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Noah-

Al- Mutlak And Al- Hashimi Gangs Attack Baghdad

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They are backed by GCC, especially the govrnment of Saudi.

These fugitives should be arrested and punished. No one can proof himself through bombings and assassinations. Maliki's government needs to react strongly or else Sadr will strike and will strike hard.

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Dozens killed in Baghdad blasts

A series of bomb blasts across Iraqi capital leaves dozens dead and many more injured amid rising sectarian tensions.

Dozens of people have been killed and many more wounded in a series of blasts in Baghdad.

At least 63 people died and 176 people were wounded in 12 bombings across the Iraqi capital on Thursday morning, health ministry sources told Al Jazeera.

The wave of bombings come amid renewed fears of sectarian strife following the withdrawal of US troops and a deepening political crisis over an arrest warrant issued for Tariq al-Hashimi, the country's vice president and most senior Sunni politician.

The attacks largely coincided with the morning rush hour, and security forces cordoned off bomb sites, AFP news agency correspondents and officials said.

Authorities believe the attacks were well co-ordinated, Al Jazeera's Omar al-Saleh said, reporting from Baghdad.

"We don't know who carried out the attacks, the Iraqi security officials did not identify any suspects yet," Saleh said, adding: "This I think is a major setback to the security forces on the ground who have a large presence in the capital. You have checkpoints, you have roadsblocks, and you have both the military and the Iraqi police guarding different areas, yet these attacks do occur."

Iraqi officials said the bombs struck in the Allawi, Bab al-Muatham and Karrada districts of central Baghdad, the Adhamiyah, Shuala and Shaab neighbourhoods in the north, Jadriyah in the east, Ghazaliyah in the west and al-Amil and Dura in the south.

Planned and coordinated

Will Geddes, a security specialist with International Corporate Protection, told Al Jazeera that "a number of potential motivations behind the attacks: It could be some means to destabilise the government and its credibility".

"It is probably the worst co-ordinated attacks we have see in a significant period of time. The attacks were very planned and coordinated and would have required lot of resources.

Aljazeera

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Guest EndlessEndeavor

A clear and direct response to the arrest warrant issued for Al-hashemi.

These sick dogs need to be arrested as soon as possible. They are well-organised and funded by big powers within the Government and the Arab world. I am glad Maliki has remained strong in his resolve despite the propaganda war being waged against in an attempt to create more sectarian conflict.

Lets hope the Shia wise up and stop voting for that scum Allawi and his terrorist party Iraqiya.

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Guest Zahratul_Islam

A clear and direct response to the arrest warrant issued for Al-hashemi.

These sick dogs need to be arrested as soon as possible. They are well-organised and funded by big powers within the Government and the Arab world. I am glad Maliki has remained strong in his resolve despite the propaganda war being waged against in an attempt to create more sectarian conflict.

Lets hope the Shia wise up and stop voting for that scum Allawi and his terrorist party Iraqiya.

Agreed. I just do not understand why the Kurds are currently harboring him and what their motivations might be at this point. Maliki has made it quite clear that it would be a criminal offense not to turn him over now that the warrant has been issued by the judiciary. How is this going to help them in the long run?

Hashemi hates them.

Maliki has a lot riding on this, if he can't manage to bring Hashemi (a well known terrorist) to trial then he will have a lot of trouble remaining in power. As much as I have criticized Maliki and the sycophants that surround him, I think he is an excellent politician and the type of strategic leader that we need. Right now he has the green light to take them out and I am very glad he is taking advantage of the circumstances. America was too nice to these baathi klab safala throughout the duration of their stay.

Maybe an attack like this will get people to protest against protecting Hashemi? Create a greater public outcry to pressure those in power?

Inna lilah wa inna ilayhi raji'oon. Such devastating news to absorb.

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"Ayad Allawi, who heads a Sunni-backed party called Iraqiya, laid the blame for Thursday's violence with the government. The Iraqiya coalition also includes Hashimi and Mutlaq, and Allawi has been one of Maliki's strongest critics. Allawi warned that violence would continue as long as people are left out of the political process."

"We have warned long ago that terrorism will continue against the Iraqi people unless the political landscape is corrected and the political process is corrected, and it becomes an inclusive political process and full-blown non-sectarian institutions will be built in Iraq," Allawi told the Associated Press, speaking from neighbouring Beirut.

http://www.guardian....mb-attacks-iraq

Basically code for "we won't stop slaughtering innocents until you give us all the power we enjoyed under baba Saddam."

Edited by Zahratul_Islam

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Please stop making this out to be sectarian. Many Sunni neighborhoods have been targetted as well. Never really like Allawi the Quisling and his boys and can't wait to see them hanged, but this has footprints of the Quds Force all over, in a desperate attempt at inflaming sectarian chaos and another excuse for a sectarian holocaust against Sunnis.

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Guest Zahratul_Islam

I don't have access to the channels I usually get when I am with the fam. Does anyone know where I can get up to date information on these events? A website that streams Iraqi news?

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Agreed. I just do not understand why the Kurds are currently harboring him and what their motivations might be at this point. Maliki has made it quite clear that it would be a criminal offense not to turn him over now that the warrant has been issued by the judiciary. How is this going to help them in the long run?

As the saying goes, be careful what you wish for. maliki and his mentors in Iran desperately wanted to sectarianize Iraq, which was had a beautiful, secular, syncretic culture. they wanted to sectarianize it and make it another Lebanon which they can rule with their little toe. They tried to do a genocide against Sunnis. I'm afraid they have suceeded in sectarianizing the country. Do not forget that most Kurds are at the end of the day, Sunnis, even if nominally and culturally. Nouri al Irani has nobody but himself to blame if the Kurds have suddenly become aware of their Sunni-ness.

Maliki has a lot riding on this, if he can't manage to bring Hashemi (a well known terrorist) to trial then he will have a lot of trouble remaining in power. As much as I have criticized Maliki and the sycophants that surround him, I think he is an excellent politician and the type of strategic leader that we need. Right now he has the green light to take them out and I am very glad he is taking advantage of the circumstances. America was too nice to these baathi klab safala throughout the duration of their stay.

Baathi ? Hashemi is a stupid "moderate Islamist" like the Muslim brotherhood of Egypt, he with hs stupid ideals opposed the Baath regime since 1963. There is an arraest warrant against him since Saddam's time ( just like there is a death sentence against Nouri al irani since 1982 ). The guy is a stupid "moderate Islmaist" and don't insult Al baath by associating him with them. However, at least the dimwit is realizing his folly in opposing Saddam for all these years, hopefully he and others like him see the light before its too late for Iraq.

Saleh al Mutlak is another clueless liberal who left the Baath in 1976, I wonder whats Maliki's beef with him.

Maybe an attack like this will get people to protest against protecting Hashemi? Create a greater public outcry to pressure those in power?

Maybe an attack like this will get people mad again, neigbours killing each other, create a better situation for Iran and KSA to do their dirty work in Iraq.

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Allawi warned that violence would continue as long as people are left out of the political process."

"We have warned long ago that terrorism will continue against the Iraqi people unless the political landscape is corrected and the political process is corrected, and it becomes an inclusive political process and full-blown non-sectarian institutions will be built in Iraq," Allawi told the Associated Press, speaking from neighbouring Beirut.

http://www.guardian....mb-attacks-iraq

Basically code for "we won't stop slaughtering innocents until you give us all the power we enjoyed under baba Saddam."

Allawi clearly says that, he supports terrorism until he gets some kinds of powers. This monafiq should understand one thing that those days are gone where Baathist dogs and foreign agents could rule through different means. Hashimi might get some protection from Zionist in Turkish area, but he can't hide forever. Allawi should reconsider his methods for power, else he might be blown into 100 pieces himself.

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Please stop making this out to be sectarian. Many Sunni neighborhoods have been targetted as well. Never really like Allawi the Quisling and his boys and can't wait to see them hanged, but this has footprints of the Quds Force all over, in a desperate attempt at inflaming sectarian chaos and another excuse for a sectarian holocaust against Sunnis.

LOL, tell that to the people planting the bombs you maniac!

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Guest Zahratul_Islam

Please stop making this out to be sectarian. Many Sunni neighborhoods have been targetted as well. Never really like Allawi the Quisling and his boys and can't wait to see them hanged, but this has footprints of the Quds Force all over, in a desperate attempt at inflaming sectarian chaos and another excuse for a sectarian holocaust against Sunnis.

The vast majority of the victims were Shia.. but that isn't the only thing indicating the sectarian nature of this. The Quds force is certainly not the group quoted as saying that the Iraqi government can expect more acts like this if they do not change things up.

You know who is saying that though? Allawi and Co.

So how the flipping fudge did you manage to make this about Iran? Is there any substance there beyond your pan Arab loyalties and your sectarian grievances?

Baathi ? Hashemi is a stupid "moderate Islamist" like the Muslim brotherhood of Egypt, he with hs stupid ideals opposed the Baath regime since 1963. There is an arraest warrant against him since Saddam's time ( just like there is a death sentence against Nouri al irani since 1982 ). The guy is a stupid "moderate Islmaist" and don't insult Al baath by associating him with them. However, at least the dimwit is realizing his folly in opposing Saddam for all these years, hopefully he and others like him see the light before its too late for Iraq.

Saleh al Mutlak is another clueless liberal who left the Baath in 1976, I wonder whats Maliki's beef with him.

I don't care, as of right now, given the company he keeps and the goals he has, he is nothing more than a baathi sympathizer and apologist.

There is nothing moderate about them, and it is about time Maliki stopped covering for them and started making an example of them instead.

I totally understand where you are coming from though. You are someone who believes that it is perfectly acceptable to worship/admire a human being who literally sold the blood of his people for the interests of others and who was complicit in the rape/tortures/ethnic cleaning of so many Iraqis.. so I completely get why someone with your warped mentality would think the likes of Hashemi or Mutlaq are merely "moderate" Islamists or "liberals."

They simply don't have quite enough blood on their hands to earn your respect.. yet. At least you are giving them credit for slowly getting there..

Ever so gracious of you :rolleyes:

As the saying goes, be careful what you wish for. maliki and his mentors in Iran desperately wanted to sectarianize Iraq, which was had a beautiful, secular, syncretic culture. they wanted to sectarianize it and make it another Lebanon which they can rule with their little toe. They tried to do a genocide against Sunnis. I'm afraid they have suceeded in sectarianizing the country. Do not forget that most Kurds are at the end of the day, Sunnis, even if nominally and culturally. Nouri al Irani has nobody but himself to blame if the Kurds have suddenly become aware of their Sunni-ness.

Yes, Iraq was a BEAUTIFUL country before all of this happened. Unless you happened to live in the devastated provinces south of Baghdad or happened to be a Kurd. Then it kind of sucked SUPER badly for you. But hey, provided you were a Sunni Arab (or a Shia/Kurd with no self worth) it was all sh!ts and giggles.

And your analysis of the situation is ridiculous. You think the Kurds are suddenly aware of their "Sunni-ness"? Rofl.

This is nothing more than a petty card to hold against Maliki in Baghdad, nothing more than power politics.

As for the nonsense about Iran, it is nothing more than the typical propaganda that comes from racist pan-Arabists who would put their racial prejudice above the interests of their country.. ala Saddam al kalb. As soon as you called him "Noori al Irani" I realized it would be a waste of time replying to you.. but the Kurd and the Southern Iraqi Shia in me couldn't help herself.

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This is fascinating the Americans leave and Iraq behaves like in was 2004 or 5. No political maturity there straight to sectarian violence and here at SC the usual characters believe whatever their favorites say without any information.

I don’t know if the accusations against Hashemi are true or not but why wasn’t he arrested a year ago. Furthermore why aren’t these charges coming from the police or any unbiased prosecutor? We know why that is don’t we, it’s because there is not one unbiased person in the entire government structure. It is a crippled and retarded process and government when decisions are determined by sectarianism.

There is no better example of history repeating itself than right now in Iraq, and it happens every time religion is involved in politics. I don’t like it will ever change in that part of the world and it’s a damned shame. The best position to take is to assume that all of the prominent and influential players in Iraq are filthy with blood on their hands from sectarian violence. There is little doubt in my mind that Saddam should have been left on power.

So what happens now does AQ and a Sunni Mujahedin come pouring in? If this does happen I hope they call on Iran to save their bacon and not the US. The Iraqi army will not do the job and the Sunnis will leave it to join their own death squads.

Here’s hoping none of this happens but it doesn’t look good.

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There is little doubt in my mind that Saddam should have been left on power.

Given this statement.. nothing else you said is worth reading :rolleyes:

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This is fascinating the Americans leave and Iraq behaves like in was 2004 or 5. No political maturity there straight to sectarian violence and here at SC the usual characters believe whatever their favorites say without any information.

I don’t know if the accusations against Hashemi are true or not but why wasn’t he arrested a year ago. Furthermore why aren’t these charges coming from the police or any unbiased prosecutor? We know why that is don’t we, it’s because there is not one unbiased person in the entire government structure. It is a crippled and retarded process and government when decisions are determined by sectarianism.

There is no better example of history repeating itself than right now in Iraq, and it happens every time religion is involved in politics. I don’t like it will ever change in that part of the world and it’s a damned shame. The best position to take is to assume that all of the prominent and influential players in Iraq are filthy with blood on their hands from sectarian violence. There is little doubt in my mind that Saddam should have been left on power.

So what happens now does AQ and a Sunni Mujahedin come pouring in? If this does happen I hope they call on Iran to save their bacon and not the US. The Iraqi army will not do the job and the Sunnis will leave it to join their own death squads.

Here’s hoping none of this happens but it doesn’t look good.

1) The best position to take is to assume that all of the prominent and influential players in Iraq are filthy with blood on their hands from sectarian violence.

2) So, the most sectarian, most bloody ruler Iraq has ever had is better than Al-Maliki? That's taking it way too far mate. All Maliki has done is charge a politician with terrorism (and let's face it, he's probably one of many guilty of this). Saddam committed genocide against hundreds of thousands. No comparison.

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Aarash it is great to hear from you and I hope you are well.

Saddam was much more a meglamaniac than a sectarian and he was not a devout Muslim but he was an Arab and a Baathist, all what Shias are not. My point is that alot more Iraqi,s would be alive today if Saddam were still in power.

You see nothing suspicious about Maliki's timing. How did this dude become vice-president. Do you not believe that the situation is going to escalate? Maliki is removing Sunnis from government and they will become the Shia of the nineties. As I said no political maturity and no lesson's learned from history but to repeat it.

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Aarash it is great to hear from you and I hope you are well.

Saddam was much more a meglamaniac than a sectarian and he was not a devout Muslim (1) but he was an Arab and a Baathist, all what Shias are not. My point is that alot more Iraqi,s would be alive today if Saddam were still in power. (2)

You see nothing suspicious about Maliki's timing. (3) How did this dude become vice-president. (4) Do you not believe that the situation is going to escalate? (5) Maliki is removing Sunnis from government and they will become the Shia of the nineties. (6) As I said no political maturity and no lesson's learned from history but to repeat it. (7)

Good to hear from you too satyaban, I enjoy watching you stirring the pot! ;-)

1) I know this is a common refrain but it's not quite true. He wasn't until the early 90s, and then all of a sudden he transformed himself into "The Leader of The Believers" and wrote the Qu'ran in his own blood, sponsored Jihadi/Wahhabi mullahs, etc. He was even in dialogue with Ansar al-Islam (the Jihadi/Wahhabi Kurdish group).

2) True, "if he were still in power". Still, we don't know what would have happened when he died. It's quite possible that we could have been in a similarly ugly situation, but instead of US occupation (now finished) it could be a Saudi Occupation of the Sunni triangle, Turkish occupation of Kurdistan, and Iranian Occupation of the rest. There still could have been a costly sectarian-ethnic civil war. In fact, that's the best argument the Pro-War Americans have for the massive debacle they got themselves into - that it was better that they were there instead of leaving it to Iraq's neighbours. However, I don't believe it's moral to engage in such pre-emptive war, and Bush/Blair still have a lot of blood on their hands even if you believe their intentions were sound.

3) Absolutely. This was a definite power putsch. I'm no supporter of Al-Maliki - however, out of the big Blocs/Lists, his is definitely the best.

4) The weird thing is, Hashemi is the last person who anyone would have suspected of this activity. Not his deputy Mutlaq, he is a Ba'athist fanatic through and through. But Hashemi is a surprise. But then, this is a country driven to barbarism. Law of the jungle type thing - the most ruthless [Edited Out]s are the ones who have risen to the top (both Allawi and Maliki are extremely ruthless in their own way. You should talk to people from Mosul about Allawi, that guy had no mercy for anyone).

5) I don't know. I have some family and friends in Erbil. They're quite isolated from all this trouble of course, but it's hard to see a way back for Hashemi. Best case scenario is that the evidence Maliki comes up with is so incontrovertible that the Iraqiya List accepts it, disassociates themselves from Hashemi, and moves on. Unlikely. Even if they do accept it, they'd likely support it anyway - as his supporters who bombed Shias this week testify. I think the Balkanization of Iraq has just been shifted forward.

6) That's a bit strong. There are not exactly Sunni mass graves yet. Sunnis in Diyala and Salahadin already declared "autonomy" - if worst comes to worst, they can always relocate there and create their constiutitonally guaranteed autonomous region (they could call it Ba'athistan. well, I will anyways!).

7) Very true. You would think Iraqis would have learnt by now. Seems it might take another few years and another few thousand dead bodies. :no:

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1) I know this is a common refrain but it's not quite true. He wasn't until the early 90s, and then all of a sudden he transformed himself into "The Leader of The Believers" and wrote the Qu'ran in his own blood, sponsored Jihadi/Wahhabi mullahs, etc. He was even in dialogue with Ansar al-Islam (the Jihadi/Wahhabi Kurdish group).

Got any evidence of this ? I'm sure you're talking about Mullah Krekar and his crazy group, what incentive did Saddam have in funding him, or for that matter any other Takfiri group ? The old argument that he did it to weaken the Kurdish resistance is simply not true, by that time the PUK and KDP were very well entrenched already, and anyway Saddam did not have anything to gain from weakening a moderate Kurd like Talabani. Also this old rotten argument of Saddam-funding-Wahhabis is the same one used by the Zio-Americans to

justify the invasion.

5) I don't know. I have some family and friends in Erbil. They're quite isolated from all this trouble of course, but it's hard to see a way back for Hashemi. Best case scenario is that the evidence Maliki comes up with is so incontrovertible that the Iraqiya List accepts it, disassociates themselves from Hashemi, and moves on. Unlikely. Even if they do accept it, they'd likely support it anyway - as his supporters who bombed Shias this week testify. I think the Balkanization of Iraq has just been shifted forward.

The Balkanization of Iraq started from as early as 1995, when the No-Fly-Zones were established on a purely sectarian basis. The Iraqi Air Force wass officially deprived by the UN of flying over the Kurdish and Shia regions of Iraq. Basically Iraq was stripped of its soveregnty.

6) That's a bit strong. There are not exactly Sunni mass graves yet. Sunnis in Diyala and Salahadin already declared "autonomy" - if worst comes to worst, they can always relocate there and create their constiutitonally guaranteed autonomous region (they could call it Ba'athistan. well, I will anyways!).

There are mass graves in Tal Afar in Ninawa Governorate. If you remember, on one cursed evening in 2007, car bombs planted by foreign agents went off in Shia areas.....and within an hour Sunni areas were treated to indiscriminate machine gun fire, some of the assailants were the National Police, they just rounded young men up, shot them point blank and dumped them on the street. More than 300 people died that day, from the blasts as well as from the shootings.

There are also mass graves in Adhamiyah in Baghdad.

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Guest Zahratul_Islam

Aarash it is great to hear from you and I hope you are well.

Saddam was much more a meglamaniac than a sectarian and he was not a devout Muslim but he was an Arab and a Baathist, all what Shias are not. My point is that alot more Iraqi,s would be alive today if Saddam were still in power.

You see nothing suspicious about Maliki's timing. How did this dude become vice-president. Do you not believe that the situation is going to escalate? Maliki is removing Sunnis from government and they will become the Shia of the nineties. As I said no political maturity and no lesson's learned from history but to repeat it.

Maybe if the Iraqi government cared about what a Saddam sympathizer had to say, they would allow criminals and thugs to get away with murder in order to prove their "political maturity."

If people want to partake in government freely and fairly, so be it. If people want to intimidate the political process and bully their way into more power than should be afforded to them then they will be tried accordingly.

There is nothing wrong with Sunnis in government. There is something wrong with criminals and Al Qaeda agents in government.

I advise you to learn more about the current situation or the previous regime before you chip in your two cents and start talking about pan Arabism being a better alternative to Shias partaking in the political process.

It is far easier to ignore you when you are blithering on ignorantly in the Iranian forum.

Edited by Zahratul_Islam

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Aarash:

2) True, "if he were still in power". Still, we don't know what would have happened when he died. It's quite possible that we could have been in a similarly ugly situation, but instead of US occupation (now finished) it could be a Saudi Occupation of the Sunni triangle, Turkish occupation of Kurdistan, and Iranian Occupation of the rest. There still could have been a costly sectarian-ethnic civil war. In fact, that's the best argument the Pro-War Americans have for the massive debacle they got themselves into - that it was better that they were there instead of leaving it to Iraq's neighbours. However, I don't believe it's moral to engage in such pre-emptive war, and Bush/Blair still have a lot of blood on their hands even if you believe their intentions were sound.

My point is that the U.S. misadventure in Iraq should not have happened and nothing positive came of it. So here are some positives if the U.S. had let him be.

1. Many Americans would be alive today and there would be fewer widows, widowers, and children lacking one of their parents. This also applies many times over to the Iraqis with the addition a great many less parents who lost children. It may be argued who knows maybe Iraq’s government would have changed and there would have been a bloodbath anyway, to that I would say at least someone else’s hands would be bloody and not America’s. Furthermore America’s standing in the society of nations would be a bit higher.

2. America would not have thrown so much money down the drain. I say this because Iraq appears to be rapidly going back to its old ways and the only change is the cast of characters. Maliki is moving to remove his rivals such as Hashemi with charges he ran a murder squad. I guess nothing was known about this before he became vice president and only became known when the Americans left.

3. As in the scenarios you mentioned perhaps the nations in the region would have cleaned up their own backyard and shed their own blood if it was that important to them but I don’t think it was because they took no action, Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1991 and the neighbors took no action. I am not placing any kind of fault on Iraq’s neighbors for inaction because they knew Iraq better than the U.S. did.

I was not a supporter of Iraq before the U.S. invasion or after. My point as I illustrated above, if the previous regime was still in power there would have been much less heartache and pain, and much less destruction. Perhaps the Iraqi people are like the Russian who have an affinity for tyrant type rulers.

Maybe if the Iraqi government cared about what a Saddam sympathizer had to say, they would allow criminals and thugs to get away with murder in order to prove their "political maturity." If people want to partake in government freely and fairly, so be it. If people want to intimidate the political process and bully their way into more power than should be afforded to them then they will be tried accordingly. There is nothing wrong with Sunnis in government. There is something wrong with criminals and Al Qaeda agents in government. I advise you to learn more about the current situation or the previous regime before you chip in your two cents and start talking about pan Arabism being a better alternative to Shias partaking in the political process. It is far easier to ignore you when you are blithering on ignorantly in the Iranian forum.

"If people want to partake in government freely and fairly, so be it. If people want to intimidate the political process and bully their way into more power than should be afforded to them then they will be tried accordingly."

Well which ones are you talking about or do you put all their names in a hat and throw then up into the air and charge the first ten to hit the floor and then repeat.

"There is nothing wrong with Sunnis in government. There is something wrong with criminals and Al Qaeda agents in government"

Well there is little doubt how much of a thinking person you are.

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As the saying goes, be careful what you wish for. maliki and his mentors in Iran desperately wanted to sectarianize Iraq, which was had a beautiful, secular, syncretic culture. they wanted to sectarianize it and make it another Lebanon which they can rule with their little toe. They tried to do a genocide against Sunnis. I'm afraid they have suceeded in sectarianizing the country. Do not forget that most Kurds are at the end of the day, Sunnis, even if nominally and culturally. Nouri al Irani has nobody but himself to blame if the Kurds have suddenly become aware of their Sunni-ness.

Baathi ? Hashemi is a stupid "moderate Islamist" like the Muslim brotherhood of Egypt, he with hs stupid ideals opposed the Baath regime since 1963. There is an arraest warrant against him since Saddam's time ( just like there is a death sentence against Nouri al irani since 1982 ). The guy is a stupid "moderate Islmaist" and don't insult Al baath by associating him with them. However, at least the dimwit is realizing his folly in opposing Saddam for all these years, hopefully he and others like him see the light before its too late for Iraq.

Saleh al Mutlak is another clueless liberal who left the Baath in 1976, I wonder whats Maliki's beef with him.

Maybe an attack like this will get people mad again, neigbours killing each other, create a better situation for Iran and KSA to do their dirty work in Iraq.

Become aware of our "Sunni ness"? I am an Iraqi Kurd, and we are Sunni Muslims by religion. Just because we choose not to participate in Shia and Sunni Sectarianism, does not mean we do not consider ourselves Sunni. Although I agree Maliki is a sectarian, who is trying to marginalize Sunnis, I cannot take someone like you seriously who has "biro7 bidam nafdeek Saddam" by his avatar. And I do not why its allowed in the first place.

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Become aware of our "Sunni ness"? I am an Iraqi Kurd, and we are Sunni Muslims by religion. Just because we choose not to participate in Shia and Sunni Sectarianism, does not mean we do not consider ourselves Sunni. Although I agree Maliki is a sectarian, who is trying to marginalize Sunnis, I cannot take someone like you seriously who has "biro7 bidam nafdeek Saddam" by his avatar. And I do not why its allowed in the first place.

ignore him, he's a troll.

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Another series of bloody attacks!

Car bomb attacks kill 15 in Iraq

Mon Jan 9, 2012 6:54PM GMT

LAST UPDATE

esmaeeli20120109181033750.jpg

File photo shows a car burnings following a bomb attack in the northern oil-rich city of Kirkuk.

At least 15 people have been killed and dozens of others have been injured in two separate car bomb attacks in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

The attacks targeted police officers as well as Shia pilgrims making their way to the holy city of Karbala for religious commemorations.

According to Iraqi security sources, seven people were killed after an explosives-laden car detonated near a police vehicle in the northeast neighborhood of al-Shaab.

Nineteen others were also injured in the blast. Two policemen are reported to be among the dead.

Half an hour earlier, eight others were killed in a car bomb attack targeting Shia pilgrims near a mosque in the western neighborhood of al-Muwasalat. More than 25 others were also injured in the attack.

Meanwhile, 15 Afghan pilgrims were injured in a car bomb on the outskirts of the central city of Hilla.

PressTv

Edited by Noah-

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There is nothing moderate about them, and it is about time Maliki stopped covering for them and started making an example of them instead.

LOL you think Maliki and his pathetic little regime and all those who work for him are oh-so-damn-strong ( "make an example of them"0. I bet he and those who vote for him couldn;t make an example out of their servants ( if they have any). Actually I would enjoy if the Kurds made an example out of him / them.

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Guest Zahratul_Islam

LOL you think Maliki and his pathetic little regime and all those who work for him are oh-so-damn-strong ( "make an example of them"0. I bet he and those who vote for him couldn;t make an example out of their servants ( if they have any).

Yeah.. beating servants isn't so big with Iraqi Shiites.. you are spot on about that. We are more cultured and compassionate than your knuckle dragging counterparts. We don't like to make examples of of those weaker than us in order to feel big and strong because we remember and wear our own oppression as a badge of honor.

Actually I would enjoy if the Kurds made an example out of him / them.

That is really saying something given that you are a sniveling Saddam worshipping Arab nationalist who likely thinks Kurds had it coming.

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