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30,000 Pakistani Troops For Gulf States

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A report in Roznama Dunya says Pakistan will provide 30,000 troops to GCC

 

 

On March 18, 2014, the king of Bahrain, Sheikh Hamad Bin Isa Al Khalifa, arrived in Pakistan on a three-day visit, which was seen as a move by the Sunni regime of Bahrain to seek military assistance from Pakistan to curb growing protests by the Shia majority in the country.

 

The delegation comprised Bahrain's top leaders, including Deputy Prime Minister Sheikh Mohammad bin Mubarak bin Hamad Al-Khalifa; Chairman of the House of Representatives Khalifa bin Ahmed Al-Dhahrani; Chairman of the Shura Council Ali bin Saleh; Lt. Gen. Sheikh Muhammad bin Isa Al-Khalifa; and Sheikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Salman Al-Khalifa, among others.

 

It should be noted that in recent years Bahrain has witnessed protests by Shia Muslims, who constitute the kingdom's majority population. Currently, soldiers and policemen from Pakistan are hired by the rulers of Bahrain to protect the Sunni monarchy. In the recent past, there were incidents of Pakistani policemen being beaten up in Bahrain.

 

In April 2011, MEMRI released a report titled "Pakistan's Blackwater – Recruitment of 'Mercenaries' for Deployment in Bahrain", which examined how Pakistan's active duty as well as retired security forces were hired by Pakistani jihad-advocating ex-servicemen societies, for deployment in Bahrain.[1]

 

The March 18-20 visit to Pakistan by Bahrain's King Sheikh Hamad Bin Isa Al Khalifa was seen primarily as an attempt to boost bilateral military cooperation, especially as the visit came soon after a visit by Saudi rulers which was also meant to boost Pakistan-Saudi defense cooperation. In February, it emerged that Saudi Arabia had sought Pakistani military forces and weapons for use in Syria.[2]

 

On the subject of the Bahraini king's visit to Pakistan, a number of Pakistani writers and columnists warned Pakistan against supporting the Sunni regimes in the Middle East. On Twitter, noted columnist Raza Rumi warned: "the day is not far when Pakistan will be a member of the Monarchies' Commonwealth – Al Bakistan, Saudi Arabia, & Bahrain!"[3]The name "Al Bakistan" is a pun on Pakistan becoming an Arab country, as the letter "P" isn't available in Arabic and is instead rendered as a "B." Blogger Nilofer Afridi Qazi tweeted: "Pakistan, Bahrain agree to enhance military relationship? What does that mean? We will support suppression of Shia rights/democratic movement?"[4] In a tweet, journalist Raja Arsalan Khan reminded that Pakistan's General Zia-ul-Haq had early in his career led a Jordanian force to crush the Palestinians: "#Pakistan will cooperate with #Bahrain in defense sector. Are we going to reproduce the job executed by #Zia in #Jordan."[5]

 

Roznama Dunya Report: "Bahraini King's Visit To Pakistan Should Be Seen In The Context Of The Middle East As The Region … Where The Shias Are In Majority, And In Conflict With The Sunnis [Who Control Regimes]"

 

According to a report in Roznama Dunya, Pakistan will provide 30,000 Pakistani troops for the defense of the Sunni regimes in the Gulf. The report quoted Saudi Arabia-based Pakistani columnist Rashid Hussain as saying that in the Gulf "there is a buzz that in order to reduce tension in the region, Pakistan will provide at least 30,000 troops for the defense shield force of the Gulf

Cooperation Council, though the officials of the Pakistani foreign ministry are describing the current visit of the king of Bahrain as purely related to trade and business."[6]

 

Currently, bilateral trade between Bahrain and Pakistan stands at $40 million, which is in favor of Bahrain by $8 million dollars, the report noted. According to the report, international affairs expert Dr. Ejaz Hussain said that the "Bahraini king's visit to Pakistan should be seen in the context of the Middle East as the region is rich with Bahraini oil where the Shias are in majority, and in conflict with the Sunnis [who control regimes]."[7]

 

While the Pakistani government has sought to discourage media reports that Pakistan's engagement with Bahrain is aimed at defense cooperation, The News, a leading English-language Pakistani newspaper, headlined its report: "Pakistan, Bahrain agree to enhance military ties."[8] The Urdu-language Roznama Jang published a report titled: "Pakistan, Bahrain Agree To Boost Military Cooperation; 15 Agreements And 2 Pacts Signed."[9]Roznama Express, an Urdu-language daily, carried a front-page headline: "The Bahraini King Visits The Joint Staff Headquarters, Agreement To Boost Military Cooperation."

 

The Express Tribune: "Pakistan Had … Helped Bahrain Set Up Its Naval Forces, And 18 Percent Of The Gulf State's Air Force Comprises Pakistani Personnel"; "Almost 10,000 Pakistanis Are Serving In Security Services Of Bahrain"

 

The following are excerpts from a report by The Express Tribune, a liberal Pakistani daily, on the visit of the Bahraini king:[10]

 

"Pakistan and Bahrain discussed expanding their existing defense cooperation after high-level talks held at the Joint Staff headquarters in the garrison city of Rawalpindi on Wednesday [March 19, 2014]. King of Bahrain Sheikh Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa … visited the Joint Staff headquarters, where he was received by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif along with the chiefs of the three services, including Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif.

 

"During their formal talks, the countries discussed options to strengthen their defense and security cooperation. Historically, Pakistan and Bahrain enjoy strong defense ties. Pakistan had reportedly helped Bahrain set up its naval forces, and 18 percent of the Gulf state's air force comprises Pakistani personnel. It is estimated that almost 10,000 Pakistanis are serving in security services of Bahrain. During the Arab Spring, Bahrain is believed to have hired the services of retired military and police officials [from Pakistan] to quell the revolt.

 

"According to the official statement issued after the talks, the King of Bahrain lauded the professional competence, training, and courage of the defense forces of Pakistan. He said Pakistani armed forces have rendered matchless sacrifices for the defense of the country."

Endnotes:

 

[1] See MEMRI's Inquiry & Analysis Series No. 682, Pakistan's Blackwater – Recruitment of 'Mercenaries' For Deployment In Bahrain, April 6, 2011. The original English of all quotes used in this dispatch has been mildly edited for clarity and standardization.

[2] See MEMRI's Special Dispatches Series No. 5639, Pakistani Dailies: Saudi Arabia Has Asked Pakistan To Dispatch Two Army Divisions To The Kingdom, February 10, 2014. Also see, The New Indian Express, Saudi-Pakistan Threat To India, March 11, 2014.

[3] Twitter.com/Razarumi, March 19, 2014.

[4] Twitter.com/ninoqazi, March 20, 2014.

[5] Twitter.com/RajaArsalanKhan, March 2014.

[6] Roznama Dunya (Pakistan), March 20, 2014.

[7] Roznama Dunya (Pakistan), March 20, 2014.

[8] The News (Pakistan), March 20, 2014.

[9] Roznama Jang (Pakistan), March 20, 2014.

[10] The Express Tribune (Pakistan), March 20, 2014.

 

 

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Pakistan recently received financial aid from Saudi Arabia. Najam Sethi, Pakistani journalist and editor-in-chief of The Friday Times, speculated the reason for this 'brotherly aid' in his show 'Apas ki baat'. According to him, Saudi's not getting desired support from the west regarding its interests in Syria and the neighbouring countries. So the plan is to get weapons and training from Pakistani army. However, Pakistan does not want direct involvement so everything will be catered via neighbouring saudi allies.

 

Pakistan's current Prime Minister, Nawaz Sharif, enjoys respect amongst the Saudi Royal family. He's basically a 'do as told' guy. He has businesses in Saudi and also escaped prosecution after the Royal family sent a letter to the then government of Pakistan to pardon him and send him to Saudi Arabia under the condition that he will not participate in politics for the next 10 years - a condition later broken by Mr Sharif.

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When Nawaz Sharif was elected prime minister every sane observer feared that Pakistan would again have a tilt toward Saudi-led block given Sharifs amicable ties with the "custodians of the Two Holy Places" and that's exactly what's happening. The previous government, despite its incompetence and corruption, at least  cultivated better ties with Iran (a neighbour) and refused to do Saudi's bidding and declined to take sides in what was quickly metamorphosing into a Shia-Sunni fight in the Middle East. No longer.

 

Here's the deal: Pakistan, always cash-strapped, reeling under IMF so called bailout packages, needs a lot of cash to get going. That's what the Saudis and their Gulf friends have aplenty: Dollars. In return, they want the Pakistan Ordnance Factory to churn out heavy weaponry to be airlifted to Jordan, which would then be smuggled into Syria. Apparently the West has baulked from supporting the Al-Qaida affiliated gangs in Syria, that's why the Saudis have turned to Pakistan to procure weapons since they don't make anything themselves.

 

The fatass Bahrain King has asked for in-service military personnel, officers and commandos to be employed in Bahrain with the assistance of Pakistan arm. The army has refused to send its serving soldiers and instead offered retired Pakistani army personnel to spearhead Bahraini forcces.There are already quite a few Pakistani officers in Bahrain. Now there will be more.

 

Amid all this the most farcical thing is that Pakistan itself is burning everyday with Takfiri terrorism. There will be serious repercussions for taking Saudi side and a failure to contain terrorism would be one of them. If just Iran decides to step in and starts pumping in guns and money to Shias who want to take it, you'll have Syria II here.

 

Just when you thought Paki establishment has learned something from the past, you get the renewal of the same policies.

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Isn't it quite pathetic that the gulf dictatorships have to hir pakistani mercenaries to operate the hi-tech fighter jets they've bought in droves from the US?

I Think the fact that these sectarian dictators are resorting to shipping over pakistani Soldiers to quell their populations rightful aspirations is a proof of the inherent weakness of these regimes. They don't even have the capability to keep their own populations down, how could they pose a erious threat to Iran? These regimes are but Shells; there's nothing inside. They represent USA and Israel in foreign policy.

 

Why is Pakistan doing this? I know that anti-americanism is growing in Pakistan because of the drone strikes.

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This is among the fruits of accepting professional liars/politicians as your leaders and having the huge 2500 members strong cluster $h!t pieces of the "democratic process" who are actually all like, devil worshipers. Pakistan is just a name on a map, in reality its just a toilet where various most dangerous pathogens of humanity are allowed to grow.

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This editorial hits the nail on the end. Frank and honest analysis to appear in Pakistan's English newspaper, something Sunnis and ordinary semi-literate Pakis don't know or don't want to know.

 

It's terrible to be a 'dollar-khor' but it's perfectly fine to be a 'riyal-khor', because, the riyals come loaded with the baraka of Islam, straight from the perfumed deserts of the Arabian Peninsula :wub:

 

I have not seen a single bearded clown taking to the streets to protest Saudi 'interference' in Pakistan and to lambast the politicians for 'selling out' the country to a 'foreign power.'

 

Where is Imran khan who is otherwise so keen on establishing Pakistan's 'sovereignty' by refusing foreign largesse? The only party that questioned and criticised these riyals was the PPP.

 

tft-6-p-1-a.jpg

The Saudi Kingdom has granted $1.5b to the Nawaz Sharif government. Another such donation will accrue in due course. A quick fix of $3b is a lot of free money for Pakistan’s forex-strapped economy that is struggling to cope with significant international debt payments. Indeed, the Saudi injection has reversed the rapid fall of the rupee....Why then all the hush-hush about the Good Samaritan who has eventually bailed him out?

Significantly, the PMLN government has been at pains to hide the Saudi largesse. But after we discovered that the cause of the sudden reversal in the fortunes of the rupee was due to an uplifting shot in the arm of the State Bank, we were told not to ask about the “friendly” source and amount of funds. Then, after we found out about the donor, we were told that the Saudi “donation” was a measure of the personal relationship between our prime minister and the Saudi monarch. That is when our happy surprise turned to suspicious incredulity and the game became crystal clear.

A clutch of high-powered Saudis, including the Crown Prince, has descended upon Islamabad in recent weeks. The prime minister and the Pakistan army chief have made unexplained flying visits to the Kingdom. In due course a joint statement or communiqué was issued from Islamabad stressing the demand for a “transitional” government in Syria while emphasizing that there was no change in Pakistan’s position on the issue. Indeed, the foreign office spokesperson, an apparently haughty lady, was quite aggressive in ticking off inquiring hacks who argued that the demand for a transitional government amounted to a veritable “regime change” in Syria and smacked of a definite policy about-turn. Mr Sartaj Aziz, the de facto foreign minister, has also executed some verbal gymnastics to try and obscure the truth. But we, the public, are not stupid or ill-informed. We are not ready to buy this story hook, line and sinker. We know there are no free lunches, let alone free feasts, in relations amongst nations. So what’s the $3b quid pro quo?

The truth is that Pakistan has agreed to supply, among other weapons, anti-aircraft and anti-tank rockets to the Saudis. Mr Aziz says the End-User Certificate conditions will guarantee that these are not used outside Saudi Arabia. This is a load of nonsense. Why the Saudis should suddenly turn to Pakistan for these weapons when traditionally they have tapped the US and Europe has, however, given the game away. These potential game-changing weapons are clearly meant for use by Saudi-backed Wahhabi-Salafist rebels in Syria who are fighting to overthrow the Baathist secular Asad regime.

The Saudis and the Emirates-Gulfdoms are feeling insecure because of the Shia revival in their heartlands. This is because the restless Shias are sitting on their oil reserves. Iran, too, is unremitting in opposing Saudi influence. Worse, the Americans are seeking negotiated nuclear solutions in Iran instead of succumbing to Saudi pressure for military action. And American self-reliance on shale gas is the first definite step against continued dependence on Saudi oil.

On the heels of the Saudi VVIPs now comes the King of Bahrain to Islamabad. The PMLN government claims that foreign investment deals are in the offing. But the small print betrays the real motive behind “renewed manpower exports”. The Bahraini Emir wants well-trained and equipped Pakistani military mercenaries to beef up his police and security forces to repress the rising democratic impulses of the majority Shia populations. It is as simple as that.

It is the same old treacherous story. Since independence in 1947, the Pakistani ruling classes and military establishment have lived off rents from leasing out their “services” to the highest foreign bidder instead of standing on their own feet and not meddling in other peoples business. In the 1950s, 60s and 80s, they sold their services to the Americans, first against the USSR and then against the Taliban; now, in the 2010s, they are rolling up their sleeves to stir the Middle-East cauldron at the behest of a rich “friend”. The extremist Sunni blow back from the first lease to the US in the shape of the Taliban, Al-Qaeda and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi is now primed for escalation and blow back during the proposed second lease to the Saudi-Emirates network. We are making another irrevocable blunder, so help us Allah.

 

LINK

 

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If just Iran decides to step in and starts pumping in guns and money to Shias who want to take it, you'll have Syria II here.

 

Just when you thought Paki establishment has learned something from the past, you get the renewal of the same policies.

Sounds like a wish - not a prediction. Too bad (for you) Pakistan will never let Iran put its dirty hands inside its territory.

Edited by Abu_Muslim

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This is going to turn out very badly.

 

At best you'll have tens of thousands of Paki military coming home all fired up with sectarian aggro. At worst they'll stay in the middle east to be used as cannon fodder for a bigger Sunni/Shia conflict there.

 

Creating Pakistan was one big mistake IMHO.

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Creating Pakistan was one big mistake IMHO.

 

In retrospect, with the history of the last six decades behind us, this seems to be the case.

 

However, the Aligarh boys led by the Gujarati barrister didn't really think that the post-colonial Sunni Islam worldwide will lose it's sanity en masse. Perhaps they were short-sighted or perhaps they were too fed up with Congress' arrogant electoral majoritarianism (an idea imported from the colonial masters), but if we are to name one person who pushed things off the cliff, it has to be no other than Narendra Modi's hero: Sadar Vallabhai Patel. That man was the real creator of Pakistan.

Edited by Marbles

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Narendra might have been the sock puppet on the British hand because such massive undertaking could only have been managed by the British and British alone.

 

Sardar Patel.

 

Anyway, a lot of off topic posts in that other thread and in this one, I think we should stick to discussing contemporary geopolitics than wondering which countries should or should not have been created; this is a matter of academic inquiry and serves no one's purpose in how to combat the menace of jihadist terrorism.

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regimechange Saudi Arabia - problems solved!

 

Why dont the shiites start a United force that can encompass everyone to defend themselves against the next round of the hebrew salafi advance?

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Sardar Patel.

 

Anyway, a lot of off topic posts in that other thread and in this one, I think we should stick to discussing contemporary geopolitics than wondering which countries should or should not have been created; this is a matter of academic inquiry and serves no one's purpose in how to combat the menace of jihadist terrorism.

I agree. Acknowledging the existence of a problem is the first step towards solving that problem. no?

defending it with faulty reasons only provides more reasons for its existence which in turn adds to suffering and misery.

 

If you go in the other thread you'd see that our unstable friend kept on barking at me and getting personal. Had no other choice but to stoop to his level. 

 

And I have no idea why people get all worked up about an abstract entity? That is so motherland or fatherland style of 20th century European patriotism. We are 21st century and the supposed era of individualism with Dr. Google at our service.

Edited by Wahdat

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