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In the Name of God بسم الله
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Praetorius

Abstaining From Music... How Do You Do It?

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i always tell them about stuff like this but they dont listen theres also a hadith i herd in a lecture once i dont have reference to it but it was that listening to music is like slapping imam ali a.s across the face because it is something that has been prohibited yet the believers still listen to it....

but might i just add i asked about those hadiths a while ago because i read them also and i thought well i dont listen to music and so how is it fair if my duas arnt answered because of the other people in my house... anyway i asked and the reply was it doesnt apply for people that dont listen to music and disassociate themselves from the music being played in the house so my duas are being herd and answered by Allah swt inshallah because i dont listen to music myself.....

thats great advise !!!

Salam-there will be times and places in every Muslims life where we will be exposed to music-my understanding is that we are not to allow ourselves to experience any pleasure out of it-I have friends who absolutely believe that they MUST have music to drive their car, and unfortunaately, they listen to the same music I grew up with, so whenever a song comes on the radio that I used to listen to, (and this can be a challengse if it happens to be my favorite musician from my past) I remind my self that it is forbidden-I recite prayers to myself, or think about the Quran or Islam in general...Anything that will distract myself in a halal manner. I cant remember where I read it, but I read somewhere that the reward a Muslim receives from abstaining from music in this world is that they will be able to listen to beautiful songs of birds when we are in Heaven-BIRDS ARE MY FAVORITE ANIMALS ON THIS PLANET, so if I love to listen to them HERE, how much MORE beautiful will they sound in HEAVEN?! Hope this helps :) PEACE!

Taqwa.

Simply stop listening to it.

If you break down the essence of it, just like with everything, it either takes you closer to Allah or farther away.

It plays with your emotions and is a means of controlling you. People get so caught up in music and lyrics they can't even think properly.

Nobody is forcing you to be a Mu'min, it's hard work to fulfill every mustahhab, but try your best and pray for me as well insha'Allah I pray for you.

Wasalaam

Salam-point well made about it taking you further away from Allah-For me, I used to listen to music and it would keep me emotionally tied to people,places, things in my life that are no more-In other words, it kept me lost in the past, and attached to worldly things-how far away from Allah is THAT? As a new Muslim, I believe that its VERY important for me to be in the here and the now at all times in order to keep my perspective clear-I can recite duas in my head or do other types of things instead of listening to music that will ultimately bring me closer to Allah, and to keep my intentions and motivations towards Allahs will clear-Music just distracts! My husband said 2 things to me regarding music: "Music makes people stupid", and " Music on emotions is like alcohol on the body". Well said, I think! Also, get rid orf any C.D.'s you may have in your car or within your reach-replace them with Quranic C.D.'s...This I have also done...Hope this helps:) PEACE!

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Music: An Addictive Drug by Sayed Mahdi Modaressi

I received a question from a woman a while ago about Music. I thought it was worth sharing the answer on this blog:

Question:

Salam,

I am addicted to music because listening to music makes me happy and takes my mind off problems in my life. I want to stop listening to music and want to concentrate on my faith and education; I want to spend my time reciting the Quran and reading books instead. What advice would you give me?

Answer:

Music may make you “happy” and “take your mind off your problems” in the short run. I agree. In fact, if a short term euphoric sensation is what you’re looking for, there are many more options including drugs, alcohol, and gambling! People drink bitter spirits and tolerate the nasty acidic burn of alcohol not for the taste (it is, after all, a poison) but for their intoxicating quality in order to distract them from the daily toils and personal problems. In his book “Civilization and its Discontents” Sigmund Freud actually asserts that the best means of subduing unhappiness and the most effective style of human adaptation used to secure pleasure from the world while also trying to avoid or limit suffering, is the consumption of alcohol! Surely as Muslims, indeed as rational human beings, we can’t take these options seriously given the devastating side-effects they possess.

Music is also a drug. An odorless, colorless, and thanks to the internet, largely free drug which makes you feel good (unless you’re a fan of Marylin Manson), and then leaves you with nothing but more depression and a sense of emptiness. As soon as you’re out of the concert hall, or you drop that iPod, you go back to the bitter reality that is your life and, because you can’t deal with that, you go back to music for comfort and distraction. While you’re in your little world consumed by music, Apple celebrates the 10 billionth song downloaded from iTunes at 99 cents a pop. While we feed our addiction, Steve Jobs is laughing all the way to the bank!.

So what is the first side effect of this drug; addiction. Because it creates a false euphoria, you keep going back for another fix. It completely takes over your mind and affects your judgment. The British neurologist Oliver Sacks says: “music can involve many different parts of the brain, special parts for the response to pitch, and to frequency, and to timbre, and to rhythm, and to melodic contour, and to harmonic and everything else” thus, completely occuping the brain. That is why you’ll notice that those addicted to music will often also refuse Hijab. They easily socialize with people of the opposite sex and may engage in illicit relationships.

Picture this: a pious, dignified, veiled Muslim woman jumping up and down with the tunes of a pop music concert while screaming her lungs out singing the lyrics. What’s wrong with this picture? It just doesn’t happen! You simply cannot mix chastity and piety with music, not even conceptually as you see from this illustration. This is why Islam closes the door shut to the range of possible detrimental pandemics by banning music (with very limited exceptions).

The Holy Prophet outlines this part of his mission in the following narration:

‎الله عز وجل بعثني رحمة وهدى للعالمين وأمرني أن أمحق المعازف والخمور والأوثان التي كانت تعبد في الجاهلية

The Prophet says: “Allah the exalted sent me as a mercy to the worlds and commanded me to obliterate musical instruments as well as intoxicating drinks and idols that were worshiped in the era of ignorance.”

This Hadeeth suggests that one of the main purposes for the final revelation is the banning of music, following spreading mercy to all of mankind! Notice, also, how the narration collectively refers to the “idols that were worshiped”. Could this be a reference to Music? Perhaps so, in the sense that it is, indeed, an idol for the modern era of ignorance as it was a false idol in the ancient era as well.

The argument that music also has therapeutic benefits is irrelevant, because much like alcohol, it has been proven that it influences humans both in good and bad ways. However, in our view, the harms outweigh the benefits. Here’s where it get a bit technical, but also quite interesting: Studies have shown that music affects the amplitude and frequency of brain waves, which can be measured by an electro-encephalogram. Music also affects breathing rate and electrical resistance of the skin. It has been observed to cause the pupils to dilate, increase blood pressure, and increase the heart rate.

Dr. Ballam states: “The human mind shuts down after three or four repetitions of a rhythm, or a melody, or a harmonic progression.” (Ballam, Michael. Music and the Mind, pp 1-8.). Furthermore, excessive repetition causes people to release control of their thoughts. Rhythmic repetition is used by people who are trying to push certain ethics in their music.

An Australian physician and psychiatrist, Dr. John Diamond, found a direct link between muscle strength/weakness and music. He discovered that all of the muscles in the entire body go weak when subjected to the “stopped anapestic beat” of music from hard rock musicians, including Led Zeppelin, Alice Cooper, Queen, The Doors, Janis Joplin, Bachman – Turner Overdrive, and The Band. Dr. Diamond found another effect of the anapestic beat. He called it a “switching” of the brain. Dr. Diamond said this switching occurs when the actual symmetry between both of the cerebral hemispheres is destroyed causing alarm in the body along with lessened work performance, learning and behavior problems in children, and a “general malaise in adults.” In addition to harmful, irregular beats in rock music, shrill frequencies prove to also be harmful to the body. Bob Larson, a Christian minister and former rock musician, remembers that in the 70′s teens would bring raw eggs to a rock concert and put them on the front of the stage. The eggs would be hard boiled by the music before the end of the concert and could be eaten. Dr. Earl W. Flosdorf and Dr. Leslie A. Chambers showed that proteins in a liquid medium were coagulated when subjected to piercing high-pitched sounds

I hope you can be brave enough to close that door shut by making the commitment today that music will no longer be a part of your life and that you will not be enslaved by its lure.

Wassalam

http://enlight.ahlul...addictive-drug/

Salam-OH MY GOSH! Thats totally SCAREY! Im a recent revert/convert-I spent from age 16 all the way to 32 listening to only Alice Cooper...Yikes! What damage have I done?! No wonder Im SO terrible at math :/

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Wa / Salam,

Looks like I'm not the only one here.

Quitting music is a tough thing for sure, I have tried it umpteenth number of times and flunked but then something happened and life was not the same.(sounds quite filmy, eh?) I realized the nothingness, meaninglessness of this life. I feel like cursing myself for not spending that time I devoted to music with my 6 month old baby...Had I known, that after some days, my son would be in the bosoms of earth, all alone, in utmost darkness surrounded by crawling insects, with no oxygen and readying himself for his journey to meet his and my Lord...I would've stopped breathing, forget listening to music!

Today I hate music so much that I look at my father (who I love more than myself) with disgust when he listens to music, I get nightmares that I have started listening to music once again n when I wake up, I'm like ,"thank God, it was a dream"...Literally!!!

The period of mourning for Imam Hussain (A.S) is getting over and I feel the worst..I am in much love with the purity of my heart that was brought about by the remembrance of my Rabb and His faithful servants!

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The problem with this, is that it applies to more things than music.

We spend all our time in frivolity. Does giving up music addiction, change that?

Music addiction, as bad as it is -- and I have experience with this -- is it worse than say, footie, or video games (things that are universally accepted as mubah)? Think about it: you don't need to go to some sort of fasad hut to listen to music. You just need a machine, called a computer, connected to another machine, called a modem. And then voila, you have music.

I have personally experienced how much frivolity gets drilled into your head from listening to it. There's so many damn rap lyrics stuck in my head. They will never leave me. That's useless information: "Execution double niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiine style, fin to go send that body underground" is useless information. "I didn't wanna take his life, but the n***a tried to run and get away with me yaaaaaaaayooooooooo" is useless information. "East 99 is where you find me slangin that llello (Cleeeeeeeeeeeeeveland) Cleveland is the city where we come from so run ruuuuuuuuuun" is useless information. And not only that, but it's unakhlaqi things. Not the type of stuff that you want stuck in your head. Nobody can deny this.

But guess what? This is the key characteristic of the machine age: you can listen to that rubbish, whilst doing other stuff. So although it subverts your mind, it doesn't occupy much of your time! Meanwhile, sport and video games, occupy quite a bit of time. And in fact, one is more emotionally invested in these things than in music, because one's whole mood can alter based on the outcome of these games (whether real or virtual). Have you ever gotten upset because a song didn't end the way you wanted it to? But for example, if Iran doesn't make the world cup, I go nuts. Is that a proper approach to what is essentially a game?

So that's the issue. We have a very imbalanced approach to frivolity, where we accept some and don't accept others. And it's completely arbitrary.

Baradar out

Yes. This is very much to the point. We have to remember that the ahadith that speak about a problem with music tie to a tafsir of a Quranic verse about avoiding vain pursuits. The message is not simply to avoid a lot of what is called music. The Quranic verse spoke about a broader rule. The verse is not about music; music is just one thing that can fall under the principle of not wasting time.

Edited by kadhim

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Yes. This is very much to the point. We have to remember that the ahadith that speak about a problem with music tie to a tafsir of a Quranic verse about avoiding vain pursuits. The message is not simply to avoid a lot of what is called music. The Quranic verse spoke about a broader rule. The verse is not about music; music is just one things that falls under the principle of not wasting time.

What if I'm earning a living working as a store supervisor; manning the cash register, stacking shelves, receiving deliveries etc and i'm listening to music at the same time. How would this count as time wasting?

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What if I'm earning a living working as a store supervisor; manning the cash register, stacking shelves, receiving deliveries etc and i'm listening to music at the same time. How would this count as time wasting?

Because of that time you can waste it for Allah (SWT) sake. You can be aware of Allah while doing your job, but listening music can interrupt it.

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What if I'm earning a living working as a store supervisor; manning the cash register, stacking shelves, receiving deliveries etc and i'm listening to music at the same time. How would this count as time wasting?

You very much missed the point.

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The problem with this, is that it applies to more things than music.

We spend all our time in frivolity. Does giving up music addiction, change that?

Music addiction, as bad as it is -- and I have experience with this -- is it worse than say, footie, or video games (things that are universally accepted as mubah)? Think about it: you don't need to go to some sort of fasad hut to listen to music. You just need a machine, called a computer, connected to another machine, called a modem. And then voila, you have music.

I have personally experienced how much frivolity gets drilled into your head from listening to it. There's so many damn rap lyrics stuck in my head. They will never leave me. That's useless information: "Execution double niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiine style, fin to go send that body underground" is useless information. "I didn't wanna take his life, but the n***a tried to run and get away with me yaaaaaaaayooooooooo" is useless information. "East 99 is where you find me slangin that llello (Cleeeeeeeeeeeeeveland) Cleveland is the city where we come from so run ruuuuuuuuuun" is useless information. And not only that, but it's unakhlaqi things. Not the type of stuff that you want stuck in your head. Nobody can deny this.

But guess what? This is the key characteristic of the machine age: you can listen to that rubbish, whilst doing other stuff. So although it subverts your mind, it doesn't occupy much of your time! Meanwhile, sport and video games, occupy quite a bit of time. And in fact, one is more emotionally invested in these things than in music, because one's whole mood can alter based on the outcome of these games (whether real or virtual). Have you ever gotten upset because a song didn't end the way you wanted it to? But for example, if Iran doesn't make the world cup, I go nuts. Is that a proper approach to what is essentially a game?

So that's the issue. We have a very imbalanced approach to frivolity, where we accept some and don't accept others. And it's completely arbitrary.

Baradar out

I think this is a sign that although watching football and playing video games may be mubah, someone with some intelligence and honesty will realise that it is not something worth wasting time on. I find it particularly hard to understand how a Muslim can be full-out addicted to football or video games, and not think there is a problem with that. There is something wrong when a person's emotions are so strongly tied up in how well a group of men do in kicking a ball around a patch of grass.

I actually used to play chess a lot. I guess you could say I was addicted to it. When I became convinced it was haram, or at least not worth taking a risk on, I had to give it up. I know first hand how dangerous it is as a game if you play it seriously, and for the same reasons I would avoid any other games that have similar characteristics, despite the fact that they may not be proven to be haram.

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Because of that time you can waste it for Allah (SWT) sake. You can be aware of Allah while doing your job, but listening music can interrupt it.

It all comes down to the type of music you listen to, otherwise it's not really wasting time. I don't think music can distract you from being wary of the higher power, working in itself can distract you from God.

You very much missed the point.

No, I very much got the point. I'm trying to be objective about it.

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Letting go of music is not an easy task, especially if you were brought up in a Muslim household that taught you very little about Islam. Music is not only the norm throughout the world, it is the rule. Growing up in the West you meet your friends based on the genre of music in which you listen. From a logical perspective, you've already concluded that music is haram and ought to be avoided. This is a good first step. Now, we must use that knowledge to drive your faith and your practice. What is faith without knowledge?

I highly recommend that you preoccupy yourself with media, especially at night. Listen to lectures, debates and newscasts. They don't all have to be Muslim. I have a plethora of political, social and economic interests. Late at night I cultivate these interests, whether through Youtube or reading.

There came a time when I would only listen to music to drown out other sounds around me. Al-Hamdullilah, finishing school and finding a great job has given me practically no time to look for useless jingles. I guarantee you, once you have your own place and have the opportunity to control your surroundings, this part of your life will improve.

I can't tell you how many lyrics I have in my head of songs I used to listen to years ago. And not just any old songs; I had a very nuanced and well developed taste for music. Progressive Rock/Metal, Melodic Death Metal and bands from every corner of the earth. My uncle is a well-known Lebanese singer. I spent thousands of dollars on CDs growing up. Yet, even I was able to do away with it. Then again, I was raised in a household that did not teach me how to pray, so I had to learn salat on my own. Suffice it to say, abstaining from music was the least of my worries at one point. Faith comes with knowledge and the pursuit of knowledge will get you closer to God. The more you know, the more you will put into practice. This will come gradually. Work toward building your life in every capacity and this tendency will evaporate.

Edited by asphyxiated

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It all comes down to the type of music you listen to, otherwise it's not really wasting time. I don't think music can distract you from being wary of the higher power, working in itself can distract you from God.

Brother, yes it depends on individual. The whole point is that Music can be used as an vain pursuit, disrupting rememberence of God. And the consicouness is following;

[Shakir 43:36] And whoever turns himself away from the remembrance of the Beneficent Allah, We appoint for him a Shaitan, so he becomes his associate.

[Shakir 43:37] And most surely they turn them away from the path, and they think that they are guided aright:

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Knowledge... Once you understand what music is and what affect it has on you it wont be so hard to let go.

Plus when I stopped listening to music, I didn't make myself stop. It was gradual till I stopped just kinda stopped.

Now even when there is music in the room I'm in, it doesn't bother me much. It's there but it's no where near me.

Oh and I also noticed that my mind was so much clearer after I stopped

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