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In the Name of God بسم الله

North Korea:south's President A Crafty Prostitute

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North Korea labels South's president as 'crafty prostitute' after Obama visit

 

Tirade against Park Geun-hye hits new low in unusually personal abuse, which analysts say may indicate Kim Jong-un echoing his grandfather

 

North Korea has launched a vitriolic attack on the South Korean president, comparing her to "crafty prostitute" in thrall to her "pimp" Barack Obama.

 

It also described Park Geun-hye as America's "comfort woman", a reference likely to enrage many in South Korea, where anger still runs high over the plight of thousands of women who were enslaved in Japanese military brothels during the second world war.

 

The comments were issued on Sunday by the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea (CPRK), which handles cross-border affairs, following the US president's two-day visit to Seoul. He arrived in Malaysia on Sunday for the penultimate stop on his four-nation tour of Asia.

 

While Pyongyang is known for its aggressive rhetoric, recent remarks have been unusually personal.

 

Earlier this month state media ran misogynist articles, including one headlined "We accuse Park the [Edited Out]", labelling her as a lunatic, idiot and "cold-blooded animal" and emphasising the fact that she has never married or had children.

 

Those remarks were presented in the form of quotes from ordinary North Koreans, while the latest tirade, carried by state news agency KCNA, is presented as a statement from an official body.

 

It comes days after a homophobic diatribe which described the head of a United Nations commission on human rights in North Korea as a "disgusting old lecher". Pyongyang was angered by the team's report, which said it was committing grave and systematic human rights abuses on a scale unparalleled in the modern world.

 

"What Park did before Obama this time reminds one of an indiscreet girl who earnestly begs a gangster to beat someone or a capricious [Edited Out] who asks her fancy man [pimp] to do harm to other person while providing sex to him," North Korea's CPRK said.

 

Obama and Park had warned Pyongyang it could face strengthened sanctions if it detonated a fourth nuclear device, after North Korea said it could carry out a new kind of test. Satellite imagery has shown increased activity at a test site.

 

Those remarks "laid bare her despicable true colours as a wicked sycophant and traitor, a dirty comfort woman for the US and despicable prostitute selling off the nation," said the CPRK.

 

It said the trip had shown North Korea was right to have concluded it should deal with the US "by force only, not just talking, and should finally settle accounts with it through an all-out nuclear showdown".

 

The committee also accused Obama of being "utterly indifferent to the sorrow of South Koreans" over the sinking of the Sewol ferry, which has left more than 300 people, including many children, missing or dead.

 

"Had Obama even an iota of ethics and morality, he should have postponed or shelved his trip," it said.

 

The US president expressed his condolences and offered South Korea any help required within 24 hours of the disaster. In contrast, North Korea expressed no sympathy until a full week later.

 

The statement also suggested that Park would be assassinated like her father, the late South Korean dictator Park Chung-hee. "Genes remain unchanged," it said.

 

But experts do not believe the attacks are propelled by lingering animosity towards her father.

 

"It's not so much about her personally, but rather a symbol of a new rhetoric … I think this is an attempt to use the same kind of emotional abuse as [Kim Jong-un's] grandfather," said Tatiana Gabroussenko, an expert on the regime's ideology and propaganda at Korea University in Seoul.

 

She said that while North Korea always attacked its southern neighbour's politicians, the "loud, personalised" tone of recent abuse seemed to echo the approach of the 1950s and early 60s. It might be part of emphasising his likeness to his grandfather, with a return to "proletarian candour", she said.

 

"That was something used in Kim Il-sung's time and applauded; it meant he was 'one of us', not an elite intellectual, speaking from his heart," she added.

 

John Delury of Yonsei University described the remarks as "a new low point in the misogyny".

 

He added that Pyongyang's "deeply counterproductive" methods showed how ignorant it was of South Korea.

 

"There are deep fractures in South Korea and a lot of ways that North Korea could manipulate that," he said.

 

Using the "comfort women" comparison in particular touched on an extremely sensitive issue, not only insulting Park but also the survivors of the second world war brothels, he noted.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/27/north-korea-attacks-south-president-park-geun-hye-obama
 

 

It said the trip had shown North Korea was right to have concluded it should deal with the US "by force only, not just talking, and should finally settle accounts with it through an all-out nuclear showdown".

 

 

 

I can't wait to see that.

Edited by Ali_Hussain
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This quote right here:

 

 

Earlier this month state media ran misogynist articles, including one headlined "We accuse Park the [Edited Out]", labelling her as a lunatic, idiot and "cold-blooded animal" and emphasising the fact that she has never married or had children.

 

This illustrates the true difference between North and South Korea.

 

North Korea has retained traditional Confucian values, where South Korea has descended into a cultural abyss.

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Hello,

 

^  :no:

 

Let me get this straight Brother Jackson, a North Korean State run media/propoganda outlet calls a foreign head of state a lunatic, an idiot and a cold blooded animal.  And, the head of state being referred to has never married or had children.  Therefore, according to you, North Korea is to be admired for retaining "traditional Confucian values" and South Korea has slid into a "cultural abyss?"

 

We all know you are a North Korea fan.  But, sometimes, in my opinion, it is best just to keep quite instead of making such a ludicrous statement.

 

All the Best,

David

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^ Hello,

 

You can't embolden 20 percent of the quote that marginally supports your conclusion and ignore the remaining 80 percent that blows your conclusion away. 

 

It don't quite work that way my friend.  :D

 

All the Best,

David

Edited by David66
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Real Shia's Love DPRK. They are the allies of Ahlubayt. They support Jaysh Al-Mahdi. They give Hezballah Money and weapons and they send Artillery to Syrian Gov and also Officers to command Syrian Army. They also are close with Iran. May Allah bless the citizens of the DPRK and Allah bless Kim Jung Un.

 

okay i don't post a lot on this website but your post made me think... No way are they the allies of the Ahlulbayt they just play the game of politics and they are trying to play it good by softening up, but there is no way north korea would tolerate islam in it's own country.

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okay i don't post a lot on this website but your post made me think... No way are they the allies of the Ahlulbayt they just play the game of politics and they are trying to play it good by softening up, but there is no way north korea would tolerate islam in it's own country.

 

Your opinion means nothing because Islam has no roots in Korea.

 

You can't accuse a country with no Islamic roots, of persecuting/suppressing Islam.

 

But we do have some basis for making inferences that Islam WOULD be tolerated in the DPRK. This basis is the fact that Christianity is tolerated. In spite of the fact that Christian missionaries have always played a role in cultural subversion and imperialism in East Asia, the DPRK accepts Christianity as a legitimate religion and there are churches in the DPRK where Christians can practice their faith.

 

Islam, which doesn't have such a dark history in East Asia, would surely be given at least equal treatment.

 

Moreover, we have statements from Mohsen Rafighdoost (who was in charge of procuring arms imports into Iran during the war) that reflect Kim Il-sung's favorable view of Islam. Rafighdoost had become very close with Kim Il-sung throughout the war, so this is a pretty big insight into some private conversations with Kim.

 

But that's besides the point. Islam has no roots in Korea and therefore we cannot judge Korea based on its acceptance or rejection of Islam. That's like asking some Turkaman goat herder about his taste in hamburgers.

 

Ultimately, you are speaking from ignorance. So your opinion on this issue means nothing.

 

The DPRK has been dipped so deep into rhetoric and slogans that even Shias are buying into the nonsense. Here we have a country which is upholding its traditions, which is standing against imperialism at the cost of its own material well-being (to an degree which we Iranians, or even the South Lebanese would in all likelihood not withstand), which has 1001 commonalities with us in terms of their ideals and values... and yet we have the same opinion of them that CNN or BBC tells us to have. Quite sad.

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Your opinion means nothing because Islam has no roots in Korea.

 

You can't accuse a country with no Islamic roots, of persecuting/suppressing Islam.

 

But we do have some basis for making inferences that Islam WOULD be tolerated in the DPRK. This basis is the fact that Christianity is tolerated. In spite of the fact that Christian missionaries have always played a role in cultural subversion and imperialism in East Asia, the DPRK accepts Christianity as a legitimate religion and there are churches in the DPRK where Christians can practice their faith.

 

Islam, which doesn't have such a dark history in East Asia, would surely be given at least equal treatment.

 

Moreover, we have statements from Mohsen Rafighdoost (who was in charge of procuring arms imports into Iran during the war) that reflect Kim Il-sung's favorable view of Islam. Rafighdoost had become very close with Kim Il-sung throughout the war, so this is a pretty big insight into some private conversations with Kim.

 

But that's besides the point. Islam has no roots in Korea and therefore we cannot judge Korea based on its acceptance or rejection of Islam. That's like asking some Turkaman goat herder about his taste in hamburgers.

 

Ultimately, you are speaking from ignorance. So your opinion on this issue means nothing.

 

The DPRK has been dipped so deep into rhetoric and slogans that even Shias are buying into the nonsense. Here we have a country which is upholding its traditions, which is standing against imperialism at the cost of its own material well-being (to an degree which we Iranians, or even the South Lebanese would in all likelihood not withstand), which has 1001 commonalities with us in terms of their ideals and values... and yet we have the same opinion of them that CNN or BBC tells us to have. Quite sad.

 

The reason i said that North Korea was because it is still a government of communism not because of ignorance.. And if you remember the restrictions of islam in the soviet union, i jumped the gun by saying that it wouldn't be tolerated but there would be some sort of restrictions upon it. 

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North Korea is an oppressive regime that bans the spread of Allah (s.w.t)'s Religion. Kim Jong Un himself is a tyrant, and his people are poor and starving. I remember once he built a FAILED bomb for a lot of money, that FAILED bomb could of fed his people for a year.

No support for secular tyrants like this.

Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (a.s) said - On the Day of Resurrection, a pavilion of fire will be made in which the supporters of the oppressors will be put, and nails of iron will be made for them scratching with it beginning with their hearts. So they will say: Our Lord, did we not worship You? He said: So He will say: Yea, however you were supporters for the oppressors.

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^ What are you talking about?

 

DPRK is friend of Iran

Iran = Islam

 

Hence,

 

DPRK is friend of Islam


But in all seriousness this whole DPRK vs Islam discourse is irrelevant. The DPRK-Iran ties are not based on sharing of common values for they are oceans apart (literally) but the presence of a common threat that is the US.... the enemy of my enemy is my friend sorta logic.

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^ What are you talking about?

DPRK is friend of Iran

Iran = Islam

Hence,

DPRK is friend of Islam

But in all seriousness this whole DPRK vs Islam discourse is irrelevant. The DPRK-Iran ties are not based on sharing of common values for they are oceans apart (literally) but the presence of a common threat that is the US.... the enemy of my enemy is my friend sorta logic.

I'm not going to be blinded by your logic.

And do not mix up the truth with the falsehood, nor hide the truth while you know (it).[2:42][Qur'an]

Islam = Truth

Falsehood = Secular Communism

Truth and falsehood are to be seperated. Just because they are an enemy of the bigger evil (U.S) this doesn't mean Shia should help them. Look at HAMAS right now, years of funding and training for no reason. They are allied with the terrorists in Syria now.

Edited by DaBeast313
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Islam has a long history in Korea in both the North and The South All Revolutionary Minded Shia Muslims from Around The World Should Support  North Korea and Its Pro Islamic Government under Kim Jong Un

Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (a.s) said - On the Day of Resurrection, a pavilion of fire will be made in which the supporters of the oppressors will be put, and nails of iron will be made for them scratching with it beginning with their hearts. So they will say: Our Lord, did we not worship You? He said: So He will say: Yea, however you were supporters for the oppressors.

---

It is obvious Kim Jong Un oppresses people.

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But in all seriousness this whole DPRK vs Islam discourse is irrelevant. The DPRK-Iran ties are not based on sharing of common values for they are oceans apart (literally) but the presence of a common threat that is the US.... the enemy of my enemy is my friend sorta logic.

 

Common values can't span oceans

 

Brilliant.

 

Thank you, Wahdat, for this brilliant analysis yet again.

I'm not going to be blinded by your logic.

And do not mix up the truth with the falsehood, nor hide the truth while you know (it).[2:42][Qur'an]

Islam = Truth

Falsehood = Secular Communism

Truth and falsehood are to be seperated. Just because they are an enemy of the bigger evil (U.S) this doesn't mean Shia should help them. Look at HAMAS right now, years of funding and training for no reason. They are allied with the terrorists in Syria now.

 

Don't be silly. Getting caught up in meaningless labels, trying to make out the DPRK to be some sort of atheistic country because of your own (mis)understanding of their political system.

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Common values can't span oceans

 

Brilliant.

 

Thank you, Wahdat, for this brilliant analysis yet again.

 

I have the feeling that there is a need to draw you pictures from now on. What do you say?

 

The problem with Iranians or Iran I find is that they are absolutist and everything is black and white. While Shah was in power, then Islam was bad and Muslims were persecuted. When Islamists came to power everything turned around. And tomorrow when the Nationalists would come to power then everything would turn upside down. It might be news to you but there is a big swathe of grey in politics or international relations. Write that down.

Don't be silly. Getting caught up in meaningless labels, trying to make out the DPRK to be some sort of atheistic country because of your own (mis)understanding of their political system.

 

What difference does it make if DPRK was an atheistic country or otherwise? Would that change Iran's dealing with it? What about Russia? What about President Assad who openly denounces political Islam? What about Venezuela? Is Iran's ties with it based on religion or geopolitics? oh and not to mention the Communist Cuba. For Iran religion is irrelevant, what is relevant is a country's anti-American stance.

Last but not least- the Communist China.

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Common values can't span oceans

 

Brilliant.

 

Thank you, Wahdat, for this brilliant analysis yet again.

 

Don't be silly. Getting caught up in meaningless labels, trying to make out the DPRK to be some sort of atheistic country because of your own (mis)understanding of their political system.

Hahaha. What a reply. Prove me to me that North Korea is not a secular and communist state? Did you read the hadith I posted? Look what Allah (s.w.t) will do to the supporters of the oppressors.

Bashar al-Assad = Secular tyrant, kills his own people.

Kim Jong Un = Secular tyrant, starves his own people for the sake of millitary power.

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Hahaha. What a reply. Prove me to me that North Korea is not a secular and communist state? Did you read the hadith I posted? Look what Allah (s.w.t) will do to the supporters of the oppressors.

Bashar al-Assad = Secular tyrant, kills his own people.

Kim Jong Un = Secular tyrant, starves his own people for the sake of millitary power.

 

Firstly, you cannot apply the word "secular" in the context of East Asia in the same manner that you can apply that term in the West or in the Islamic world.

 

In East Asia, the entire concept of religious exclusivity is rather flimsy and weak. Meaning, they have their traditional folk religions, and then they have Buddhism, and they have an overarching Confucian ethos that permeates their societies. But ultimately, it is not like us where we have everyone in a clearly defined group. In addition to that, all of these forces (the folk religions, Buddhism, and Confucianism) have a much more substantial influence on East Asian societies, than Islam has on our societies. Islam is on our tongue, sure, but Confucianism is deep within the hearts of the Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese.

 

So in their case, it is not like they had some kind of sharia and then it was replaced with Western secularism. Rather, they had a pervasive cultural force (Confucianism) which was not religious per se, and after their "Westernization" their societies continue to be influenced by this force.

 

This is why the (South) Korean scholar Mun Woong Lee says that the North Korean political system is in fact a Neo-Confucian one. Because out of all of the countries in East Asia, the DPRK is the one whose Confucian characteristics are most obvious. For example, when Kim Il-sung died, it was not until three years later that Kim Jong-il assumed any official position of power. (Traditional Confucian mourning period for one's parents is three years).

 

Which brings us to the second part of your "point." Communism. It is true that the DPRK's economic system is one dominated by the state, thus making "communist" an accurate way to describe it. However, North Korea is not an orthodox Marxist-Leninist state. It doesn't even claim to be one. There is no reference to Marxism-Leninism in the North Korea constitution, nor in the public education system. There are no portraits of Marx or Lenin in the country. In fact, I would venture to guess that most North Koreans barely know who Lenin was. The DPRK is an inward-looking country; they argue for their legitimacy not in Marxist-Leninist terms but in Korean terms. The DPRK is Korea on steroids. The DPRK is a state founded on Korean nationalism which just so happened to choose socialism as a mode of national construction. After North Korea attained stability and welfare in 1960s, this is when a process began whereby the international socialist cause was de-emphasized. (And by the 1970s, North Korea was conducting more trade with non-socialist countries than with socialist ones)

 

So to summarize:

1) The word "secular" is misleading in the East Asian context because they have followed a different historical path than the Abrahamic traditions.

2) The word "communism" is misleading because North Korea cannot be defined in the same terms as Eastern Europe or the USSR. It is a very unique country with unique conditions.

 

 

I recommend that you make less use of slogans and terms which lack substance, and instead think, reflect, and study.

 

 

^ So according to you 

 

Islamic World = Iran + Baathist Syria + Hezbollah?

 

"Baathist Syria." A nonsense way to try to somehow equate Bashar to Saddam when we both know there are no parallels at all.

 

Semantics aside, it is true that the legitimate Islamic political strain in the world today is manifested by Islamic Iran and the Resistance in Lebanon. Support for these forces is indeed support of Islam, even if it is unintentional.

Edited by baradar_jackson
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Firstly, you cannot apply the word "secular" in the context of East Asia in the same manner that you can apply that term in the West or in the Islamic world.

 

In East Asia, the entire concept of religious exclusivity is rather flimsy and weak. Meaning, they have their traditional folk religions, and then they have Buddhism, and they have an overarching Confucian ethos that permeates their societies. But ultimately, it is not like us where we have everyone in a clearly defined group. In addition to that, all of these forces (the folk religions, Buddhism, and Confucianism) have a much more substantial influence on East Asian societies, than Islam has on our societies. Islam is on our tongue, sure, but Confucianism is deep within the hearts of the Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese.

 

So in their case, it is not like they had some kind of sharia and then it was replaced with Western secularism. Rather, they had a pervasive cultural force (Confucianism) which was not religious per se, and after their "Westernization" their societies continue to be influenced by this force.

 

This is why the (South) Korean scholar Mun Woong Lee says that the North Korean political system is in fact a Neo-Confucian one. Because out of all of the countries in East Asia, the DPRK is the one whose Confucian characteristics are most obvious. For example, when Kim Il-sung died, it was not until three years later that Kim Jong-il assumed any official position of power. (Traditional Confucian mourning period for one's parents is three years).

 

Which brings us to the second part of your "point." Communism. It is true that the DPRK's economic system is one dominated by the state, thus making "communist" an accurate way to describe it. However, North Korea is not an orthodox Marxist-Leninist state. It doesn't even claim to be one. There is no reference to Marxism-Leninism in the North Korea constitution, nor in the public education system. There are no portraits of Marx or Lenin in the country. In fact, I would venture to guess that most North Koreans barely know who Lenin was. The DPRK is an inward-looking country; they argue for their legitimacy not in Marxist-Leninist terms but in Korean terms. The DPRK is Korea on steroids. The DPRK is a state founded on Korean nationalism which just so happened to choose socialism as a mode of national construction. After North Korea attained stability and welfare in 1960s, this is when a process began whereby the international socialist cause was de-emphasized. (And by the 1970s, North Korea was conducting more trade with non-socialist countries than with socialist ones)

 

So to summarize:

1) The word "secular" is misleading in the East Asian context because they have followed a different historical path than the Abrahamic traditions.

2) The word "communism" is misleading because North Korea cannot be defined in the same terms as Eastern Europe or the USSR. It is a very unique country with unique conditions.

 

 

I recommend that you make less use of slogans and terms which lack substance, and instead think, reflect, and study.

 

 

 

"Baathist Syria." A nonsense way to try to somehow equate Bashar to Saddam when we both know there are no parallels at all.

 

Semantics aside, it is true that the legitimate Islamic political strain in the world today is manifested by Islamic Iran and the Resistance in Lebanon. Support for these forces is indeed support of Islam, even if it is unintentional.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_North_Korea

As you can see, Buddhism is only practised by 4.5% of the country, and Confucianism isn't even mentioned as a practising religion. As you can see, most of the country is Atheist and have no belief in The Almighty whatsoever.

Secondly, whatever, however way you look at it, communism is still the country's economic system. It surely isn't the political system that Karl Marx had in mind, nor is it the system that Lenin used when he was in power, but it still is communism. Communism is 100% against Islamic principles, add to that the country has no OFFICIAL RELIGION and is a kafir regime.

So in your summary, you admit that they follow a different path than Islam, or even Christianitu or Judaism. This proves that North Korea is a kafir regime, which means that its laws are not Islamic, or even Abrahamic Laws, and Abrahamic Religion (especially Islam) is the truth, and whatever isn't Islam is falsehood. And falsehood is oppression, since the laws of Allah (s.w.t) are the only true laws.

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^ Bro, you missed the bus.

 

I just explained how in East Asia there is no concept of religious exclusivity and you give me a breakdown of the religious demographics of the DPRK. It's as if you didn't read (or didn't understand) what I had said.

 

Buddhism doesn't have a high proportion of practitioners in Korea because it never has. Not even at the peak of Buddhism in East Asia, when the Tang dynasty was ruling China and the Koryo dynasty was ruling Korea (and both of these dynasties frantically supported the construction of monasteries), were a majority of the peoples of these countries, Buddhists. Again, religion works differently in East Asia than it does in our part of the world. Buddhism is and has long been a powerful religious force in Korea, but it is not the only force at play. There are also the ancient shamanistic traditions.

 

Confucianism is not really a religion so I don't know why you bothered looking for that. Confucianism is an overarching political and social system/culture. The country is not divided into Confucianists, Buddhists, and shamanists so much as these three play complementary roles. (FYI, Kim Il-sung would have shamans perform rituals at the place where one of his sons died, so don't tell me he was some kind of atheist)

 

Consider also the example of Japan. Japan is ostensibly a secular country, with a majority of the people being irreligious. And yet, if you have watched their mainstream popular entertainment, you may notice that there is more talk of God/gods and spirits than in any American show (where supposedly the majority of people are Christian). You may also notice that in the statistics, very few Japanese are categorized as practicing the Shinto religion, or Buddhism, and yet Shinto birth rites and Buddhist burial rites are commonly practiced on the mass level. Do you get where I'm getting at?

 

As for your last paragraph, well if that's your worldview then you won't get very far in discussion. Anything I bring up, and you will automatically declare it as completely illegitimate because it's not Islamic.

 

We're talking about common ideals and common aims in today's world. Many of these are shared between Islamic Iran and the DPRK. (Seyyed Ali Khamenei said as much, during his presidency).

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"Baathist Syria." A nonsense way to try to somehow equate Bashar to Saddam when we both know there are no parallels at all.

 

Bad logic. So since Saddam was a bad person or a bad Baathist then President Assad, who I believe is the only hope for a humane ME, cant be a Baathist?

Semantics aside, it is true that the legitimate Islamic political strain in the world today is manifested by Islamic Iran and the Resistance in Lebanon. Support for these forces is indeed support of Islam, even if it is unintentional.

According to who? according to you and majority of the Shias. Right? But according to most  Sunnis Iran is ruining Islam by politicizing it. Some would assign that place for Iraq, or Saudi, or Egypt. I believe Islam is way too vast and too complex for any one country to claim leadership or declare itself as Islam or Islamic world. So the correct & accurate statement would be DPRK is a friend of Iran and not a friend of Islamic world.

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Well I go by the Holy Qur'an and Hadeeth.

 

Kafir means rejecter. You can't call people kafir if they haven't been introduced to Islam. And you can't judge a nation harshly for not being Muslim when there is no realistic scenario whereby the whole nation could have become Muslim.

 

You're probably from the Middle East or South Asia. How can you basically write off everything the Koreans do as illegitimate in light of their not being Muslim, when you yourself are most likely a Muslim by birthright? It's like when Donald Trump makes fun of poor people, when he himself is only rich because his father was rich.

 

Your self-righteous rhetoric is without substance because firstly, you know very little about the country in question, and secondly, you are judging the country based on your own made-up system of evaluation.

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Kafir means rejecter. You can't call people kafir if they haven't been introduced to Islam. And you can't judge a nation harshly for not being Muslim when there is no realistic scenario whereby the whole nation could have become Muslim.

You're probably from the Middle East or South Asia. How can you basically write off everything the Koreans do as illegitimate in light of their not being Muslim, when you yourself are most likely a Muslim by birthright? It's like when Donald Trump makes fun of poor people, when he himself is only rich because his father was rich.

Your self-righteous rhetoric is without substance because firstly, you know very little about the country in question, and secondly, you are judging the country based on your own made-up system of evaluation.

Kafir does not mean rejector. Kafir means DISBELIEVER. Rafidhi' means rejector, and we are Rawafidh, because we reject falsehood.

I am from the Middle East, Iraq specifically, and I am a Muslim by birth. And I do believe everything North Korea does is illegitimate, as per (The good deeds of disbelievers are like a mirage seen in vast deserts. A thirsty person thinks from a distance that it is water. But when he comes up to it, he cannot find what he expects.) [An-Nur 39]

Any state that does not have Islamic principles is a state of falsehood.

Edited by DaBeast313
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