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Saddam's Mother Prostitute

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Well known to pretty much All iraqis- is the story of Saddam's mother being a prostitute. I had always heard this growing up from my father - as well as relatives/friends in Iraq. In fact the rumor started from his own tribesmen in tikrit.

The most famous version among Iraqis of this is the following:

The shaikh in the video is saying that Saddam's mother (a prostitute) conceived Saddam through a jewish client, and while pregnant with Saddam his mother moved in with a tikriti man named Hussain - and thats how Saddam got his middle name (In iraq the children take their fathers name as their middle name) - Saddam Hussain Al-Tikriti.

Ironically the video has been put up by baathis/wahhabis who have titled it - rafadhi insult towards saddam's mother.

This story has also found its way in to western media as well:

http://www.meforum.o...23/the-monument

Makiya explores how, with increasing megalomania, Saddam sought to tie himself to legendary Islamic figures. He depicted himself on a white horse, drawing a clear parallel to Hussein, one of Shi‘ite Islam's most revered figures. Saddam—always sensitive to whispers that his mother was a prostitute—published a family tree showing direct descent to ‘Ali, the fourth caliph and the patron saint of Shi‘ism.

A different version of the story in which Saddam's mother sought to abort him, but was persuaded not to by a Jewish family in tikrit:

An Iraqi Jewish family took in Saddam Hussein’s mother in 1937 and talked her out of an abortion, according to Israel’s leading expert on Iraq and the large traditional Jewish community that once prospered there.

“The story is true,” says Amatzia Baram. “I’ve pretty much confirmed all of the details, but the family doesn’t like to talk about it. There was this fear that people would blame the Jews for Saddam.

The family, originally from Tikrit, Hussein’s birthplace, lives in Or Yehuda, home to a large community of Iraqi exiles in Israel, says Baram. The family befriended Hussein’s mother while she was pregnant with the future dictator. One of only two Jewish families in Tikrit at the time, they took in the woman and persuaded her not to abort, reports South Florida’s Sun-Sentinel.

“After it became public, the family got this angry response from some people saying they should have done something,” said Baram. “But it was ridiculous. We weren’t talking about killing a dictator but a fetus.”

About a decade after the birth of Hussein, Jews across Iraq began a secret exodus of Iraq’s increasingly besieged Jewish community to the new state of Israel.

http://www.wnd.com/2003/03/17569/

A similar story written in a psychological profile of the dictator:

Saddam Hussein was born in 1937 to a poor peasant family near Tikrit, some 100 miles north of Baghdad, in central-north Iraq. But the central lines of the development of Saddam Hussein’s political personality were etched before he was born, for his father died of an “internal disease” (probably cancer) during his mother’s pregnancy with Saddam, and his 12-year-old brother died (of childhood cancer) a few months later, when Saddam’s mother, Sabha, was in her eighth month of pregnancy. Destitute, Saddam’s mother attempted suicide. A Jewish family saved her. Then she tried to abort herself of Saddam, but was again prevented from doing this by her Jewish benefactors. After Saddam was born, on April 28, 1937, his mother did not wish to see him, strongly suggesting that she was suffering from a major depression. His care was relegated to Sabha’s brother (his maternal uncle) Khayrallah Talfah Msallat in Tikrit, in whose home Saddam spent much of his early childhood. At age three Saddam was re-united with his mother, who in the interim had married a distant relative, Hajj Ibrahim Hasan. Hajj Ibrahim, his step-father, reportedly was abusive psychologically and physically to young Saddam.

http://law.cwru.edu/...ogy_profile.pdf

An article about the romance novels Saddam wrote during his life:

Heroes and villains

Saddam Hussein's romantic novels are not the first examples of a dictator turning his hand from politics to fiction.

In an isolated prison cell, an ageing, mustachioed gentleman sits writing at a small canteen table. Recent months have seen a stark change in his fortunes. Gone are the Gucci suits and the French hair dye. Gone is the entourage of supporters. He has no idea if the novel he is working on, an epic allegorical tale of passion and revenge, will ever be published.

Provisionally entitled The Great Awakening, his fifth novel will emerge into a very different critical climate from that which greeted the others. In his home country, his works were acclaimed, with sales said to run into millions. One was made into a 20-part TV series. It had been announced that his books were to become part of the national curriculum. And then the regime changed.

For eight years, Saddam Hussein has been carving out an alternative career as a writer of romantic and fantasy fiction, full of thinly veiled political allegory, grandiose rhetoric and autobiography. He has published four novels in less than five years - prolific for someone whose day job was, presumably, fairly demanding.

Many statesmen and revolutionaries have been consummate writers of prose and poetry. Saddam, however, is part of a less honourable tradition of despots who have turned their attentions to the arts. From Nero to Napoleon, Hitler to Mao, there is sufficient output to suggest that we acknowledge this as a genre in its own right: dictator literature.

As with any genre, the range of dic-lit talent runs from the literary to the populist. Fellow Middle Eastern

autocrat and dic-lit star Colonel Muammar Gadafy has built a literary reputation based on a 1998 collection of short-story fiction entitled The Village, the Village, the Earth, the Earth and the Suicide of the Astronaut. An international edition, retitled Escape to Hell and Other Stories, included a foreword from Pierre Salinger, one of JFK's press spokesmen, who said the writings provided an insight into a unique mind.

Saddam's writing is at the other end of the dic-lit spectrum, following a populist family tradition. His uncle, a former mayor of Baghdad and an influential local tyrant himself, contributed to the genre with a book entitled He Created Them By Mistake: The Persians, Jews and Flies, published in 1974. His masterstroke was to make 20,000 Iraqi schools purchase 50 copies each. Result: a million-seller, and no marketing spend at all.

What motivates dic-lit authors? They know critical reaction to their work is unlikely to be genuine. It may be that the act of creating "art" is an extension of the urge to control. Fiction in particular offers the author a malleable world. But just because he was a brutal dictator, should Saddam be excluded from a place in literary history? Many great writers were not great human beings - perhaps Saddam merely had more scope to realise his vision.

Of Saddam's four novels - Zabibah and the King, The Fortified Castle, Men and the City and Be Gone, Demons! - the first remains the best known and best-selling. Published in 2000, it is a torrid, romantic tale with an obvious political analogy. Zabibah, the heroine, represents Iraq; her cruel husband is America; and the strong but vengeful king is Saddam. "Once upon a time," the fairytale-like story opens, "there was a great and powerful king ... His influence was widespread ... He was surrounded by respect, peace, love, and trust as well as awe and fear ... This king was obeyed by his people, either willingly or by force."

Zabibah, unhappily married, falls in love with the king and they develop an intimate friendship. " 'Do the people need strict measures from their king?' he asks. 'Yes, your majesty,' she replies. 'The people need strict measures so that they can feel protected.' " Such exchanges may be understood as Saddam exploring his personal demons. The king always has the last word as their discussions range over themes of power, cruelty, justice, nature and tradition.

Then, one night, Zabibah is attacked and raped by a hooded stranger. The stranger turns out to be her husband (the Americans!) and so the incident offers the king an opportunity to take vengeance. A great battle follows, coinciding with the 1991 Desert Storm assault of the Kuwait war. But in this case, US forces are symbolically defeated, as the vicious husband is killed. Order is restored, though, tragically, neither Zabibah nor the king lives to see it.

On the back of this tour de force came The Fortified Castle which, like Zabibah, also veils a political agenda with romance. Set after the 1991 war, it tells the story of an ex-soldier who falls for a girl from northern Iraq (balm to Saddam's actual policies against the Kurds). The subplot - a servant running off with the master's sister - is a clear reference to Saddam's feelings of betrayal by the Kuwaitis.

The third, a biographical novel, Men and the City, is based on the rise of the Ba'ath party. It features a tableau of relatives, including Saddam's uncle and grandfather. But it is in the fourth novel that Saddam focuses on his favourite genre: military literature. Be Gone, Demons! follows an Arab nobleman, Salim, in his battle to defeat his American and Jewish enemies (both recast as ancient-style foreign tribes) in a mission that mirrors the attack on the World Trade Centre in New York in 2001.

By this point in Saddam's literary career, US and Jewish hegemony has become an obsession. With the book completed in the run-up to the 2003 war (no wonder Iraqi forces had no strategy), the presidential publisher Al-Hurriah (meaning "freedom") managed to print just 40,000 copies of Be Gone, Demons! before the fall of Baghdad to US forces. As with all his books, Saddam's name is absent from the cover. He prefers the phrase: "A novel written by its author."

It is easy to see why the CIA, MI6 and Mossad have analysed these outlandish tales in detail. Avi Rubin, an ex-Mossad agent, believes that Saddam's past is at the core of his anger against seemingly broader targets such as western civilisation and Jews. "In reality," Rubin argues, "he is speaking about the pain of his own childhood and upbringing."

Indeed, that childhood is as freakish as any of his fictions. Saddam's mother was a prostitute, he was gang-raped by homosexuals at the age of 10, and as a teenager was refused admission to Iraq's top military school. The inspiration for Zabibah was probably his fourth wife, Iman, 40 years his junior, whom he adored and married a few years ago, aged 63.

So dic-lit may be seen as a confessional genre. But what of the writing? Does Saddam have talent in the romantic fantasy genre? I sent extracts of Zabibah and the King "blind" to some experts. The editor at Mills and Boon, after agreeing to comment, backed out when she discovered who the author was. But JoJo Moyes, winner of the Romantic Novelists' Association novel of the year award, agreed, and was alarmed by the style. With the first four paragraphs of the book containing no less than 13 rhetorical questions, she pointed out that the author was not interested in his readers. "I had a fear that it was by Osama bin Laden or Alastair Campbell," she said, trying to guess the author. "Once I knew who it was, it all made sense. His writing was the literary equivalent of those lurid fantasy murals he had painted all over his palaces."

Tina Phillips, a consultant researcher at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, is surprised that Saddam chose the novel at all, as in wider Islamic culture it is the poet who is most revered. And in Iraq, fiction was all but banned by Saddam. Perhaps, in any case, he was not the real author of the works. There are rumours that a ghostwriter was poisoned to keep the truth secret. But even if Saddam did not write every word then, he is certainly writing them all now.

The obvious conclusion from the work is that we are looking at an author who is insecure, untalented and delusional. Is he alone among dic-lit authors? Clearly not.

But Colonel Gadafy, by comparison, is an authentic voice who has carved out a new narrative form derived from traditional popular culture. His writing has shades of Russian literature interestingly transposed on to an environment of modern urban decay and psychological pollution. "By the nature of city life, one's purpose becomes self-interest and opportunism. And one's norm of behaviour becomes hypocrisy," Gaddafi has written with, if not great originality, then at least some perceptiveness.

Saddam's writing seems more a consolation for his political failings. He knew that his career as an overlord was on the wane after the 1991 Gulf war, and it is no coincidence that this is when his literary endeavours began. His translator, Sa'adoon al-Zubaydi, maintains that, fuelled by the good notices for Zabibah, he began to retreat into his own internal world. He increasingly came to use body doubles rather than meeting his armed forces face to face.

The Iraqi poet Nabeel Yasin argues that the mixture of fact and fiction in his books is there to create an emotional and political utopia (like fellow jailbird and fantasist Jeffrey Archer, Saddam bases his novels on the reinvention of the facts of his own life). And according to Zubaydi, Saddam "longed for a return to some original state of purity". As one literary Jordanian put it: "He writes about the world as he would like it to be. The lost Kurdish girl can fall in love with the disbanded Iraqi soldier, and the king can rule on in peace, loved and respected by his people."

For now, we can only speculate about whether his inner life will sustain the former Iraqi leader, like Archer or Oscar Wilde, through his incarceration and trial. Knowing Saddam's writing, however, he won't be giving us The Ballad of Abu Ghraib.

· This is an edited version of an article which appears in this month's edition of Prospect magazine.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

According to Iranians, it is a well known fact that Saddam's name was simply Saddam al-Takriti, because his mother never would reveal the name of his father, not even to her own family. Saddam took power in Iraq and he also took the name Hussein, as if to boast that he was just as good as King Hussein of Jordan, who always bragged about being Hashemite.

If you knew about Saddam, you would know that he executed hundreds of thousands of people, including his own relatives. He probably assassinated the four witnesses.

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Saddam doesn't have a father. No man has ever claimed Saddam as his son. I think most people knew that his mother was a prostitute. It would be almost impossible to trace saddam to his father. There are usually a number of potential "clients" that can be his father.

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I don't think anyone should be accused of being a prostitute on the basis of rumours, no matter who her son is.

(bismillah)

(salam)

True. ^^^ I only said she refused to say who Saddam's father was. It could have been a one time misyar event, not a professional job for her.

The thought that Saddam wrote romance novels was really gross. :sick:

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If you guys watch the video - even very respected scholars mention this incident, any way its not really even a rumor ive never heard any sort of debate on it. Again people in tikrit even said they say his mother working as a prostitute. Why in the world are you guys even surprised.

A common rumour doesn't change the fact that it is a rumour. What hard facts are there to substantiate this? Do you have the names of any of these people that claimed to have seen Saddam's mother working as a prostitute?

Its like when people talk about all the opressors of ahlulbayt and their lineage. Are their four witnesses for all of them? Usually its based on peoples historical accounts - and 90% of history is mentioned through accounts which are not mutawatir - meaning they can not be proven -with out a doubt.

That's why I don't see the point on dwelling over whether so-and-so's mother was a prostitute, or whether another person was the result of incest or whatever. It is completely irrevelant. Why not just focus on the actual crimes they committed?

If you want to use that standard - you might as well just reject all of history.

Not really.

Lastly its Saddam - if your defending saddam in any way - you need a reality check, you might as well be on here claiming we cant prove Yazeed did xyz and hes dead so there is no point.

No, it's Saddam's mother. Do you have any proof that she was a bad person, who deserved having this stuff said about her after she is dead?

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Salam, i don't know, this sounds a lot like the crazy made-up stories that Iraqis tend to fabricate and spread like wild-fire...

i would prefer to see solid evidence. Especially since accusing a believing woman of such a thing is such a major sin in Islam

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this is just so GAY from a shia chat admin to post such thing....saddam is already dead now what is the point to bring up...if his mom was prostitute or not....

This may come as a surprise to you, but history usually involves the study of people who are dead. And if they or their relatives did dodgy things - that tends to come up too.

Best to verify and document all this now, while it is still fresh. A couple of hundred years from now, the Yazidis of the future will be trying to whitewash history and transpose the character of Nasrallah onto Saddam.

They do that you know.

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Its not good to insult some1s mother. who knws? what she had to go through if such allegation is true about her! A person isnt born as a dictator or a pious person. As ppl become older, they get to choose between right and wrong. SO no1 can blame his mother.

Also a lady doesn't just become a P.... overr a night. astaghfirullah Our society forces ppl into disgusting problems. If saddam was r**** at the age of 10, its reali sad. A 10 yr boy cant be blamed for such incident. U should blame the society. Also I dont think he was a Dictator at the age of 10!

Edited by behayaat

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Why are they all Jewish lol???

So Saddam is a Jew, Qaddafi is a Jew (this one might be possible given that odd woman that looked identical to him), Hitler is a Jew, Stalin is a Jew.

Yes we're all Jews.

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This may come as a surprise to you, but history usually involves the study of people who are dead. And if they or their relatives did dodgy things - that tends to come up too.

Best to verify and document all this now, while it is still fresh. A couple of hundred years from now, the Yazidis of the future will be trying to whitewash history and transpose the character of Nasrallah onto Saddam.

They do that you know.

Couple hundred years? Its barely been 5 years since his execution and they have already done that and continue doing that:

Here is a thread where I compiled about a dozen or so news articles on the extreme love that nawasib have for saddam (la)

http://www.shiachat.com/forum/index.php?/topic/234986008-qardawi-the-hypocrite-kill-qadafi/

Video of one of the biggest allegedly mainstream "Sunni Scholar" in the entire world - Yusuf Al Qaradhawi praising saddam and eulogizing him:

A video from world famous saudi arabian "scholar" A'adh al Qarni (this guy is HUGE in the arab world, has his own t.v shows, has broadcasted several hundred lectures world wide, has web sites etc) - Praising Saddam in Poetry

^note the above video is nearly at 8 million views.

A video praising saddam - titled "saddam hussain the shaheed of the nation (ummah)"

(over 1 million views)

Al shaheed Bi ithnillah- Saddam Hussain

Nearly 2 million views

A slide show presentation of memories of beloved baghdad and saddam hussain:

over 2.2 million views

For those who can understand Arabic i encourage you to go and read the comments and see the absurd things that they say in praise of Saddam.

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this is a very tasteless thread. Even if this is true (which it isn't) , prostitution doesn't take someone out of Islam, so you are talking ill about a dead Muslim. Allah will deal with Saddam the way He pleases.

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this is a very tasteless thread. Even if this is true (which it isn't) , prostitution doesn't take someone out of Islam, so you are talking ill about a dead Muslim. Allah will deal with Saddam the way He pleases.

And? Who said I am attacking his mother - I was only presenting to people on this Forum - what Iraqis have known for decades- that Saddam Hussain was an illegitimate, its not even about his mother really.

Allah will deal with Saddam the way He please

Allah has made it clear what he does to people like Saddam - burning in eternal hell fire.

Saddam is dead and over with. Lets focus on the other tyrants.

So we should do the same with all the tyrant Khulapha from history? They are dead and gone so no point in discussing them?

Lets just forget about Saddam, never mention him or his crimes, so that Enemies of Allah can re-write history and make him in to a Shaheed - Hero - a victim instead of an oppressor, and free him from all the crimes that he committed.

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This threat exemplifies not the tyranny and evil of Saddam as it does the primitive power of gossip and superstition found in Saddam's culture. In fact, Saddam nurtured this cultural state of mind.

.

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The amount of ignorance on this thread is unbearable.

I'm not suggesting to forget about Saddam from the history books.

I'm suggesting to focus on more significant matters taking place in the Muslim world which are still active be it the tyrants in Bahrain, Yemen, Arabia, the military regime in Egypt, and whatnot.

I don't get why some people here think Saddam>>>>>>>>>>>>>>then current matters. This is BS.

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Guest Zahratul_Islam

This threat exemplifies not the tyranny and evil of Saddam as it does the primitive power of gossip and superstition found in Saddam's culture. In fact, Saddam nurtured this cultural state of mind.

.

ROFL. Spare us your assessment Dr. Bolbol. Yes, we all know about the infamous "yo mama is a _____" cultural concentration camps of Iraq.

People from everywhere in the Middle East have used slurs against female family relatives from long before Saddam and his reign. Please stick to your day job of pretending to be a staunch anti-imperialist warrior and leave the Iraq assessment alone as you clearly know very little about his reign.

Kthanks.

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Yes, "Ibn el 9hba" is a common derogatory superstition used widely among Arabic countries, endorsed by the Saddam regime for widespread usage. It is used synonymously and loosely with people who are simply not liked.

For this reason alone, this thread should be evaluated with some criticism.

.

Edited by bolbol

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If indeed his father is unknown, then how come so many of his close brothers, cousins and male relatives, like Ali Hassan, Barzan Ibrahim, Sabawi, Watban, share such close facial features with him ? Even today in Tikrit there are several of his half-cousins who look like him, I guess all of their mothers were..... Astaghfirullah.

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His mother being a prostitute or not being a prostitute, was beyond his control.

Therefore, for this to enhance one's distaste for Saddam, is rather ridiculous. There is a mountain of crimes he committed. But if his mother was a prostitute, that was his mother's sin; not his.

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Allah has made it clear what he does to people like Saddam - burning in eternal hell fire.

Allah knows best - He will judge Saddam based on his good and bad deeds.

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If indeed his father is unknown, then how come so many of his close brothers, cousins and male relatives, like Ali Hassan, Barzan Ibrahim, Sabawi, Watban, share such close facial features with him ? Even today in Tikrit there are several of his half-cousins who look like him, I guess all of their mothers were..... Astaghfirullah.

Those are all his maternal cousins. In fact find me saddam's father, ill give you a million dollars. In fact find me one paternal relative of Saddam.

Allah knows best - He will judge Saddam based on his good and bad deeds.

Thats the ultimate divide between Sunnis and Shias - is that your religion teaches you never to judge any one, even if they were fasiq, fajir, killers, rapists and so on.

Its because of people with your mentality - the prophets grand son was slaughtered on the plains of Karbala - because you refuse to condemn tyrants.

Zina is Zina she or mufeed shouldn't be talking about the dead in that manner.

So now your hear to defend Saddam? Your worried about me accusing some one of fahsha - (mind you the dead mother of Saddam hussain, its not like im saying this about any one). This is rich, YOU are trying to tell me about accusing others of fahsha, need I remind you of your own comments against a living SHIA mumin brother (alimohammad)

His mother being a prostitute or not being a prostitute, was beyond his control.

Therefore, for this to enhance one's distaste for Saddam, is rather ridiculous. There is a mountain of crimes he committed. But if his mother was a prostitute, that was his mother's sin; not his.

Please show me any where on here where I said he is cursed BECAUSE his mother is a prostitute. I only forwarded some articles/video about the matter. Since when is forwarding information some thing insulting.

More over dont forget all the narrations about the status of illegitimacy never leaving the enemies of Ahlulbayt.

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I am an Iraqi Kurd. And even I find this extremely distasteful. He is dead, what does it matter to you now who his father was? What else more do you want than his death?

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