أبو كل الخير و أمه

 

 

and continuance/persistence of thought/reflection?

 

 

Thanks

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(salam)

 

How would you translate this phrase?

 

 

أوصيكم بتقوى الله و إدامة التفكرفإن التفكر أبو كل الخير و أمه

 

 

and continuance/persistence of thought/reflection?

 

 

Thanks

 

بسم الله

و عليكم السلام

 

I feel that all of those fit well. 

 

What came to my mind was; continuity of thought or continuous thinking (although the latter sounds very simplistic and not so eloquent in english, i feel it relays the meaning well).

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  • Veteran Member

 

بسم الله

و عليكم السلام

 

I feel that all of those fit well. 

 

What came to my mind was; continuity of thought or continuous thinking (although the latter sounds very simplistic and not so eloquent in english, i feel it relays the meaning well).

 

 

السلام عليكم

شكرا لك اخي

مع السلامة

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  • Veteran Member

(salam)

 

وبإسناده عن الحسن بن محبوب، عن أبي الصباح الكناني قال: قلت:
لأبي عبد الله (عليه السلام): ما تقول فيمن أحدث في المسجد الحرام متعمدا؟ قال: يضرب رأسه ضربا شديدا، ثم قال: ما تقول فيمن أحدث في الكعبة متعمدا؟ يقتل

 

How is أحدث translated in this context? To drop excrement ?

Edited by Ali_Hussain
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  • Advanced Member

Bismillah

 

What's the context? al-Muqta' can have more than one meaning.

 

By the right of Hussain over you (By Hussain's right upon you), follow the...

  

What does this mean:

 

بحق الحسين عليكم ،،، تابعوا المقطع

"Al-Maqta" here probably is referring to a video or a clip. Especially when the second part of the statement says; "...Tabi'o Al-Maqta' " which is translated as "....watch the video".

The entire statement can be translated as: "By the right of Hussain(AS) over you, follow(watch) this video".

ws

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  • Veteran Member

السلام عليكم و رحمة الله

 

 

 

و لمحمد صلى الله عليه و اله ذخرا و مزيدا

 

What is a more accurate translation for this line?

 

This is the one from duas.com:

 

And to be safety and increasing honor for Muhammad—peace of Allah be upon him and his Household—

 

But I'm not finding safety as a meaning for ذخر

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اسألك بحق هذا اليوم الذي جعلته للمسلمين عيدا، و لمحمد صلى الله عليه و آله و سلم ذخراً و شرفا و كرامة ومزيداً،

 

I ask You by the right of this day that you made it for Muslims an Eid, and made it for Muhammad and his household a treasure , A sharif, a karmah and more ( of your blessings upon them )

 

 

Thakhara ذخر

Kept something for later use, treasure something. For example, the animals keep food in Summer for use in winter (يدخرون)

People's savings in banks are called Mudakharat مدخرات

The box of bullets is called thakhirah ذخيرة

Edited by IbnSohan
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  • Veteran Member

Can the word "mushrik" be used for other purposes in arabic?

 

I mean that Allah (swt) says in the Quran for instance that "Thumma qeela lahum ayna ma kuntum tushrikoon"

 

 

 

Could this verse, and the word "tushrik", mean something else instead for idol-worship?

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  • Advanced Member

Salam

I got 3 questions more, may Allah reward you.

1. What's the difference between "bil" and "fil" let me give an example:

In the quran

"Fil quran"

"Bil quran"

What's the difference?

2. If you say "sign" in iraqi-arabic, how do you say it? I.e "it is a sign for a believer".

3. How do you say "grow" i.e let your beard grow?

As far as I know bil and fil are similar.

However in collquial street arabic as opposed to formal arabic we (as in lebanese) use bil always.

Fil would be the formal way to say it

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Can the word "mushrik" be used for other purposes in arabic?

 

I mean that Allah ÓÈÍÇäå æÊÚÇáì says in the Quran for instance that "Thumma qeela lahum ayna ma kuntum tushrikoon"

 

 

 

Could this verse, and the word "tushrik", mean something else instead for idol-worship?

 

Bismillah

 

The purpose it is being used in this verse is to speak about attributing partners to Allah. The partners do not always have to be in form of idols. God is asking the people He is subjecting to punishment to bring those whom they made partners with the Lord - it seems that this does not necessarily mean believing in Allah and another deity, but rather could be referring to someone who believes in other deities altogether (that wouldn't be considered a monotheistic God). 

 

Wa Allahu `Aaalim

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  • Veteran Member

Bismillah

 

The purpose it is being used in this verse is to speak about attributing partners to Allah. The partners do not always have to be in form of idols. God is asking the people He is subjecting to punishment to bring those whom they made partners with the Lord - it seems that this does not necessarily mean believing in Allah and another deity, but rather could be referring to someone who believes in other deities altogether (that wouldn't be considered a monotheistic God). 

 

Wa Allahu `Aaalim

 

Could a person, perhaps, use it in formal speech? Or would that be dodgy?

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  • Veteran Member
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