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Spanish Youth Rally In Madrid Echoes Egypt Protest

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13437819

Spanish youth rally in Madrid echoes Egypt protests

Crowd in Madrid's Puerta del Sol square, 18 May 11 The Madrid crowd are rallying supporters and building momentum through social media networks

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About 2,000 young people angry over high unemployment have spent the night camping in a famous square in Madrid as a political protest there grows.

A big canvas roof was stretched across Puerta del Sol square, protesters brought mattresses and sleeping bags and volunteers distributed food.

The nature of the peaceful protest, including Twitter messages to alert supporters, echoed the pro-democracy rallies that revolutionised Egypt.

The Madrid protests began on Sunday.

On the first evening, police dispersed the protesters, but on Tuesday they let them stay overnight.

Spain's 21.3% unemployment rate is the highest in the EU - a record 4.9 million are jobless, many of them young people.

Spanish media say the protesters are attacking the country's political establishment with slogans such as "violence is earning 600 euros", "if you don't let us dream we won't let you sleep" and "the guilty ones should pay for the crisis".

The atmosphere in the square has been quite festive, with the crowd singing songs, playing games and debating.

They are demanding jobs, better living standards and a fairer system of democracy.

About 50 police officers are deployed in side-streets off the iconic square and outside the Madrid municipal government building.

The protesters are not identifying with any particular political party, Spanish media say, but they are getting more organised.

In another echo of the Cairo rallies that eventually forced President Hosni Mubarak from power in February, the Spanish protesters have set up citizens' committees to handle communications, food, cleaning, protest actions and legal matters.

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sounds interesting in a way and confusing in another , everyone wants a better system than the one currently ruling , but noon is offering an idea of what that neo system might be

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Honestly I don't see how this is much different from political demonstrations before the Arabs started kicking up dust. And truthfully I doubt this will go anywhere since they don't really have a coherent program.

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Honestly I don't see how this is much different from political demonstrations before the Arabs started kicking up dust. And truthfully I doubt this will go anywhere since they don't really have a coherent program.

I have no idea , i mean all protests are a group of angry people against not so angry authorities right?

maybe because they have used twitters , maybe cause they protestors are all youths and maybe ... and this is the most likey cause , is that they are self automated , no hidden authority behind them , no charismatic leader , no current formed organized opposition that represent them in parliament ?

there had been protests in Lebanon before and still there are , but they were between tow parties , also ,demos in Egypt are not new , there had been many demos for many years against Mubarak, they had not been covered at all

and it is not about the political system , best guess it is all about economy reforms

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Protests not associated with a political party aren't really unheard of either. And it is all very well to want 'economic reform' but unless you have some consistent idea of how you want to reform the economy, you probably aren't going to accomplish much.

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Protests not associated with a political party aren't really unheard of either. And it is all very well to want 'economic reform' but unless you have some consistent idea of how you want to reform the economy, you probably aren't going to accomplish much.

it is 45% unemployment rate among youths in Spain , 21% unemployment rate of the whole population , it is half of the youth going jobless with or without a degree

they are demanding to be able to provide themselves with the basic needs i don't think that's too much to ask or too illogical with or without a plan

and erm , they have got nothing to lose except their days , they haven't accomplish nor waiting to accomplish anything under the current conditions

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Guest Stefan

The big difference between these protests in Spain and those in Egypt is that the Spanish don't claim that the last elections in Spain weren't fair.

They say they want a more democratic system - fine, let them discuss about how they can change the spanish constitution, and if the majority of the spanish people want this constitution to be changed according to the protesters' wishes.But they can't ask Zapatero to step down.Zapatero won a fair election.

EDIT : also, Zapatero didn't break any law, or the Constitution, as far as I know.

Edited by Stefan

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The big difference between these protests in Spain and those in Egypt is that the Spanish don't claim that the last elections in Spain weren't fair.

They say they want a more democratic system - fine, let them discuss about how they can change the spanish constitution, and if the majority of the spanish people want this constitution to be changed according to the protesters' wishes.But they can't ask Zapatero to step down.Zapatero won a fair election.

EDIT : also, Zapatero didn't break any law, or the Constitution, as far as I know.

Just for clarafication, it wasnt me who claimed it resembles Egyptians protests ,it was BBC plus some other news agencies

what made them say that is something we can speculate or go and asks them , Egyptians didn't ask Mubarak to step down , they asked the whole regime to step down , they shouted down down to regime not to Mubarak alone , to rewrite the constitution to reform the whole Gov institution to review the internal economic policies the foreign policies etc

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Unemployment in general and youth unemployment in particular have been endemic to (most) European economies for a generation. The only thing likely to change it is to scale back on all the regulations and social security type costs on labor. They kill the market for labor that isn't massively productive and make producing entry-level jobs almost impossible. Unfortunately nobody in Europe seems willing to pay that price, so nothing has changed since the 70's. In Germany at least, since that's the European country I am most familiar with. I know the other Continental European countries have followed a similar path but I couldn't give you details off the top of my head.

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Unemployment in general and youth unemployment in particular have been endemic to (most) European economies for a generation. The only thing likely to change it is to scale back on all the regulations and social security type costs on labor. They kill the market for labor that isn't massively productive and make producing entry-level jobs almost impossible. Unfortunately nobody in Europe seems willing to pay that price, so nothing has changed since the 70's. In Germany at least, since that's the European country I am most familiar with. I know the other Continental European countries have followed a similar path but I couldn't give you details off the top of my head.

O.J. Blanchard is a Research Associate in the NBER's Programs on Monetary Economics and Economic Fluctuations and Growth and a professor of economics at MIT

says "Anybody attempting to explain the evolution of unemployment in Europe over the last 30 years must confront the following set of facts: First, high unemployment is not a European trait. "

http://www.nber.org/reporter/summer04/blanchard.html

as far as i read , there is variation between different European countries and between Europe and US though they had been through same economical shocks , Sweden and UK being among the best countries in Europe to cope with unemployment , US being better than EU

but i can not disagree on your comment about labor market and social insurance ,though it sound much more complicated when i read the article

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Oh yes, it is way more complicated and I don't pretend to understand all the details. But the labor market in the UK and Sweden operate differently from those of Spain, Germany or France. In those countries it is very hard to fire a person and the employer has to provide all sorts of social security, pensions and the like. Hiring somebody is close to adopting them and agree to care for them for the rest of their life. In those conditions businesses hire as few people as possible, since if they end up hiring too many people or not liking the worker they are stuck. When basically every business in the country tries to hire as few people as possible, boom, high unemployment. The UK has much more flexible hiring laws and Sweden does too so they don't have the same problems as France, Spain and Germany. High unemployment isn't inherently European, but it is inherent in the economic system most West European nations have chosen to adopt for the last 40 years.

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I hope they don't start blaming Muslims for causing unemployment. Because then they might go on a killing spree like back in the good old days. No doubt anti-Islamic forces will use the frustrations experienced by the unemployed to further their agenda.

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I hope they don't start blaming Muslims for causing unemployment. Because then they might go on a killing spree like back in the good old days. No doubt anti-Islamic forces will use the frustrations experienced by the unemployed to further their agenda.

They are cold on the outside when they have problems in their country. Sometimes as cold as the French and can come off as sour or rude. But deep down some of them are warm and friendly.

I think the Spanish of today have become a lot more open minded than those barbarians of the past.

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They are cold on the outside when they have problems in their country. Sometimes as cold as the French and can come off as sour or rude. But deep down some of them are warm and friendly.

I think the Spanish of today have become a lot more open minded than those barbarians of the past.

Barbarians? why?

migration is problematic to the European countries on many scales- as beneficial to the European countries as well- , it wouldn't be surprising to hear restrictions on migrations or different laws in the future

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