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In the Name of God بسم الله

What Have You Watched Recently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]

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Chaotic Muslem

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I watched this last night:

 

 

 

Now, this isn't the sort of film that I'd usually watch, but I really felt like watching an action film. In addition to that, I thought this would be absolutely rubbish - I hate gritty, futuristic action flms - but because it had a good IMDB rating, I thought I'd give it a go.

 

It was actually pretty good, I really enjoyed watching it. It is pretty much nothing but an hour and a half of shooting and gore, but it's a good hour and a half of shooting and gore. If you like action films, I'd definitely recommend it. Plus the 'Judges' are extremely badass.

 

So is this a remake of Judge Dredd? Or they just made the old movie 3D?

I was kidding bro. And I see you pick action and war movies.. Not to write reviews but here's two really "bad" movies you might "hate" :D

 

Roozhaye Zendegi 

 

http://www.iranianmovies.org/index.php?topic=335.0 english subs

 

and this one I am planning to watch also..

 

Fareshteghane Qasaab

 

butcher_angels-hady-chattat-soheilsalimi

 

info and download link here

 

http://www.zohur12.ir/دانلود-فرشتگان-قصاب/

 

Enjoy them

 

Thanks.

 

The download link of the first one has not been working for me so far.

 

I downloaded the second one and am 17 mins in (I like to watch movies in stages lol). I will write a long annoying review once I am done.

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I watched this last night:

 

1008122_nl_dredd_1347870485354.jpg

 

Now, this isn't the sort of film that I'd usually watch, but I really felt like watching an action film. In addition to that, I thought this would be absolutely rubbish - I hate gritty, futuristic action flms - but because it had a good IMDB rating, I thought I'd give it a go.

 

It was actually pretty good, I really enjoyed watching it. It is pretty much nothing but an hour and a half of shooting and gore, but it's a good hour and a half of shooting and gore. If you like action films, I'd definitely recommend it. Plus the 'Judges' are extremely badass.

 

I watched this last night:

 

1008122_nl_dredd_1347870485354.jpg

 

Now, this isn't the sort of film that I'd usually watch, but I really felt like watching an action film. In addition to that, I thought this would be absolutely rubbish - I hate gritty, futuristic action flms - but because it had a good IMDB rating, I thought I'd give it a go.

 

It was actually pretty good, I really enjoyed watching it. It is pretty much nothing but an hour and a half of shooting and gore, but it's a good hour and a half of shooting and gore. If you like action films, I'd definitely recommend it. Plus the 'Judges' are extremely badass.

 

I liked this too. I thought I wouldn't but it does what it says on the tin pretty well.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Guys I'm fuming.

 

I've been fuming for the last few days.

 

As most of you know, I'm a DPRK admirer. But I am always hesitant to watch Western documentaries on DPRK. Most of them rehash the same tired perceptions, ideas, and slogans. They don't really inform you (much in the same way that most of the English books available about Iran just rehash the same tired sentences). But I noticed that the comments for DPRK: The Land of Whispers, on youtube, were favorable. People were praising it for being more candid and honest than others. And a friend of mine recommended it, so I decided to give it a go.

 

Dear... God...

 

What a mistake that was.

 

It got off to a bad start, revealing that the narrator for the film would be Professor Euro-douche. I did not like Euro douche from the start, but later I would learn that he was more than just a typical, harmless garden douche but a dangerous brand of venomous douche.

 

Most of the documentary is typical. Repeats the same things, although I do give it credit for admitting that the most recent exchange of fire between the two Koreas was, in fact, provoked by south Korea. But what REALLY turned me off was the last ten minutes or so. Starting at about 47:40, the narrator descends into an abyss of douchey, preachy, pseudo-moralistic rabble rousing. I mean it is REALLY insufferable, to the point that I am still bothered by it DAYS later. (My being so bothered by it prompted me to outlet my rage here).

 

Although I do recommend yall see the last segment of the video, for experience's sake, here is a summary in case you don't feel like it (which I don't blame you if you don't):

 

- He explains the concept of youtube to the tour guides... This is a theme of the movie. He is REALLY convinced that North Koreans' lives are deficient because of the lack of youtubes and iphones and such. (47:50)

- THE MUSIC THEY ARE PLAYING AT THIS SCENE MAKES ME WANT TO GOUGE MY EYES OUT. I feel like this should be played on the trailer of a stupid British romantic comedy, not a documentary about one of the proudest and bravest nations in the world!

- South Korea makes MP3 players, therefore it is better than North Korea. Also, North Koreans are ignorant and becoming aware of this MP3 superiority will cause them to become disillusioned. It didn't take him too long to get back to this theme of his. (48:40)

- Euro douche's mp3 player proceeds to offend the senses of the poor Korean victim who is using it, by playing c.rap such as: The Beatles, John Lennon (king of the smug self-righteous douchebag hypocrites), Rammstein, etc... (48:55)

- Euro douche realizes that poor, unfortunate North Koreans are living a life of ignorance; having no knowledge of the Beatles, electronic music, Gangnam Style, the Dalai Lama, or Shakespeare. (49:25) *BARADAR NOTE* Although I am not certain of any of this (meaning I am not sure if it is true that North Koreans do not know of them), not knowing of most of those things is a blessing. The music acts mentioned are nonsense, and the Dalai Lama is a shameless imperialist puppet. However, I have heard at least ONE North Korean mention Shakespeare, so I would have to question the reliability of Euro-douche's statements.

- North Koreans don't know what "modern cities like Dubai" look like. (49:45). The narrator is apparently unaware of the irony of his statement, being the ONE person in the world who doesn't know that Dubai was built on South Asian slave labor and its very existence is a stain on the face of mankind.

- HAHAHAHA! Stupid North Koreans; they are ignorant of our superior alien technologies. They have so much fun playing with my primitive drawing application! (49:50)

- DIE DIE DIE MOVIE DIEEEEEEE

- Red China is free compared to DPRK, but then I realized it's not free because a news program showed Ahmadinejad's face. Even showing his face is an affront to freedom. (52:15)

- Then the movie shows some Australian guy talking about DPRK saying how it's not as big of a threat as it's made out to be and it actually feels very threatened by the US and by the Team Spirit exercises. I guess this is supposed to be a favorable comment? (???). But it's completely depriving every ounce of DIGNITY from the DPRK's resistance! The DPRK does not resist because it is afraid; it resists because that is the honorable path.

- Euro douche explains his Euro-douche ethics. He feels guilty for having visited DPRK because the money he paid for the tour supports the oppression of Korean people. (53:50)

- North Koreans are forced to be immaterialistic; they are being oppressed, they should be allowed to be materialistic and shallow. (54:15)

- North Koreans are not special or honorable, they are the same as all the other people in the world. But somewhere in their history, things went terribly wrong. This is followed by a SUPER SUBTLE cut to a shot of Kim Jong-il reviewing an KPA artillery unit. Euro douche understands no language if not the language of subtlety. (54:40)

- Euro douche gives Koreans the most backhanded compliment in the history of the world (55:30)

- Euro douche is impressed by mass games but somehow misses the point that mass games are not impressive in spite of the lack of much use of technology; it is impressive specifically BECAUSE it is a show performed by human beings' cooperation and teamwork, with minimal accompaniment from machines. (55:50)

- Life in the DPRK could improve if only the country opened up its borders so foreign businesses could open up sweatshops. Come on, Koreans, get your heads straight! (56:15)

- They never used a computer before!!! What kind of a life is that, am I right??? (56:30)

- I mean come on, they've never even heard of wikipedia, iphones, or google! They are living in the dark ages, guys. (56:40)

 

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

 

To write these notes I watched the last segment again, twice. Not a good idea.

 

 

 

Ya Ali

Edited by baradar_jackson
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Why are you so obsessed with DPRK dear Baradar? I find that disturbing.

 

I could write pages and pages on this, but I will sum up my reasoning like so:

 

1) DPRK's impressive feats in terms of building a welfare state. I am not talking about present day, as I realize that today it is a very poor country. I am talking about the 1950s-1970s. When South Korea had the per capita income on par with your average sub-Saharan African country (and being an American puppet while doing so), the DPRK had things which no other Third World country could even imagine in their wildest dreams: universal literacy, universal free housing, total employment, universal free health care, universal free everything... And although things began to unravel for the DPRK's system in the late 1980s, I don't think that feat should ever be forgotten. (FYI, at one point, Islamic Iran lauded DPRK's agricultural system as a model to follow). Remember that North Korea has a rather cold, harsh, dry climate compared to South Korea. A unified Korea under the governance of the DPRK could have probably produced a much more lasting success in this regard. But it was of course prevented by foreign forces.

 

2) Let's face it: DPRK has always been there for us. Much like Syria, but more remarkable considering the wide geographic and cultural gap. They were there for us when hardly anyone else was. North Korean officers trained Iranians in partisan tactics. Kim Il-sung said he was willing to offer Iran everything, from bullets to ballistic missiles, and hoped that one day Iran would produce many of these weapons on its own. Do you wonder how it happened that DPRK launched its first satellite very shortly after Iran launched its first? For years and years and years, the DPRK helped Iran with rocket technology. They didn't just sell missiles to Iran, they transferred know-how. DPRK was in many ways the stepmother of Iran's rocket program. It was largely thanks to them that Iran advanced as far as it did. At some point in time (around the time of the Shahab-3B), Iran surpassed DPRK in rocket technology. And when that happened, Iran returned the favor. As was the correct thing to do. And thus, shortly after the Safir Omid made its way into space, so did the DPRK's maiden satellite.

 

3) Culturally, there is a lot to respect about DPRK. There is much to respect about a people who have endured so much hardship and yet yield NOTHING to their enemies. It makes me sad to compare them to ourselves. We Iranians will whine to no end about the price of eggs. But North Koreans are truly a patient, hard-working and honorable people. They do not complain about hardship; they fight through it. It does not weaken their will at all. They even had a slogan for a long time (I am paraphrasing): "Let us gaze at the stars while we work." (i.e. let's work well into the night). They are selfless; I can say -- from everything I have read about them, it appears as though every public manifestation of selfishness has been uprooted from their society. And then there's the art. Their art has failed to become corrupted by the degenerate art so prevalent in the world. (Any nation that gifts this to the world has already proved its worth.)

 

 

 

A lot is said about the DPRK in the powerful news media, and none of it is good. But we, as Shias, know that the news media is full of c.rap, just from our direct experience with it. Therefore, it is our obligation to either abstain from having an opinion, or to study more closely and reach an opinion only with a more completely body of information. This I would consider to be good introductory reading. It's a short book by Bruce Cumings, a man known to be THE Korea scholar in the West. He is probably best known for writing a trillion page long multi-volume history of the Korean War. He is not a celebrity academic so you won't see him on TV (in fact I don't even know what his face looks like) but he is the real deal as far as credentials go. Nobody knows Korea like him.

 

So, with all due respect, brother, I find it disturbing that you find my obsession disturbing.

Edited by baradar_jackson
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But, they eat dog meat for crying out loud!~ My two dogs were sitting with me just now happily reading the posts with me and when I opened yours they cringed away, whined and are now hiding under the bed!

 

Sorry just kidding of course. ^^  Thanks for illuminating things up about DPRK.

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No worries.

 

I just noticed that I didn't complete this thought:

 

Remember that North Korea has a rather cold, harsh, dry climate compared to South Korea.

 

Meaning, the North does not have ideal agricultural land. Their land is not very fertile. After natural disasters in the 1980s led to bad harvests (coinciding also with Gorbachev dialing back Russian economic relations with the DPRK), they turned to desperate measures such as a "claim the mountains" campaign.

 

If a small country has crop failures and no expansive economic relations with any country capable of filling the void left by the drop in domestic food production... you're gonna have a bad time.

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Salaam,

 

I watched what I felt to be the most fulfilling documentary. 

Especially if you have such a longing to go back to Khorasan, then you will enjoy this. It felt almost like a virtual Ziyarah. The beginning of the documentary completely takes you through a recollection of the sounds and feelings that you experience when walking through the sahn's of Mashhad. If you close your eyes and imagine yourself there you will truly get the experience. If you watch this with your eyes opened, you will see glimpses of the feet of pilmgrims walking through the courtyards, and it triggers your memory: You'll remember your strides as you were walking through the haram thinking: "This courtyard, this piece of the haram is never ending, I can't imagine the rest". The du'a that echoes throughout the whole courtyard as your walking, with that serene and melodious tone. But then hearing the jumbled mixture of languages in the background. Then there are the trumpets. Oh you can't forget those! Being at the haram for salatul Fajr and hearing them soon after. Hearing the cries and pleads of people duaing at every corner of the shrine. All of it, it's devastating. The rest of the documentary you get a respectable interview from the Shoe Collectors at the haram. What a blessing. They say some very beautiful things, you see life through such an honorable lens. It continues with more recollections as it gives you glimpses of different pilgrims inside the haram. It will also give you glimpses of different corners of different journeys that you experience at the haram. For example: It shows the rush of people (shoving and pushing) just to be able to go through the doors and see the glistening shrine of Imam Reda (as) and you can't help but remember, how you almost got killed in that mob of people while trying to do the same. lol. How while being in that place at that time it becomes your one and only goal: to touch the haram. Oh and it will show you the top of the pillar where the group of men play the trumpets. :)

 

It indescribable, I'm terrible at describing it. Just watch it please: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUMQaphcEAA

 

God, it's heartbreaking :cry:  :cry:  :cry:

 

Assalamu Alayka Ya Gharibul Ghorabah

Edited by jannahismygoal
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Ghosts of Rwanda

 

70016496.jpg

 

           - thoughts that I felt I need to share

 

So when is it right to do something,
and when is it wrong?
When do you decide?
How do you decide?
How do you know when to act?
Who decides?
Who gets to decide?

Make sure you can discern between good and evil.
It is so important to be able to recognize evil when you see it, when it is there.

 

'and as I was looking at them, and shaking their hands I noticed something happened that turned them into non-human things... and I saw I was not talking with humans, I literally was talking with evil...  and I had to ask myself, Do I do it... Do I negotiate with the devil to save people, or do I wipe it out, right there... I still haven't answered that question.'  - from the movie

 

I wonder, does anybody recall my earlier heartcry...
"With tears I sit here and say... What can they do?  What can they do?
What can the world do?"
http://www.shiachat.com/forum/index.php?/topic/235016901-syria-the-latest/

Why does this happen?
Why... how... do people do this to another?
and most important...

How do we make sure that we do not ever do it to another.

 

I think everyone should watch. 

Salaam.

Edited by CLynn
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very interesting and a recommended watch- I would especially recommend it to non Muslims like Clynn :) you will find it very interesting as you are a clever adn open minded lady

 

wa salam

 

Greetings hussain abass,

 

I actually have seen the halal killing once before... however, I can not stand to watch an animal being slaughtered.

I have more and more become a vegetarian... prefer to eat vegetables, grains, and fruits.

 

Salaam and blessings,

CLynn

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmDax0UjanQ

 

Второе Крещение Руси - the Second Baptism of Rus.

 

A documentary by Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk. I just watched it on television. Beginning at the beginning with the conversion of St. Vladimir equal-to-the-apostles and the mass baptism of the people in the Dnieper River (which runs through Ukraine, Russia and Belarus) then proceeding through the Communist persecution of the Church all the way up to the present resurgence and restoration which has taken place since the Soviet State collapsed.

 

It is an undoubted and undeniable miracle. Just for sense of scale - in 1970 there were more Protestants than all Russian Orthodox taken together in the entire world. By 1990, the year I was born, there were more Russian Orthodox in Russia alone than all forty thousand plus Protestant sects taken together worldwide. From State enforced atheism - to a Christian State. After long decades of force and brutality wielded, with all the advantages afforded by industrialism and modern technology for the purpose, together with all media and academia in an open attempt to bring the Church in the Rus to literal extinction - to eighty percent of the country being Orthodox Christian and this in only a quarter of the time of that concentrated attempt to extinguish the Christian religion.

 

It then documents the current state and strength of the Russian Orthodox Church. Beginning within Russia itself, then Ukraine (it was very moving to see so many people crowding the streets chanting "our Patriarch Kyrill!"), Belarus, Moldavia, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Japan (extraordinary to see; I did not realise how strong Orthodoxy was there), China and Siberia. It ends by showing on a rotating globe that there is a significant Russian Orthodox presence in more or less every country in the world.

 

I enjoyed it immensely. The cinematography was brilliant, the music is quite good. It is an excellent overall introduction to Orthodoxy today with several interviews, footage of monasteries, convents, seminaries, care of the elderly and orphans, schools, Icon painting, church restoration, book production, how candles are made and Divine Liturgy celebrated on three continents. As well as an extended interview with Vladimir Putin, some of which is translated here.

 

Sadly there is no version with English subtitles yet, but an interested viewer may still enjoy watching it.

Edited by Servidor
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  • Advanced Member

man-of-tai-chi%5B1%5D.jpg

 

Decent, wouldn't recommend to anyone though.

 

 

vod91.jpg

 

Great film, everyone should watch it.

 

 

And I just started watching 'Breaking Bad'; well, I say just started - I finished season one in about two days. It's actually pretty good.

 

haha. i told u it was good! i liked donnie brasco too.

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^Oh, wow! I have to check this out. I'm a big fan of the cinema, and North Korean film sounds particularly exotic.

 

Have a few classic Soviet films (Potempkin, Ballad of a Soldier, Cranes are Flying, Solaris) on my external drive too, but sadly, the subtitles were not functioning for anything other than Solaris.

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^Oh, wow! I have to check this out. I'm a big fan of the cinema, and North Korean film sounds particularly exotic.

 

Have a few classic Soviet films (Potempkin, Ballad of a Soldier, Cranes are Flying, Solaris) on my external drive too, but sadly, the subtitles were not functioning for anything other than Solaris.

 

I like all those movies you mentioned. But I feel that The Flower Girl is superior, both as a movie, and ideologically.

 

Take Battleship Potemkin, for example. Even though it is based on an actual event, it is too shrill in its propaganda for one to truly accept it as a historical piece. 

 

The Flower Girl is also propagandistic (as are most movies, at their core), but the driving force behind it is emotion rather than ideological proselytization. And that, in my opinion, makes it earn a better placement in one's heart. 

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