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Egypts New Look Parliament.... Lol :)

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:lol: :lol: :lol:

http://www.reuters.c...E80N1D520120124

(Reuters) - Egypt's parliament will hold its own inquiry into violence during the uprising against Hosni Mubarak, the speaker said on Tuesday during a session that served notice that the army-led government will face close scrutiny from newly elected MPs.

Elected in Egypt's most democratic election in six decades, the Islamist-dominated lower house discussed on its second day of business ways to secure justice for the victims of violence during the uprising that unseated Mubarak.

It is a main demand of activists who have called for mass protests on Wednesday, hoping to use the first anniversary of the uprising against Mubarak to rally opposition to military rulers they say are obstructing real democratic reform.

In an apparent gesture to the reform movement, the military council said on Tuesday it would lift a state of emergency in place since 1981, though left in place a clause which meant its laws would still apply in some cases of "thuggery," without spelling out what that meant.

Heba Morayef, the Egypt researcher for New-York based Human Rights Watch, described it as "misleading," saying the exception to the law left wide scope for arbitrary detention.

Washington, which had hinted it could review its $1.3 billion in annual military aid after criticizing Egypt's raids on pro-democracy groups and violence against protesters, welcomed it as a "good step," but sought "clarification" about the exception.

Asked by reporters whether the emergency law's removal might be more cosmetic than substantive, State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said: "That is why we are going in to the Egyptians and asking for their clarity on this point and urging them to be absolutely clear with the Egyptian people."

"WE WANT REAL JUSTICE"

The military council will exercise Mubarak's presidential powers until the end of June, when, according to their own timetable, they will hand authority to an elected president.

In parliament, one lawmaker after another echoed the demand for an independent fact-finding committee into violence which killed around 800 people. No senior official has been found responsible for the violence.

Akram al-Sha'ir, whose son was injured in the protests, broke into tears during a passionate speech to the chamber now dominated by members of his Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), the party of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood.

"Mr. Speaker, it's been a year, where is the verdict? Tardy justice is oppression," he said.

"We want real justice," he said, to a standing ovation.

FJP secretary-general, Saad el-Katatni, who was elected speaker of the parliament on Monday, said: "The chamber will form a fact-finding committee after these discussions."

However, MPs wrangled into the night over who should be on the committee, as well as over the composition of other parliamentary sub-committees charged with overseeing everything from defense to health care.

Elections to decide who should sit on the committees were postponed when smaller parties withdrew in protest at what they said were FPJ attempts at domination.

The Brotherhood won nearly half the seats in the election that began in November and drew to a close this month, an outcome unthinkable just a year ago when the group was still formally outlawed by the Mubarak administration and parliament was no more than a rubber stamp for his decisions.

Mubarak is now standing trial, facing charges including ordering the killing of protesters during the 18-day uprising that ended when he handed power to the military leadership on February 11. But the prosecution has said a lack of cooperation from security authorities has hindered evidence gathering.

That charge - denied by the authorities - has strengthened the view of those Egyptians who worry that much of the Mubarak-era establishment is still in place and blocking reform.

One MP criticized Kamal al-Ganzouri, the prime minister, for failing to attend the session, saying his absence was reminiscent of the Mubarak days.

"AN OCCASION FOR UNITY"

Ganzouri, who served as a prime minister under Mubarak, was appointed by the military council in November. The FJP has signaled it will work with his administration for what remains of the transitional period.

With few representatives in parliament, the loose coalition of pro-democracy groups aim to increase pressure on the military council on Wednesday with mass protests they hope will recreate the uprising of last year.

The youth activist movement has grown ever more suspicious of the military council since it took power, accusing the generals of seeking to hold on to power and privilege.

The military council headed by Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi has called for a day of celebration, not protests.

"The January 25 anniversary will remain an occasion for unity among the people and the armed forces, which stood by their side," Tantawi said in a televised address.

He described the election of parliament as the "first important step along the road of democratic change" before announcing the partial end to the state of emergency - long a demand of the reform movement.

In another apparent move to deflect criticism ahead of the anniversary, the council last week pardoned nearly 2,000 people convicted in military courts since Mubarak was toppled.

(Additional reporting by Tamim Elyan; Dina Zayed and Ahmed Tolba; Writing by Tom Perry; Editing by Alison Williams)

Edited by south-lebanon
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partido-ultra-conservador-sessao-aprlamento-egito-20120123-size-598.jpg

:lol: :lol: :lol:

http://www.reuters.c...E80N1D520120124

(Reuters) - Egypt's parliament will hold its own inquiry into violence during the uprising against Hosni Mubarak, the speaker said on Tuesday during a session that served notice that the army-led government will face close scrutiny from newly elected MPs.

Elected in Egypt's most democratic election in six decades, the Islamist-dominated lower house discussed on its second day of business ways to secure justice for the victims of violence during the uprising that unseated Mubarak.

It is a main demand of activists who have called for mass protests on Wednesday, hoping to use the first anniversary of the uprising against Mubarak to rally opposition to military rulers they say are obstructing real democratic reform.

In an apparent gesture to the reform movement, the military council said on Tuesday it would lift a state of emergency in place since 1981, though left in place a clause which meant its laws would still apply in some cases of "thuggery," without spelling out what that meant.

Heba Morayef, the Egypt researcher for New-York based Human Rights Watch, described it as "misleading," saying the exception to the law left wide scope for arbitrary detention.

Washington, which had hinted it could review its $1.3 billion in annual military aid after criticizing Egypt's raids on pro-democracy groups and violence against protesters, welcomed it as a "good step," but sought "clarification" about the exception.

Asked by reporters whether the emergency law's removal might be more cosmetic than substantive, State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said: "That is why we are going in to the Egyptians and asking for their clarity on this point and urging them to be absolutely clear with the Egyptian people."

"WE WANT REAL JUSTICE"

The military council will exercise Mubarak's presidential powers until the end of June, when, according to their own timetable, they will hand authority to an elected president.

In parliament, one lawmaker after another echoed the demand for an independent fact-finding committee into violence which killed around 800 people. No senior official has been found responsible for the violence.

Akram al-Sha'ir, whose son was injured in the protests, broke into tears during a passionate speech to the chamber now dominated by members of his Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), the party of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood.

"Mr. Speaker, it's been a year, where is the verdict? Tardy justice is oppression," he said.

"We want real justice," he said, to a standing ovation.

FJP secretary-general, Saad el-Katatni, who was elected speaker of the parliament on Monday, said: "The chamber will form a fact-finding committee after these discussions."

However, MPs wrangled into the night over who should be on the committee, as well as over the composition of other parliamentary sub-committees charged with overseeing everything from defense to health care.

Elections to decide who should sit on the committees were postponed when smaller parties withdrew in protest at what they said were FPJ attempts at domination.

The Brotherhood won nearly half the seats in the election that began in November and drew to a close this month, an outcome unthinkable just a year ago when the group was still formally outlawed by the Mubarak administration and parliament was no more than a rubber stamp for his decisions.

Mubarak is now standing trial, facing charges including ordering the killing of protesters during the 18-day uprising that ended when he handed power to the military leadership on February 11. But the prosecution has said a lack of cooperation from security authorities has hindered evidence gathering.

That charge - denied by the authorities - has strengthened the view of those Egyptians who worry that much of the Mubarak-era establishment is still in place and blocking reform.

One MP criticized Kamal al-Ganzouri, the prime minister, for failing to attend the session, saying his absence was reminiscent of the Mubarak days.

"AN OCCASION FOR UNITY"

Ganzouri, who served as a prime minister under Mubarak, was appointed by the military council in November. The FJP has signaled it will work with his administration for what remains of the transitional period.

With few representatives in parliament, the loose coalition of pro-democracy groups aim to increase pressure on the military council on Wednesday with mass protests they hope will recreate the uprising of last year.

The youth activist movement has grown ever more suspicious of the military council since it took power, accusing the generals of seeking to hold on to power and privilege.

The military council headed by Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi has called for a day of celebration, not protests.

"The January 25 anniversary will remain an occasion for unity among the people and the armed forces, which stood by their side," Tantawi said in a televised address.

He described the election of parliament as the "first important step along the road of democratic change" before announcing the partial end to the state of emergency - long a demand of the reform movement.

In another apparent move to deflect criticism ahead of the anniversary, the council last week pardoned nearly 2,000 people convicted in military courts since Mubarak was toppled.

(Additional reporting by Tamim Elyan; Dina Zayed and Ahmed Tolba; Writing by Tom Perry; Editing by Alison Williams)

HOLY SWEET MOTHER OF JESUS CHRIST!!!! :blink:

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The Wahabi lobbies will probably opt to tear them down as the work of mushriks. :no:

This really sucks.

It seems the future existance of the pyramids are already being debated:

Protesting Egypt tour guides fear Islamist rise

Around 1,000 Egyptians rallied near the ancient pyramids on Friday to protest against what they said were threats by Islamic radicals to undermine tourism, one of the country's biggest money earners.

Islamist groups look set to dominate the next parliament, with the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood seeing its party win 37 percent of the vote in a first phase of balloting and the much more puritanical Salafis securing a surprise 24 percent.

The spectacular rise of the Salafist al-Nour party has sent a shiver through more secular Egyptians, who fear the newly empowered group might try to impose its views on society.

Heightening their anxieties, one prominent Salafi spokesman has suggested covering up ancient Egyptian statues, such as the Sphinx that guards the pyramids, saying they may be idolatrous.

He was later disavowed by other al-Nour members. But tour guides say an Islamist victory could deter tourists from coming to Egypt, which has already seen a sharp fall-off in visitors since the ousting of president Hosni Mubarak in February.

"Islamist individuals who see the world in black and white are a real danger to this country," said Khaled Touni, 35, a guide who studied Egyptology, Islamic and Coptic history.

"We demand that each party, whether Islamist or mainstream, announce what is its program for enhancing tourism before parliament convenes," he added.

Anger was directed at Abdel Moneim el-Shahat, who is highly popular among Egypt's Salafis and who has questioned the moral integrity of priceless ancient statues that dot the country.

Shahat, who failed to win a seat in an electoral run off this week, denied the statues should be smashed, but suggested they could be covered with wax. "People would be able to see through wax," he told Dream Television.

His comments aroused painful memories of Afghanistan's hardline Taliban, which blew up two monumental Buddha statues in Bamiyan in 2001, arguing the pre-Islamic art was idolatrous.

There have also been suggestions that an Islamist government in Egypt might ban alcohol sales and outlaw mixed bathing and bikinis in the country's popular resorts, like Sharm el-Sheikh on the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula.

Tourism is Egypt's top foreign currency earner, accounting for over a tenth of gross domestic product and employing an estimated one in eight of the workforce.

However, the number of tourists visiting Egypt dropped by more than a third in the second quarter of 2011 compared to last year and the protesting tour guides fear the crowds will stay away while uncertainty lingers.

"Not all the Islamist currents are to blame, but some individuals, like el Shahat among others, have said ridiculous things," said Hassan Nahla, a tour guide for 11 years.

"The point of the revolution is to improve every sector and every aspect of Egyptian society, including tourism... Tourism can be developed. But these people are speaking about destroying it," he added.

Most of Parliament is now either dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood or Salafist Nour, and no doubt the two will work together. All wolves in sheep's clothing.

The wahabi party " Al Nour" is all but an extension on Saudi Arabia.... and they amazeingly recieved 25% of the entire vote

There are rumours that Saudi Arabia sent billions and billions of dollars to bribe poor Egyptians to vote for them.

So much so, for the much talked about mend in Egyptian-Iranian relatiions ...and camp David is strong as ever.

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Organizations like the Salafis and the MB will be more concerned about things like whether women are driving or not or whether Shia should be considered Muslim or not or about removing bells from Coptic churches because a Sunni hadith says Caliph Omar told everyone the Prophet said there were devils in them. They'll focus on these things rather than improving Egypt's economic infrastructure, housing, or education, just watch. I don't know why Muslims still so blindly follow these groups. Haven't the past like 30 years of experience with them taught us anything?

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Organizations like the Salafis and the MB will be more concerned about things like whether women are driving or not or whether Shia should be considered Muslim or not or about removing bells from Coptic churches because a Sunni hadith says Caliph Omar told everyone the Prophet said there were devils in them. They'll focus on these things rather than improving Egypt's economic infrastructure, housing, or education, just watch. I don't know why Muslims still so blindly follow these groups. Haven't the past like 30 years of experience with them taught us anything?

Democracy in the mideast is a all lies!!

Saudi Arabia spent billions bribeing the Lebanese elections, i personally know Lebanese sunnis from Australia whose parents were flown to Lebanon for free and paid 500$ each to vote for Saad Hariri the Saudi stooge. Everyone who voted for Saad Hariri recieved that $500t, but in Lebanon noone other than sunnis and a few foolish others voted for him because Lebanese understand that a decision like that could mean the difference between life and death.

Egypts population is alot poorer and not as ethnically diverse as Lebanon, and not as experienced in wahabi meddling, so i imagine it would be alot easier to bribe them.

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The only Islamist party that, thus far at least, that seems to be moderate and willing to cooperate with other parties is probably Tunisia's Ennahda party. I don't trust the Muslim Brotherhood at all really.

Edited by Saintly_Jinn23
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The only Islamist party that, thus far at least, that seems to be moderate and willing to cooperate with other parties is probably Tunisia's Ennahda party. I don't trust the Muslim Brotherhood at all really.

The next few days will be very intresting on how they act, Its comeing up to the aniversary of the overthrow of Mubarak and activists are setting up for another massive round of protests to topple the millitary installed government. How the muslim Brotherhood act on this, since they boycotted the last ones in November but given now they have the power they were after, will determine alot about their character and which derection they will go, until now evryones been speculating about their intentions and what direction they will go, the next few days will probably give us a deffinate idea.

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I don't understand why they wear western clothes? Iranian politican-clerics always wear Islamic clothes and a turban, and have sensible "Muhammadi" beards, not Jewish beards.

its funny how they don't see the contridiction in growing their beard uncontrolably according to their sunnah but then they go ahead and wear english ties, I remeber hamas used to wear ties in the early 2000's and then all the sudden stopped wearing them obviously it was due to the influence from Iran.

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