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rachel

Fasting While Pregnant

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Assalaamu alaikum, sisters,

Do any of you have any experience with fasting in (relatively) late pregnancy? I know it's allowable not to fast, but I would really like not to miss it and have to make it up again later. I am 7 months into a so-far low risk, uncomplicated pregnancy (alhamdulillah!). I'm thinking that the only serious issue at this stage would be dehydration, which I plan to avoid by keeping cool and relatively inactive during the days and eating regular meals and drinking lots through the night. Has anyone out there done something similar? If so, how did it feel?

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My Mum did that when she was eight months pregnant with either me or my brother (I don't remember which). Her doctor advised her against it, for fear that her haemoglobin level would drop, but by the end of the month it had actually risen! She says she used to drink an entire jug of milk for suhoor every day.

I think it's okay if you don't have any complications, but then you have to have a super nutritious iftar and suhoor.

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You are suppose to fast unless you think it will definitely harm your baby

Fast when I was pregnant it wasn't bad felt the same as before.

I'll look and post fatwa in a few that say what I said

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Sayyed sistani

1736. Fasting is not obligatory on a person who suffers from a disease which causes excessive thirst, making it unbearable, or full of hardship. But in the latter case, that is, of hardship, he should give one mudd of food to poor, for every fast.

At the same time, as a recommended precaution, such a person may not drink water in a quantity more than essential. If he recovers later, enabling him to fast, then as a recommended precaution, he should give qadha for the fast.

1737. Fasting is not obligatory on a woman in advanced stage of pregnancy, for whom fasting is harmful or for the child she carries. For every day, however, she should give one mudd of food to poor. In both the cases, she has to give qadha for the fasts which are left out.

1738. If a woman is suckling a child, whether she is the mother or a nurse, or suckles it free, and the quantity of her milk is small, and if fasting is harmful to her or to the child, it will not be obligatory on her to fast. And she should give one mudd of food per day to poor.

In both the cases, she will later give qadha for the fasts left out. But this rule is specifically applicable in a circumstance where this is the only way of feeding milk to the child - (as an obligatory precaution). But if there is an alternative, like, when more than one woman offer to suckle the child, then establishing this rule is a matter of Ishkal.

Go to www.sistani.org this was copied and paste

Sayyed Ali khomenei

http://www.islam-pure.de/imam/fatwas/practical04.htm#Pregnant%20And%20Nursing%20Women

Edited by Marie

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AS SALAM ALAIKUM RACHEL.

InshaAllah baby and you are in good health. May Allah protect you both ameen.

Sweet sis, i advise you not to fast in ramadhan while being pregnant. I say this out of experiance and also according to islamic laws.

As much as we love to fast and make ibadah of ramadhan..when you have a child, this child has priority over your body. I was 26 weeks pregnant with my son, ramadhan was a few days away, i took 3 medical opinions, 2 of muslims and one of a non muslim who had a good rep with women where i live.

All 3 of them said to me DONT FAST.. the 2 muslims told me that fasting affects the baby, the water in the sack needs to be at a good level and later in pregnancy ur water levels will be checked, if ur low on water or even nearly at that point ull be told to drink alot more through the day. i was at a low level and shouted at by my friend/gyno for not drinking enough..so out came the xtra water bottles lol.

I really do understand ur love of fasting mashaAllah because i ws in the same place 2 yrs ago wanting so much to fast but i ddint... i gave instead to the poor people around me as per the islamic laws. Am glad i gave my son his rights to food and drink ... i cant comprehend making a unborn baby fast .. days are long in the west and here also in middle east + hot ...

Please keep me posted on ur pregnancy mashaAllah tabarakAllah. If u need any advice, im around with aot of time on my hands.

Fee Aman Allah.

xxx rubs for baby in womb

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(salam)

I've just read an article about this issue in the book Superfreakonomics the summary goes as follows:

What is the worst month to have a baby? If you know someone in Michigan who is having a baby this year you should hope it's not born in May. If so, the baby is roughly 20% more likely to have visual, hearing or learning disabilities as an adult. Same issue if you live in southeastern Uganda. Why? The simple reason is: Ramadan. Parts of Michigan have a substantial Muslim population as does southeastern Uganda. Islam calls for a daytime fast from food and drink for the entire month of Ramadan. Most Muslim women participate even while pregnant. The effects are strongest when fasting coincides with the first month of pregnancy.

The book goes into more detail.

The aim of this book is to look at things statistically only.

I wont give an opinion.

(salam)

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This may help : http://www.babycentre.co.uk/pregnancy/nutrition/ramadan/pregnant-fasting

What is the worst month to have a baby? If you know someone in Michigan who is having a baby this year you should hope it's not born in May. If so, the baby is roughly 20% more likely to have visual, hearing or learning disabilities as an adult. Same issue if you live in southeastern Uganda. Why? The simple reason is: Ramadan. Parts of Michigan have a substantial Muslim population as does southeastern Uganda. Islam calls for a daytime fast from food and drink for the entire month of Ramadan. Most Muslim women participate even while pregnant. The effects are strongest when fasting coincides with the first month of pregnancy.

Do they give references? I would like to read the studies they base this on.

Edited by .InshAllah.

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This may help : http://www.babycentre.co.uk/pregnancy/nutrition/ramadan/pregnant-fasting

Do they give references? I would like to read the studies they base this on.

Its based on the paper published October 2008 by Douglas Almond and Bhashkar Mazumder " The Effects of Maternal Fasting During Ramadan on Birth and Adult Outcomes"

Once you've read it i would be interested in reading your opinion on it.

BTW the link you gave completely contradicts what this paper is saying.

(salam)

Edited by sarmad17

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OK, before I was married I worked as a nurse in labor and delivery and I know for a fact that if a woman is dehydrated it can cause contractions which in turn can bring on preterm labor. Any child born before 37 weeks is considered preterm and even before 38 weeks is pushing it. Sometimes you get lucky and a child born at 34 or 35 weeks has perfectly developed lungs and is above 5 pounds, but even then the baby will more than likely have trouble regulating body temperature and won't know how to suckle from the mother or bottle.

This may help : http://www.babycentr...regnant-fasting

Do they give references? I would like to read the studies they base this on.

I don't know any references but this is probably correct because a mothers diet has a huge effect on the developing fetus physically and mentally. My neighbor has a child the same age as my daughter and she fasted through Ramadan while pregnant at the same time as having gestational diabetes. The doctors told her not to even consider, but she did it anyway. He kid has behavior problems through the roof and doesn't even speak yet, so I guess the article could very well be correct.

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