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What Have You Watched Recently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]

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Mimi and wife gone to see the Royal Shakespeare Company's Romeo and Juliet  @ the Barbican. They sent this from the stalls.

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Edited by Haji 2003

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Im just going to leave this right here, because if you want to understand what is going on in America, you need to watch it.

Be forewarned that there are parts that the more emotional members of the forum will interpret as being unfavorable towards Iran/Khomeini but also keep in mind that this movie is made by a British Westerner and thus, his views are colored by the propaganda of our countries. Having said that and given the more sensitive members their trigger warning,  I'd really appreciate all of you who are open minded to give it a watch and let me know how it strikes you, because I believe that this is what is really happening to my country and is a big part of why I have taken the dissident views I have taken lately against the elites in my country, and why I look to Shia Islam as a means to the liberation of everyday Americans such as myself. 

This is a documentary film and covers some of the rise of my idiot president, which means that there is footage of foul language from racist protestors at one point in the film, and there is footage of war in Syria which is violent as well. No nudity or sex stuff though.

It is a tough movie to get through and upset me quite a bit to realize that this is the system I am trapped within, so again, be warned but be warned because I believe it rather than because it is sensational fictional trash.

If you do this for me and give me your serious thoughts, I will not be able to thank you enough.

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On 12/16/2018 at 7:31 AM, Asgharabbasali said:

I am trying to get far away from movies. Seasons dramas. But it is also discussed here. No where is isolated from israeli westren virus. Why cannot we discuss islamic movies?  :/

Please do. I'm sure people would like to hear your descriptions of Islamic movies and videos that you've seen. 

Or feel free to ignore discussions that you do not wish to see. Shiachat is for all types of people. 

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The Hollow Crown: Richard II (2012)

This is a film-length rendition of Shakespeare's Richard II. I said rendition not adaptation because the dialogue is exactly the same as in the original play. So if you like the Bard and want to see those magnificent Olde English dialogues acted out, watch this. This is first of the four-part series of Shakespeare's royal plays. Very well done. 5/5

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First Man (2018)

Some will say it's just fiction anyway (pun intended), but this film claims to be a faithful account of the events leading to the moon landing. Don't expect this to be your run-of-the-mill sci fi space exploration movie with stunning graphics and plot twists, for this is based on Neil Armstrong and NASA's space race with the Soviets to get as far in the space as possible. The story has a personal touch and the most exciting moment doesn't come until the last and ends too soon. But it's still good for the lazy ones like myself who'd like to know more about the moon landing by watching than by reading. 4/5

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13 Assassins (2010)

The problem with many Japanese films I've seen is their lack of subtlety. The villains are extremely villainous and the heroes are paragons of goodness. And there is also something about the way they speak. Everyone seems to be shouting at the top of their voices, even if the situation doesn't call for it. It might well be cultural or could just be an issue of dialogue delivery. So If you can tolerate cardboard characters but want to enjoy great and extended samurai fighting scenes, this is for you. It also comes with good visuals of the late Edo period of Japan, before the Meiji restoration, so well worth the time. 3/5

Edited by Marbles

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Quote

Joe Ayella is a graduate of New York Film Academy’s short-term filmmaking workshop in Portugal. His documentary American Coup tells the story of the 1953 coup carried out by the CIA to topple the popular Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh. The film is a mix of rare archival footage and stills and interviews with Middle East experts, historians, and authors.  Among the many interviewees are Stephen Kinzer (author, All The Shah’s Men), Prof. Ervand Abrahamian of Baruch College, Trita Parsi, Ph.D., Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, Nuclear Expert Joe Cirincione Amb. Bruce Laingen, Amb. John Limbert, Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, and legendary newsman Ted Koppel.  Stand-up comic Maz Jobrani (Axis of Evil Comedy Tour) also makes an appearance. Check out what Joe had to say about his film….

https://www.nyfa.edu/film-school-blog/new-york-film-academy-graduate-tackles-the-1953-cia-coup-in-new-documentary/

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Just finished the 32 part Iranian serial about Imam Ridha (as). It was quite good, I could follow it a lot better than the Mukhtar series and I appreciate being able to learn more details about the story and put a visual to what we read in history. 

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Saw this on Amazon Prime. Interesting take on the Tarzan genre with Tarzan taking on the Belgian King Leopold's henchmen, who are trying to secure the Congo for the King. This is a new take on the Tarzan story and there is a neat fit, I think.

It also helpfully, credibly and somewhat realistically introduces completely ignorant audiences to the reality of Belgian colonialism which was one of the most vicious around.

Less helpfully I can't help but be reminded of my reaction to the movie 'Cry Freedom' when it came out 31 years ago. It was tangentially about the anti-apartheid campaigner Steve Biko, but the main role went to Donald Woods, the white newspaperman. At the time that movie came out, I also saw 'La Vie est Belle' about life in Kinshasa. The French language movie I felt did more for the African cause insofar as it showed the indigenous population being masters of their own destiny.

For me 'Cry Freedom' and 'Tarzan' admit to wrongs committed by white colonial powers, but at the same time show that addressing those wrongs is also by the grace of white people.

As a movie Tarzan works.

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On Thu Dec 20 2018 at 2:59 AM, ireallywannaknow said:

Just finished the 32 part Iranian serial about Imam Ridha (as). It was quite good, I could follow it a lot better than the Mukhtar series and I appreciate being able to learn more details about the story and put a visual to what we read in history. 

Salaam

Was it Ghareeb e Toos or different one?

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On 12/16/2018 at 7:31 AM, Asgharabbasali said:

I am trying to get far away from movies. Seasons dramas. But it is also discussed here. No where is isolated from israeli westren virus. Why cannot we discuss islamic movies?  :/

It is indeed a shame that we find some Zionist movies (like Hollywood), which are created with the evilest intentions, in this sub on this website, just for watching etc. But " There is a piece of advice in everything for the clever " - Imam Ali (AS)
 

https://notices.californiatimes.com/gdpr/latimes.com/ Joel Stein 2008 LA Times - Who runs Hollywood? C'mon

https://www.presstv.com/Default/Section/15068/  Hollywood Cut - PressTV

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On 12/24/2018 at 10:39 PM, notme said:

@Marbles two of those in your most recent post look like ones I'd enjoy. One, I might even end up adding to my small DVD collection, if it's worth rewatching. 

It'd be interesting to know what you make of the Armstrong film.

On 12/21/2018 at 5:52 PM, Haji 2003 said:

For me 'Cry Freedom' and 'Tarzan' admit to wrongs committed by white colonial powers, but at the same time show that addressing those wrongs is also by the grace of white people.

White Saviour Complex in Western letters and cinema is a norm rather than an exception, although with time the depictions have become quite nuanced.

 

Anyway, there is a consensus among cinephiles that film adaptations of literary works are often lazy caricatures of the novels they are based on, in large part due to the limitations of the art medium. But I do think it depends on the genre, for ex. sci-fi and whodunits based on books work much better than knotty plot dramas like Anna Karenina (which was an awful film of a great novel). 

Recently I watched the following, all of these are based on books and well-done.

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Silence (2016)

Based on the historical novel of Shusaku Endo, this film relates the story of the Portuguese Jesuit missionary attempts to spread Christianity in Japan in the 17th C. They managed to gain hundreds of thousands of converts until the Shogunate came down hard on the foreign priests as well as local converts. They were violently suppressed and the new religion outlawed, but the psychological torture they employed to break the spirit of the faithfuls is what is so well captured in the film. There are very good historical reasons why Christianity took root in the Korean peninsula but not in Japan. Great visuals of the period. 5/5

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Murder on the Orient Express (2017)

Hercule Poirot returns to showcase his remarkable detective skills and splendid mustache on screen. Good ol' Agatha is still very much alive.

Great family entertainment but don't check your FB feed or answer the doorbell while the film is playing or you'll miss stuff. 4/5

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Alias Grace (2017 tv series)

Here's another fine example of how to translate a complex psychological drama with unreliable first person narrator on the screen. Plus point for me is that it's a period piece and takes you back in the mid-19th C and based on Margaret Atwood's novel of the same name. The good thing? It's short, precise, and single-season series with six episodes. So not unlike a long film in which you get to know the characters very well and be able to empathise with them better than in an average film. 5/5

Sarah Gadon played the Irish character of Grace Marks and I'm amazed at how well she's adapted to the Irish accent despite not being Irish herself.

Her beauty gets a smiley from me :love:

 

 

Edited by Marbles
typos

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On 12/26/2018 at 5:32 AM, Marbles said:

White Saviour Complex in Western letters and cinema is a norm rather than an exception, although with time the depictions have become quite nuanced.

Leonardo di Caprio does not want to be one in Blood Diamond, but can't escape his destiny.

On 12/26/2018 at 5:32 AM, Marbles said:

Silence (2016)

Based on the historical novel of Shusaku Endo,

Thanks for the heads-up.

All sorts of garbage comes up in the list of movies that Amazon Prime has available for me, but only when I searched for this just now did I realise that this was also available free to watch.

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Cargo (2017)

We have had enough zombie apocalyptic films. We really don't want more. But I noticed this comes from the producer of The Babadook (2014), which I appreciated as an arthouse horror/thriller that does not spend too much time on scary visuals but on developing a larger menace that looms large over the place . This film focuses on the personal survival journey of one couple and their wee daughter when things go awry. The shift of focus away from the hordes of ugly zombies and half-baked attempts to understand the cause and to fix it was a welcome departure from the conventional tropes of the genre. It's not until the last scene you understand the title of the film. Martin Freeman has been excellent. 5/5

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Outlaw King (2018)

This chronicles the life and struggles of Robert Bruce, King of Scotland, who defeated the mighty English army against all odds in the early 14th C and managed to retain Scottish independence for centuries to come. I liked the visuals but the film doesn't have the x-factor to be a successful biopic. If it didn't fall flat, it's mediocre at best. 2.5/5

 

Edited by Marbles

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:coffee:

I have been enjoying the (semi-fictionalised) biography of Yunus Emre on Netflix over this year.

Watching in Turkish, with subtitles - has been interesting, because some reasonable interpretation is required (the subs are not perfect, and sometimes takes some puzzle solving later on while watching an episode to figure out exactly what has been said - but the general statements and meanings of more mystical parts are clear to follow).

Netflix has been reasonably good at making international Film & Drama more accessible, and I think that Turkish cultural series like Yunus Emre & Dirilis: Ertugul are seeing some cult following among Muslims in the west, as a shared nostalgia - and underrepresented historical genre.
Netflix has its issues too, and really if paying close attention, a strong Secular Liberal Humanist theme can be seen in the content they highlight - which is to be expected from a Silicon Valley media company to be fair.


The early episodes of Yunus Emre are definitely a bit slow-paced and long to get through; so it's more of an Escapism, than a really riveting story for me.
I manage maybe two episodes every couple of weeks on average - and strangely they have lined up with my calendar in a really topical way.

e.g. around Muharram time, I reached a part in the story where the Dervish lodge in the series, are celebrating Ashura (in a very different way to present day Shia Ithna'Asheri of course) - but it was still brilliant to hear Imam Hussein's name mentioned with reverence - it's not why I started watching, and took me by surprise.

This image below maybe captures a little slice of the feeling;
It's definitely not a comfortable series to watch, if you don't like engaging in critique / debate of Islamic Orthodoxy - as it is very Sufi leaning. Part of the story also has themes of debate between the emphasis on Fiqh & Irfan - but Alhamdulillah, I feel like it's done with thought & respect.

For the most part - I think if I have a choice to expose my mind to gratuitous violence, profanity & obscenity as entertainment, (which unfortunately was happening all too regularly), or this... I feel that this series has made a healthy impact on my life :):pushup::pushup2:

Wa Salaam & Enjoy!

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