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In the Name of God بسم الله

Were Rumi, Hafez, Ferdowsi... Shia?

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SA,

 

Were Rumi and other famous poets Shia or Sunni?

At the time their was Sunni rule and they were possibly Sunni by force.

But many Shia Shaykhs believe they practiced taqqiya and were Shia.

Allama Tabatabai believes Rumi was Shia.

Any proof for these?

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Molavi has a poem about 12 shia Imams which is in his Diwan-e Shams. It is believed that he was a Sufi.

 

As to Hafez, little is known about his life. He has poems about Imam Ali, Imam Hussain and Imam Mahdi (a) but no poems about Sunni Caliphs.

 

As to Ferdosi, people say different things. It is said that he was a shia who did taqia because Qaznavi kings were cruel to shias.

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SA,

 

Were Rumi and other famous poets Shia or Sunni?

At the time their was Sunni rule and they were possibly Sunni by force.

But many Shia Shaykhs believe they practiced taqqiya and were Shia.

Allama Tabatabai believes Rumi was Shia.

Any proof for these?

 

There is an an opinion that Firdawsi was a Shia but it is disputed. None others were Shia. They were all Sunni Sufis.

 

I have not come across Allamah Tabatabai saying Rumi was a Shia.

 

Sunni Sufis back then held twelve imams in great esteem and that's probably the reason for this confusion.

 

There was a sub-sect that was called`Ithna Ashari Sunnis because of their love for Twelve Imams but their adherence to the Sunni creed. I don't have a reference to this at hand but maybe someone will be able to expand on it.

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Hafez couldn't be a sufi because he criticized Sufis in his poems.

 

As to Molavi, he said in his poem that "my second Imam is ...., the third one is ....", so we can not undoubtedly say that he was a sunni.

 

Sufis criticised each other all the time. What we should not forget that there were many sects and shades of Sufism in medieval times. Even some apparently strict jurists famed for their anti-sufi stance themselves practiced some form of Sufism. They were not like Wahhabis of today who completely reject all things Sufi.

Edited by Marbles
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(salam)

 

In regards to Hafez, for those who know Farsi can read this link: حافظ شیرازی شیعه بود یا سنی؟ (Was Hafez Shirazi a Shia or a Sunni)

 

I have translated a few sentences from it: 

 

Ayatullah al-Udhma Syed Musawi Shuberi Zanjani in one of his footnotes in the book "A Sip From the Sea" that has been recently published, writes the following in regards to the religion of Hafez Shirazi:


One of the proofs of Hafez Shirazi being a Sunni is his praise of judge Faali. Hafez says that the strength of the Sharia' is with a few people and one of them is Majd al-Deen Ismael Faali. Besides the fact that during the time of Hafez, Shiraz was a center for Sunnis, Hafez being a Shi'a is like a person being a Sunni in Qom, which is something far-fetched and unusual. Some people understand the poetry from Hafez's Divan as a proof for his Tashayyu, when in reality these stanzas are not present in the older manuscripts and have been added due to revisions.

 

It carries on with statements made by Muhammad Qazwini regarding one of the verses of his poetry and that it didn't exist in the older manuscripts.

 

It also quotes Bahauddin Khoramshahi, who says about the religion of Hafez:

 

In his dogma, meaning the theological school, Hafez was a follower of the Ash'ari school of thought and in his jurisprudence he was a Shaf'aee.

 

(Source)

Edited by Ibn al-Hussain
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Pretty sure Rumi and Hafeze were likely just Sunnis as they appeared and not Shia in taqiyya, but the Sunni Sufis of the medieval period held some beliefs that would otherwise be categorized as Shi'ite today, such as a belief in the 12 Imams as spiritual leaders although they were Sunni in fiqh and creed. One contemporary example in the Naqshbandi tariqat, which is a devout Sunni order but believes that the 12th Imam is the Mahdi.

On 2/3/2014 at 5:09 AM, Marbles said:

Sufis criticised each other all the time. What we should not forget that there were many sects and shades of Sufism in medieval times. Even some apparently strict jurists famed for their anti-sufi stance themselves practiced some form of Sufism. They were not like Wahhabis of today who completely reject all things Sufi.

Absolutely, the Wahabis love Ibn Taymiyya cause he's critical of Sufis and Shi'ites alike, but often forget or don't realize that he was an initiate of Sufism himself (Qadiriya tariqat I believe).

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On 2/3/2014 at 1:42 PM, Marbles said:

^ Whose portrait is this?

Shah Ismail Safavi I also known by his pen-name "Khatai" or "The Sinner." Shah Ismail made Ithna Ashari Shi'ism the state religion of Iran and is pretty much responsible by his actions for Iran being a majority Shi'ite country today. He was also head of the Safavid Sufi Tariqat and a prolific writer of mystical poetry. It's a shame much of his work still remains untranslated.

"Today I have to come to the world as a master, know truly that I am Haydar’s son. I am Faridun, Khusraw, Jamshid and Zohak. I am Zal’s son and Alexander. The mystery of Anal-Haqq (‘I am the Truth’) is hidden in this my heart. I am the Absolute Truth and what I say is Truth. I belong to the religion of the Adherent of the Vali (Ali) and on the Shah’s path I am a guide to everyone who says ‘I am a Muslim.’ My sign is the ‘Crown of Happiness.’ I am the signet ring on Sulayman’s finger. Muhammad is made of Light. Ali of Mystery. I am a pearl in the sea of Absolute Reality. I am Khatai, the Shah’s slave full of shortcomings. At thy gate I am the smallest and l am the smallest and the last"

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On 2/3/2014 at 2:03 PM, Marbles said:

Don't forget Ayatullah Khomeini's own Sufi/irfani poetry.

“Oh, I desire a cup of wine from the Beloved's own hands. In whom can I confide this secret? Where am I to take my grief? I have yearned a lifetime to see the Beloved's face; I am a frenzied moth circling a flame, A wild rue seed pod roasting in the fire. See my stained cloak and this prayer-rug of hypocrisy; Can I , one day, tear them to shreds at the tavern door?”  –Ayatollah Khomeini

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We cannot say confidently that they were sunni, shia or sufi. There are also reasons for believing- or strictly speaking, for guessing- that these historical figures were shia. For example, in his poem about Imam Hossein(a), Hafez implies that Imam has "Wilayah" or that Imam Mahdi is in "gheibah" (unlike what sunnis believe). Attar-e Neishaburi also happened to be a shia in his last writings.

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