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In the Name of God بسم الله

What Have You Watched Recently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]

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Chaotic Muslem

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Care to share more than the poster brother?

 

 

8.9/10- IMDb
 
In short, Henry Fonda's masterpiece!

imgThe+Counterfeiters3.jpg

 

 

7.6/10-IMDb
 
 
A 2007 Austrian-German drama film, a secret plan by Nazi Germany during the Second World War to destabilize the United Kingdom by flooding its economy with forged Bank of England pound notes by the help of Jewish prisoners.
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The Hunt. Fantastic Danish film about a nursery school teacher wrongfully accused of rape. A very, very good film. Extremely well written and directed. I highly recommend that you all watch it!

 

What recourse do you have when an angelic child, just to spite her teacher, describes things that can only be interpreted as sexual abuse? None whatsoever; it is as though the accusation proves the guilt.

 

It’s an excellent critique of  preconceived notions and our attitudes towards some social matters, which, though serious, are guided by irrationality and impulse than by reason and evidence.

 

http://gulgasht.wordpress.com/2014/10/10/movie-the-hunt-2012/

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If anyone has seen Interstellar, let me know. I am trying to decide if it's worth finding and paying a babysitter to see it in IMAX, wait for the DVD, or skip it entirely.

I've heard that it's beautiful but the plot is not great. The question is how beautiful? We do have a nice TV. Is it pretty enough to pay $30-50 for babysitter + IMAX tickets, or only $1 from the Redbox rental on our TV?

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If anyone has seen Interstellar, let me know. I am trying to decide if it's worth finding and paying a babysitter to see it in IMAX, wait for the DVD, or skip it entirely.

I've heard that it's beautiful but the plot is not great. The question is how beautiful? We do have a nice TV. Is it pretty enough to pay $30-50 for babysitter + IMAX tickets, or only $1 from the Redbox rental on our TV?

 

Mixed reviews at best. It's being crticised as boring and too long.

 

But for a film of this nature, regular telly cannot replicate the imax experience. Think of Gravity. A pretty stale film but its vistas and crashing-plane action won't make you throw up from sheer experience if you watch it on regular telly than in an imax setting.

 

If you want to enjoy the experience go for imax; if you just want to watch the film then rely on your telly.

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god1.jpg

 

The Godfather 1 (1972)

 

Everything about this film is brilliant. Watched it in my teens, did not appreciate it enough, prolly because at that time I did not understand much English. Re-watched it after all these years and man, full marks. To Al Pacino.

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The Tale of Princess Kaguya by Isao Takahata.

 

The-Tale-of-Princess-Kaguya-poster.jpg

 

 

 

Japanese poster is cooler as usual.

 

This is Takahata's first movie in a million years.

 

It is based on a Japanese folk tale where a bamboo cutter finds a tiny girl inside a bamboo stalk and determines that she is a gift from Heaven and that he and his wife must raise this girl to be a princess.

 

Before I go any further, I have to give a haraam content warning (in order of severity):

 

1) There is a lot of baby nudity in this movie (which isn't really haraam content but it may be off-putting to some)

 

2) Child (pre-pubescent) titular character is shown taking off her clothes to jump into a watering hole (can't really be defined as sexual content but very off-putting for us as mozlems; the Japanese on the other hand don't seem to have a problem with child nudity)

 

3) Old lady is shown breast-feeding the infant titular character. She is completely exposed in this scene. I think it lasted from anywhere from 30 to 60 seconds. Not sure how much of it involved actual exposure, as I was piously looking away. But this scene completely threw me off guard; I never thought such a thing would be shown in a Ghibli movie. It is very unfortunate that if I were to ever have children, I could not show them this movie because of this scene.

 

 

Aside from these warnings (#3 is the only serious one, the rest were just precautionary), what is the substance of the movie?

 

The bamboo cutter raises the girl. She grows in spurts, which causes the other kids in the village to call her "Bamboo stalk." Meanwhile, the mysterious bamboo stalk in which the girl was found, starts giving gold and clothing to the bamboo cutter. This, he is convinced, is a sign from Heaven that he must move to the capital and give the girl the upbringing of a noblewoman. The girl hates the nobility lifestyle. A bunch of suitors come after her after hearing rumors of her unprecedented beauty; including, eventually, the king himself. This causes her to further hate her life and to subconsciously pray to the moon for her salvation. The moon answers her prayers and it is revealed to her that she is actually from the moon. She had come to earth to experience life as it was meant to be experienced, but after she sought to be saved from the circumstance of being pressured by the king into marriage, some kind of moon-Buddha comes down to take her back to the moon.

 

This is a very Japanese movie.

 

Takahata has the distinction of making another very Japanese movie, Pom Poko. I loved Pom Poko, but it was far from my favorite work of his (due to its intense light-heartedness and lack of seriousness). I think Pom Poko can only be appreciated if you love Japanese culture, whereas Kaguya can be appreciated by all. It has some vintage Takahata touches; the close-ups on very small but very beautiful experiences/feelings, the purposeful cuteness, and the perfect balance of desperation with hope. And the animation style is really cool, too. It's not breathtaking like Howl's Moving Castle or Princess Mononoke but it has a beautiful simplicity to it. And in some sequences it becomes much more muddled and obscure (for artistic effect).

 

Now the question is: what is this folk tale all about? What lesson does it teach? I have no idea. I think it has something to do with contentment; Kaguya cannot find contentment in her life as a noblewoman and keeps reminiscing about the village. This causes her to hate her life and want to flee from it. And yet, as soon as she realizes that she will be taken away from earth, she becomes devastated.

 

But whether or not my wannabe assessment is right, makes no difference. This movie is less a narrative than an experience. Each moment stands on its own; it does not need to form a cohesive whole (although it does, in its own Japanese way).

 

Highly recommended but watch out for the breast-feeding scene. It's maybe 4-5 minutes into the movie.

 

I give it 9/10. Would have been 10/10 if not for aforementioned scene.

Edited by baradar_jackson
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twilight.jpg

 

The Twilight Samurai (2002)

 

So this is the story of an impoverished Samurai at the time when the art of fighting is dying and new systems are taking over, changing the old face of society.

 

I was looking for some nice action like in The Blind Swordsman: Zatoichi but it turned out to be a social drama and a very slow one at that.

 

I watched it in three installments as I was bored to death and also because I couldn't get hold of decent subs so it was hard to follow the subpar English translation.

 

However, last half hour has some redeeming qualities. Over all not something I'd recommend, though it got high ratings on IMDb etc

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0351817/

 

 

 

 

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Yesterday I messaged by wife to ask when are we going to see Interstellar, it ain't gonna watch itself.....2 seconds after she replies with a pic of two tickets in her hand :D :wub:

 

Anyway, I fount it to be pretty awesome. It wasn't in 3d but I would still recommend watching it at IMAX because of the amazing sights. The audio and video quality beats any other theatre any day. I'm not a huge critic of movies so I thoroughly enjoyed it. Some might find some parts to be slow but I like details in a movie. I hate paying money to see short movies. So at 2hrs 50mins, I got my money's worth. (well my wife's)

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I watched a man (don't know who he is) make fun of Erdogan mainly because of his new treason to the Turkish nation, that is,  "Ak Saray" (The White Palace) which is "The White House" (Cancer) of the Middle East.

 

And the video is not surprising to me because when the subserviants (Ankara) try to become like their masters (Washington), it is natural that they are made fun of by the masters. Enjoy it:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhwRO-TXCF4

 

P.s. The speaker says the truth though with improper ways (bad language) sometimes. But one thing, and the main problem is that, he finds this suprising. Because in the beginning he admits that Turkish regime is one of the most important allies of the USA regime and after that he says "BUT he is controversial in his country" as if it is unnatural for "controversial" rulers (i.e. tyrants) to be allies of the USA regime. He should have said "AND" instead of "BUT".

Edited by HamzaTR
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600full-pulp-fiction-poster.jpg

 

Pulp Fiction (1994)

 

A fine piece of filmmaking. Tarantino turns pulp fiction into an art form. Fantastic humour.

Warnings: strong language, an objectionable scene of intimacy but no nudity as such. It is 18+ for its violence.


Uma Thurman :wub:

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thanks for the review, I can't find this anywhere on line... 

 

 

The Tale of Princess Kaguya by Isao Takahata.

 

The-Tale-of-Princess-Kaguya-poster.jpg

 

 

 

Japanese poster is cooler as usual.

 

This is Takahata's first movie in a million years.

 

It is based on a Japanese folk tale where a bamboo cutter finds a tiny girl inside a bamboo stalk and determines that she is a gift from Heaven and that he and his wife must raise this girl to be a princess.

 

Before I go any further, I have to give a haraam content warning (in order of severity):

 

1) There is a lot of baby nudity in this movie (which isn't really haraam content but it may be off-putting to some)

 

2) Child (pre-pubescent) titular character is shown taking off her clothes to jump into a watering hole (can't really be defined as sexual content but very off-putting for us as mozlems; the Japanese on the other hand don't seem to have a problem with child nudity)

 

3) Old lady is shown breast-feeding the infant titular character. She is completely exposed in this scene. I think it lasted from anywhere from 30 to 60 seconds. Not sure how much of it involved actual exposure, as I was piously looking away. But this scene completely threw me off guard; I never thought such a thing would be shown in a Ghibli movie. It is very unfortunate that if I were to ever have children, I could not show them this movie because of this scene.

 

 

Aside from these warnings (#3 is the only serious one, the rest were just precautionary), what is the substance of the movie?

 

The bamboo cutter raises the girl. She grows in spurts, which causes the other kids in the village to call her "Bamboo stalk." Meanwhile, the mysterious bamboo stalk in which the girl was found, starts giving gold and clothing to the bamboo cutter. This, he is convinced, is a sign from Heaven that he must move to the capital and give the girl the upbringing of a noblewoman. The girl hates the nobility lifestyle. A bunch of suitors come after her after hearing rumors of her unprecedented beauty; including, eventually, the king himself. This causes her to further hate her life and to subconsciously pray to the moon for her salvation. The moon answers her prayers and it is revealed to her that she is actually from the moon. She had come to earth to experience life as it was meant to be experienced, but after she sought to be saved from the circumstance of being pressured by the king into marriage, some kind of moon-Buddha comes down to take her back to the moon.

 

This is a very Japanese movie.

 

Takahata has the distinction of making another very Japanese movie, Pom Poko. I loved Pom Poko, but it was far from my favorite work of his (due to its intense light-heartedness and lack of seriousness). I think Pom Poko can only be appreciated if you love Japanese culture, whereas Kaguya can be appreciated by all. It has some vintage Takahata touches; the close-ups on very small but very beautiful experiences/feelings, the purposeful cuteness, and the perfect balance of desperation with hope. And the animation style is really cool, too. It's not breathtaking like Howl's Moving Castle or Princess Mononoke but it has a beautiful simplicity to it. And in some sequences it becomes much more muddled and obscure (for artistic effect).

 

Now the question is: what is this folk tale all about? What lesson does it teach? I have no idea. I think it has something to do with contentment; Kaguya cannot find contentment in her life as a noblewoman and keeps reminiscing about the village. This causes her to hate her life and want to flee from it. And yet, as soon as she realizes that she will be taken away from earth, she becomes devastated.

 

But whether or not my wannabe assessment is right, makes no difference. This movie is less a narrative than an experience. Each moment stands on its own; it does not need to form a cohesive whole (although it does, in its own Japanese way).

 

Highly recommended but watch out for the breast-feeding scene. It's maybe 4-5 minutes into the movie.

 

I give it 9/10. Would have been 10/10 if not for aforementioned scene.

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I watched "5 broken cameras"...like a film, but reality..very sad and touching.At the same time so inspiring how people never loose hope and humor.

There are five cameras — each with its own story. (from wiki)

When his fourth son, Gibreel, is born in 2005, self-taught cameraman Emad Burnat, a Palestinian villager, gets his first camera. At the same time in his village of Bil’in, the Israelis begin bulldozing village olive groves to build a barrier to separate Bil'in from the Jewish Settlement Modi'in Illit. The barrier's route cuts off 60% of Bil'in farmland and the villagers resist this seizure of more of their land by the settlers.During the next year, Burnat films this struggle, which is led by two of his best friends, while at the same time recording the growth of his son. Very soon, these events begin to affect his family and his own life.

Emad films the Army and Police beating and arresting villagers and activists who come to support them. Settlers destroy Palestinian olive trees and attack Burnat when he tries to film them. The Army raids the village in the middle of the night to arrest children. He, his friends, and brothers are arrested or shot; some are killed. Each camera used to document these events is shot or smashed.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kEJx90a0Kr8

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Hello everyone.

 

I have seen inception recently, and it was good and very interesting movie..

 

I think one should really look for it...

 

It tests the flight of your imagination and does that with lightening speed. Good stuff.

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7876_poster_iphone.jpg

I saw this a few nights ago. I don't regret doing so.

HARAAM CONTENT WARNING:

- Lots and lots of swearing. If you don't like hearing F-bombs, do not watch this movie.

- Some violence. Not much in the way of graphic/gory depiction of violence (although some fresh cadavers are shown with blood and all that), but because the theme of the movie is so dark and grimy it will seem more violent than it actually is.

- Fortunately, there is no pornographic or romantic content. However, there are some innuendos at, If I recall correctly, two points in the movie.

Overall, I would say most of you would not have a problem with watching it. But if swear words really bother you, then stay away.

This is one of those rare Hollywood movies that isn't a flaming piece of elephant poop. This is one of those rare Hollywood movies whose message is actually very radical and subversive.

Now... of course, when we mozlems watch this movie, we can't help but project a million of our own views and ideas onto it. And I will bring these up shortly, but we have to acknowledge that some of the messages we take from this movie are probably unintentional.

Spoilers below.

The movie follows Lou, a creepy loner who is looking for a job. He comes across a man whose job is to chase after car accidents, fires, and violent crimes to capture footage for local news channels. Lou becomes intrigued and sells his bike to a pawn shop in exchange for a police scanner and a camcorder. He then begins his attempt to make headway into this new profession. He even "hires" an "employee," a homeless guy named Rick, whom he pays 30 dollars each night.

After some rough times, he eventually does find his place, as he becomes successful enough to replace his c.rappy car with a new Dodge Challenger, and get new equipment as well.

Basically, what he starts to do is not only frame the stories any way he pleases, but he begins actually creating events. He manages to orchestrate crimes and capture them in unprecedented ways.

It may not sound all that great from this description, but trust me, it is. As I was watching it, all I could think was that this was a scathing criticism of media, who pretend to be an establishment for upholding truth but are in fact saboteurs who frame events however it pleases them and even perpetuate tragedies and wars and bloodsheds for their own benefit. (Take, for example, the role of the media in the Syrian conflict; they have been egging on the US government to attack Syria for years).

And it can easily be read in that way.

But I read a review on the internet and another explanation seems equally valid. This is a critique of capitalism.

And it makes total sense. Lou is the ultimate "self-made man." In spite of being a complete sociopath, he is very well-spoken, using good diction in addition to drowning anyone he talks to in a sea of business douche buzz words. He is rewarded for his sick behavior and ultimately never gets his comeuppance. These all point to there being a heavy anti-capitalist (and more specifically, anti-all-the-classic-American-capitalist-tropes) message behind this movie. Lou is being a good capitalist. His destroying of lives and treating everyone as pawns in a chess game simply illustrate his go-getter, pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps attitude.

All I can say is: watch the movie, so we can talk about it on here and exchange ideas. Because this movie will get you talking.

It's technically very well done. A lot of good performances (especially by the lead), great cinematography (I swear it scared the hell out of me every time I saw Lou's creepy eyes peering out of the darkness). The dialogue is very good for the most part. It stays away from a lot of the tropes and pitfalls of most Hollywood movies. The ending is very appropriate. It's all around a great movie. I give it 10/10.

PS The guy who plays Rick is the same guy who plays brother Omar in "Four Lions." I love Four Lions so much that I almost never want to see any of those guys play in any other movie, but he does well here.

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the_babadook_poster.jpg

The Babadook (2014)

Something new in the old way. No cheap scare tactics to make you jump off the seat, no blood and gore to disgust you - only plain old horror with a genuinely warmhearted story of a mother and a fatherless child. Despite high marks on IMDb and Rotten Tomatoes, this film, for me, is fifty-fifty, for there are a few silly scenes and unresolved plot components which could have been dealt with better.

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On 11/18/2014 at 1:47 AM, baradar_jackson said:

7876_poster_iphone.jpg

I saw this a few nights ago. I don't regret doing so.

HARAAM CONTENT WARNING:

- Lots and lots of swearing. If you don't like hearing F-bombs, do not watch this movie.

- Some violence. Not much in the way of graphic/gory depiction of violence (although some fresh cadavers are shown with blood and all that), but because the theme of the movie is so dark and grimy it will seem more violent than it actually is.

- Fortunately, there is no pornographic or romantic content. However, there are some innuendos at, If I recall correctly, two points in the movie.

Overall, I would say most of you would not have a problem with watching it. But if swear words really bother you, then stay away.

This is one of those rare Hollywood movies that isn't a flaming piece of elephant poop. This is one of those rare Hollywood movies whose message is actually very radical and subversive.

Now... of course, when we mozlems watch this movie, we can't help but project a million of our own views and ideas onto it. And I will bring these up shortly, but we have to acknowledge that some of the messages we take from this movie are probably unintentional.

Spoilers below.

The movie follows Lou, a creepy loner who is looking for a job. He comes across a man whose job is to chase after car accidents, fires, and violent crimes to capture footage for local news channels. Lou becomes intrigued and sells his bike to a pawn shop in exchange for a police scanner and a camcorder. He then begins his attempt to make headway into this new profession. He even "hires" an "employee," a homeless guy named Rick, whom he pays 30 dollars each night.

After some rough times, he eventually does find his place, as he becomes successful enough to replace his c.rappy car with a new Dodge Challenger, and get new equipment as well.

Basically, what he starts to do is not only frame the stories any way he pleases, but he begins actually creating events. He manages to orchestrate crimes and capture them in unprecedented ways.

It may not sound all that great from this description, but trust me, it is. As I was watching it, all I could think was that this was a scathing criticism of media, who pretend to be an establishment for upholding truth but are in fact saboteurs who frame events however it pleases them and even perpetuate tragedies and wars and bloodsheds for their own benefit. (Take, for example, the role of the media in the Syrian conflict; they have been egging on the US government to attack Syria for years).

And it can easily be read in that way.

But I read a review on the internet and another explanation seems equally valid. This is a critique of capitalism.

And it makes total sense. Lou is the ultimate "self-made man." In spite of being a complete sociopath, he is very well-spoken, using good diction in addition to drowning anyone he talks to in a sea of business douche buzz words. He is rewarded for his sick behavior and ultimately never gets his comeuppance. These all point to there being a heavy anti-capitalist (and more specifically, anti-all-the-classic-American-capitalist-tropes) message behind this movie. Lou is being a good capitalist. His destroying of lives and treating everyone as pawns in a chess game simply illustrate his go-getter, pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps attitude.

All I can say is: watch the movie, so we can talk about it on here and exchange ideas. Because this movie will get you talking.

It's technically very well done. A lot of good performances (especially by the lead), great cinematography (I swear it scared the hell out of me every time I saw Lou's creepy eyes peering out of the darkness). The dialogue is very good for the most part. It stays away from a lot of the tropes and pitfalls of most Hollywood movies. The ending is very appropriate. It's all around a great movie. I give it 10/10.

PS The guy who plays Rick is the same guy who plays brother Omar in "Four Lions." I love Four Lions so much that I almost never want to see any of those guys play in any other movie, but he does well here.

Oh I watched that movie too!! I really liked it :) and yes that main guy is a very good actor for that role, very creepy. 

u all should watch it, it kept me in constant anguish lol, I love those movies that maintain me with that feeling for the whole movie pretty much. 

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algiers.jpg

 

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

 

Well known film, dramatises the struggle of the FLN (Front de Libération Nationale) against French Colonists in Algeria. I'd have liked it to have some focus on the moral right of the natives to challenge the ethic of occupation but the emphasis is heavily on the drama and tactics employed by both sides to win the pitched battle over the years. The original FLN was almost decimated before mass unrest broke out after relative calm, and forced the colonists to flee.

 

A classic and very important film for its time and topic.

Edited by Marbles
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