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In the Name of God بسم الله
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Sapphire

Self Cpr!

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(salam)

I received this email today and I wanted to share it with all of you.

What are you to do if you have a heart attack while you are alone. Let's say it's 6:15 p.m. And you're driving home (alone of course), after an usually hard day on the job. You're really tired, upset and frustrated. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to radiate out Into your arm and up into your jaw. You are only about five miles from the hospital nearest your home. Unfortunately you don't know if you'll be able to make it that far. What can you do? You've been trained in CPR but the guy that taught the course didn't tell you what to do if it happened to yourself.

Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack, this article seemed to be in order. Without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness. However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously. A deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest. A breath and a cough must be repeated about every two seconds without let up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital.

Source: From Health Cares, Rochester General Hospital via Chapter 240s newsletter 'AND THE BEAT GOES ON '

OHHHH!!! I did not capitalize CPR. I am such a loser. :(

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Not sure if you can even capitalize all alphabets in the title. SC doesn't allow this, methinks. It automatically makes them small case other than the first alphabet if you write all in capitals.

Not my fault then. I am not a loser.

OHHHHH!!!!! *Facepalm* :mellow:

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Basically, a heart attack (medically known as a myocardial infarction), is where the blood supply to the coronary arteries supplying the heart muscle is suddenly blocked. There are only 2 things that can treat this: blood thinners, or an angiogram to physically clear the blockage with a stent

This 'article' is probably discussing an arrhythmia, which is not a heart attack at all but an abnormal heart rhythm, usually felt by a person as palpitations, particularly very fast heart rhythms where the heart pumps so fast the blood pressure drops to zero and a person faints due to lack of blood supply to the brain. this can sometimes be reversed with physical manoeuvres, such as valsalval manoeuvre (where a person holds their breath and strains), or by massaging the left side of the neck. this sometimes reverses the abnormal rhythm, but lots of times they don't and you need specific rhythm control medications

Edited by mohammad_mahdi

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CPR does not help heart attacks, only cardiac arrest. And if you have cardiac arrest, you're already unconscious.

I'm CPR certified by the Red Cross.

You should clarify, for the benefit of those who don't know, that heart attacks are a leading cause of cardiac arrest; therefore, the two are not mutually exclusive. CPR is useful in any situation where normal breathing has been affected - to ensure at least a partial supply of oxygen to the brain and heart and delay tissue death.

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You should clarify, for the benefit of those who don't know, that heart attacks are a leading cause of cardiac arrest; therefore, the two are not mutually exclusive. CPR is useful in any situation where normal breathing has been affected - to ensure at least a partial supply of oxygen to the brain and heart and delay tissue death.

CPR is cardiopulmonary resuscitation. If somebody's heart is not stopped (heart attack the heart still works) but is only having trouble breathing, you only need to give the "rescue breaths". There is no use (in fact it can be harmful) in performing chest compressions when somebody is not in a state of cardiac arrest. That is why the first step of CPR is always to check for a pulse and breathing. CPR is only useful if their heart isn't beating & they aren't breathing.

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Unfortunately, knowing that CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not in and of itself a qualification to perform CPR. It's quite clear that it's been a while since you were certified, or that you should not have been able to obtain your CPR certification.

 

First, heart attacks are a leading cause of cardiac arrest. Primary cardiac arrest, i.e. a person suddenly dropping to the floor, losing consciousness and breathing, is not as frequent as you'd think. In most cases, lay public cannot tell the difference between the onset of a heart attack to the point where cardiac arrest has occurred - this includes lay public who are CPR/first aid certified. A number of studies indicate that rescuers are unable to reliably determine whether an unresponsive individual has a pulse or is breathing. Therefore, this evidence and subsequent improvements in best practices recommend that rescuers should err on the side of caution and perform CPR in a situation where the person is unresponsive.

 

Second, chest compressions are not harmful if somebody isn't in a state of cardiac arrest. This is something on which there's almost a unanimous agreement. Even if you were to perform chest compressions on an individual who has normal breathing, it is very unlikely to cause any damage. Broken chest bones etc can all be fixed, dead cardiac tissue cannot. So the myth that CPR can be harmful has been thoroughly discredited by a number of studies - I'm unaware of any reputable CPR/First Aid training organizations that continue to peddle this stuff. If anything, chest compressions are THE most important aspect of CPR. You can even do without rescue breaths (because if the person is someone you don't know, you've no idea what kind of diseases they might be carrying, so many rescuers will forgo rescue breaths in order to safeguard their own health).

 

A simple Google search reveals the following in up-to-date CPR practices:
 

 

It is not dangerous to perform chest compressions even if the heart is still beating. You cannot make a patient any worse than he or she already is. Yes, you may break ribs, but the alternative is almost certainly death. The patient’s medical history is not important; conditions such as a pacemaker or bypass surgery should not concern you as a bystander.

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/116/25/e566.full

 

http://heart.arizona.edu/frequently-asked-questions

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