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amirhosein_88

Who Is Your Marja' Taqlid?

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Salamun alaykum.

A question from Shi'a only: Who is your Marja' Taqlid (religious authority)?

It is specially useful for those who want to answer to religious questions.

Also I'll appreciate if you tell me that who is the most-followed Marja' Taqlid by Shi'a community in your region (mention your region if you like).

Thanks in advance.

Edited by amirhosein_88

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How do you decide which maraji to emulate?

Does one search for the opinion on who's the most learned in jurisprudence only or are other factors taken into consideration in such a choice? Such as the view on wahdat al wujud etc?

 

Do all maraji publish a book of islamic law?

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How do you decide which maraji to emulate?

Does one search for the opinion on who's the most learned in jurisprudence only or are other factors taken into consideration in such a choice? Such as the view on wahdat al wujud etc?

 

Do all maraji publish a book of islamic law?

 

3. There are three ways of identifying a Mujtahid, and the A'alam:

when a person is certain that a particular person is a Mujtahid, or the most learned one. For this, he should be a learned person himself, and should possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or an A'alam; when two persons, who are learned and just and possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or the A'alam, confirm that a person is a Mujtahid or an A'lam, provided that two other learned and just persons do not contradict them. In fact, being a Mujt ahid or an A'lam can also be established by a statement of only one trusted and reliable person; when a number of learned persons who possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or an A'lam, certify that a particular person is a Mujtahid or an A'lam, provided that one is satisfied by their statement.

4. If one generally knows that the verdicts of Mujtahids do vary in day to day matters, and also that some of the Mujtahids are more capable than the others, but is unable to identify the most learned one, then he should act on precaution based on t heir verdicts. And if he is unable to act on precaution, then he should follow a Mujtahid he supposes to be the most learned. And if decides that they are all of equal stature, then he has a choice.

5. There are four ways of obtaining the verdicts of a Mujtahid:

When a man hears from the Mujtahid himself. When the verdict of the Mujtahid is quoted by two just persons. When a man hears the verdict from a person whose statement satisfies him. By reading the Mujtahid's book of Masae'l, provided that, one is satisfied about the correctness of the book.

 

[http://www.sistani.org/english/book/48/2116/]

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3. There are three ways of identifying a Mujtahid, and the A'alam:

when a person is certain that a particular person is a Mujtahid, or the most learned one. For this, he should be a learned person himself, and should possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or an A'alam; when two persons, who are learned and just and possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or the A'alam, confirm that a person is a Mujtahid or an A'lam, provided that two other learned and just persons do not contradict them. In fact, being a Mujt ahid or an A'lam can also be established by a statement of only one trusted and reliable person; when a number of learned persons who possess the capacity to identify a Mujtahid or an A'lam, certify that a particular person is a Mujtahid or an A'lam, provided that one is satisfied by their statement.

4. If one generally knows that the verdicts of Mujtahids do vary in day to day matters, and also that some of the Mujtahids are more capable than the others, but is unable to identify the most learned one, then he should act on precaution based on t heir verdicts. And if he is unable to act on precaution, then he should follow a Mujtahid he supposes to be the most learned. And if decides that they are all of equal stature, then he has a choice.

5. There are four ways of obtaining the verdicts of a Mujtahid:

When a man hears from the Mujtahid himself. When the verdict of the Mujtahid is quoted by two just persons. When a man hears the verdict from a person whose statement satisfies him. By reading the Mujtahid's book of Masae'l, provided that, one is satisfied about the correctness of the book.

 

[http://www.sistani.org/english/book/48/2116/]

Salaam,

thank you. From my very limited understanding and experience I've understood that Ayatullah Sistani is the most learned based on the recommendation of others who are more knowledgable and the amount of works published in english that are based on his rulings and writings.

 

When the more knowledgable discerns which particular scholar out of several high ranking scholars that is to be considered the most learned - Is it only the specific methodology of deriving the fatwas that is evaluated against the methodology of the other considered scholars (and predecessors)?

Or are they also taking into consideration the particular scholars amount of studies, rank and philosophical stance on for eample Ilm ul-Kalam / theology and irfan / gnosticism?

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Salaam,

thank you. From my very limited understanding and experience I've understood that Ayatullah Sistani is the most learned based on the recommendation of others who are more knowledgable and the amount of works published in english that are based on his rulings and writings.

 

When the more knowledgable discerns which particular scholar out of several high ranking scholars that is to be considered the most learned - Is it only the specific methodology of deriving the fatwas that is evaluated against the methodology of the other considered scholars (and predecessors)?

Or are they also taking into consideration the particular scholars amount of studies, rank and philosophical stance on for eample Ilm ul-Kalam / theology and irfan / gnosticism?

 

Wsalam,

 

I have also understood that Ayatollah Sayyid Seestani is the most learned based on the recommendation of others. As to your question I am unaware of what the conditions are of discerning who is the most knowledgeable inshAllah someone who knows will answer :).

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Salaam,

thank you. From my very limited understanding and experience I've understood that Ayatullah Sistani is the most learned based on the recommendation of others who are more knowledgable and the amount of works published in english that are based on his rulings and writings.

 

When the more knowledgable discerns which particular scholar out of several high ranking scholars that is to be considered the most learned - Is it only the specific methodology of deriving the fatwas that is evaluated against the methodology of the other considered scholars (and predecessors)?

Or are they also taking into consideration the particular scholars amount of studies, rank and philosophical stance on for eample Ilm ul-Kalam / theology and irfan / gnosticism?

 

Bismillah

 

Wasalam `alaykum,

 

You can't go wrong with Sayyid Sistani, he's the default marja'. When in doubt, follow Sistani, is what I say (though my research lead me to believe there are other equally or even possibly more knowledgeable than him, but I stand by the opinion that it is almost impossible to measure or tell practically).

 

I've read/heard two answers to your question.

 

One belief is that the scholar should be the strongest in Fiqh (Jurisprudence)and Usul (principles of jurisprudence) --those being the only requirements-- and most able in extrapolating Islamic law from it's sources. Those who hold this view obviously deem it enough to only be specialised in the fields of Fiqh and usul and have the knowledge of those studies as personal disposition (other studies required in the process of extrapolation can be referred to as references - like syntax).

 

The other view, although it seems the same but as you will see the focus is different, is that the person should be most able to extrapolate the ruling of Islam. This view comes without the sole conditions of Fiqh and Usul, and the emphasis here is the extrapolation and deduction of ISLAMIC law. The focus is on Islamic, meaning he/she who is most able to understand what Islam says (some scholars add this as a further description/explanation). For this, it is argued that Fiqh and Usul are not sufficient and the scholar should also be well-versed in other important deciding factors like Kalaam (theology), history, detailed hadith studies etc.

 

Then there is the less common view that the person should also be brave, aware of his times and surroundings and some other things which skip my mind. If I'm not mistaken this was the view of Sayed al-Khomanie (ra).

 

Please don't take my word for it and look further into the subject, this was merely food for thought from my understandings of what I've read and come across.

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Distinction between knowledge and leadership

Distinction between knowledge and politics

This is what sunnis believe

This is what their caliphs started

 

Since you did not quote any specific post I did not actually get what your post supposed to mean.

Do you  mean that the jurisprudencial marja  should be the same person who is known as political leader of Islamic community? 

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Salamun alaykum

 

My marja is Ayatullah Khamenei

 

I want to emphasize that different marāje don’t equal different ideas and opinions in main jurisprudential rules and doctrines. What makes them different is small detailed edicts.

 

One the other hand, different marāje do not contradict each other. i.e. you cannot claim that whoever follow other marja is wrong while no one can acclaim who is most learned and so the two marjas are at the same level of knowledge.

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Since you did not quote any specific post I did not actually get what your post supposed to mean.

Do you  mean that the jurisprudencial marja  should be the same person who is known as political leader of Islamic community? 

 

well, I'm not a mujtahid, I was just replying to this:

 

Then there is the less common view that the person should also be brave, aware of his times and surroundings and some other things which skip my mind. If I'm not mistaken this was the view of Sayed al-Khomanie (ra).

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well, I'm not a mujtahid, I was just replying to this:

 

Bismillah

 

Are you disagreeing with the fact that i wrote (that this is a less common idea amongst the Shiite jurists) or trying to argue the notion that those should also be conditions?

 

I'm assuming it's the second. I didn't make a judgement between any of the definitions, i merely stated them. So i'm not sure why your post is addressed to me, or in reply to my post. 

 

Also, 'skip(/ped) my mind' is an english expression which means 'i forget' or 'i don't recall/remember'. I don't understand your reasoning for highlighting it?

Edited by Al-Englisi

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Salaam

No need to get sensitive

I was addressing those who made this criterion a "less common idea" and a "forgotten fact"

I hope my mistake "skips your mind" as well!

Edited by mesbah

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Salaam

No need to get sensitive

I was addressing those who made this criterion a "less common idea" and a "forgotten fact"

I hope my mistake "skips your mind" as well!

 

Bismillah

 

You quoted my post, so it would seem to any reader that you were responding to me, i'm just clarifying that i did not give a personal opinion about which definition is more correct (obviously because i don't have the right to). 

 

That's not how we use the phrase 'skip your (/my) mind'. Its used for the past-tense. 

 

Also, who said there is a problem in separating knowledge and leadership? Not all knowledgeable scholars are good leaders and not all good leaders are necessarily  knowledgable scholars. The ideal in a leader would be that he is also the most knowledgable, but it can be debated that the ideal for the person giving us rulings regarding our day-to-day rulings regarding `ibadaat is not that he also has to be a leader. 

 

You should look into the views of Sheikh Hadawi Tehrani's regarding the separation of marj`aiyyah and wilayah. He discusses this issue there. 

 

Many of our great scholars did believe in the separation of the things you mentioned, unless you can refute their arguments i would suggest you refrain from emotional comments

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Salaam

(I thought replying salaam was wajib)

I wish my mistake skipped your mind!

(Not to mention, originally it's: "slip one's mind", let's just forget it, me englis iz pour, lol)

I said earlier: I'm not a mujtahid

I said something out of my own opinion, it's not this much serious. As you said, it might be even a little emotional.

Thanks for your advice, I'll try not to have emotional comments.

Edited by mesbah

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