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In the Name of God بسم الله

Tens Of Thousands Syrian Pro Govt Protesters.

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Can bank owners dictate US policy? No, not really.

"PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON - (After breaking with Colonel House) who with Warburg engineered the Fed. act: "I am a most unhappy man; unwittingly I have ruined ..."

It seems they did... in 1913. Many times before that as well (hit the books if you don't believe me, check out Andrew Jackson's struggle). Now you're living out the horror and if you're not effected yet and aren't super-rich, believe me you will be soon.

"The Federal Reserve banks are one of the most corrupt institutions the world has ever seen. There is not a man within the sound of my voice who does not know that this nation is run by the International bankers -- Congressman Louis T. McFadden (Rep. Pa)

He was later poisoned for this and many other acts of transgression against the holy bankers.

I could go on for 200 hours. I've been fighting banking reform in Syria the last 5 years, I know all about how they work.

EDIT: In my more evil streaks, I've even considered joining them. I'm not exactly an idiot as you might imagine and working with them would make life a lot easier.

Is the media 'controlled'? Frankly that's a complex question that I had to read whole books on in school. The easiest answer is that is does cooperate with the government in many ways, but for its own ends.

It's controlled, but not by the government. It cooperates with itself, because the same entity that controls it also controls the government.

And many westerners may indeed agree with you, but that means squat. A lot of westerners don't know much about their political system either.

They can feel the corruption though and they have a keen sense of smell -- they know when something stinks.

And sorry if I seem overly pedantic or like a scholar. I studied political science in the university quite recently so rambling about the details of various governments comes naturally. :angel:

It's fine and I'm always up for an interesting discussion but this one goes pretty deep into the system. Just because I'm from the east doesn't mean I'm not knowledgable about the west and neither does it mean that a westerner is ignorant about the east. See this man for example:

http://www.joshualandis.com/blog/

He knows his stuff.

Edited by Schrodinger
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I'm not accusing you of being ignorant. Any Syrian who speaks nearly perfect English is probably well educated and intelligent.

Andrew Jackson was almost 200 years ago and dealing with a totally different banking system. That system has almost nothing to do with the Fed. Mcadden appears to have been quite a character. Apparently the Russian Revolution was run from Wall Street for some reason or other. This may be connected with the Jews who run the Bank of England. They were cleverly using the Fed to reduce the British national debt.

We are being led by the international Jews operating through Great Britain and the Bank of England, and it is the purpose of those who are directing and cooperating that debts be reduced to 10 percent or canceled entirely....

I daresay they planned to support the International Communism with the proceeds. But it gets even better for the Limeys. The Fed was actually created to bring the US back into the British Empire.

Congressional Record, June 14, 1934

Congressman McFadden: "....Whereas the lobbying activities of the said British Ambassador, Sir Ronald Lindsay, carried on in the halls of the Capitol, at the British Embassy, in the houses of citizens of the United States, in the offices of predatory international bankers, on shipboard, on the trains, and elsewhere, have for their purpose the taking from the United States Treasury of assets which it is the sworn duty of this Government to protect by every means within its power, not stopping short of war, if need be; and whereas the said Lindsay's lobbying activities likewise have for their purpose the defeat of measures enacted into law by the Government of the United States to insure the repayment of moneys advanced to Great Britain on her written promise to repay them; and whereas the lobbying activities of Sir Ronald Lindsay likewise have for their object the overthrow of the Government of the United States and its reorganization as a part of the British Empire:.... (CR, 6-14-1934

Ok, it has been a century now and it still hasn't worked. But those Jews are devious dogs, quite capable of plots that span centuries.

Apparently Holocaust denial has a long history.

Congressional Record: June 15, 1934

There is no real persecution of the Jews in Germany, but there has been a pretended persecution of them because there are 200,000 unwanted Communistic Jews in Germany, largely Galician Jews who entered Germany after the World War, and Germany is very anxious to get rid of those particular Communistic Jews. The Germans wish to preserve the purity of their own blond racial stock. They are willing to keep rich Jews like Max Warburg and Franz Mendelssohns, whose families have lived in Germany so long that they have acquired some German national characteristics. But the Germans are not willing to keep the Galician Jews, the Upstarts.

So a great show is put on, largely by German Jews themselves, in the hope that Uncle Sam will prove himself to be as foolish as he was before and that we will allow those Galician and Communistic Jews to come in here. That is why Miss Perking has been placed in charge of the Department of Labor. She is there to lower the immigration bars. It is thought that, being a woman, she may disarm criticism. She is and old hand with the international Jewish bankers. If she were not, she would not be here in a Jewish-controlled administration.

When the so-called "anti-Semitic campaign" designed for American consumption was launched in Germany, France was alarmed because she feared the Galician Jews might be dumped on French soil. French newspapers published articles concerning the menace, but now that France has been shown that the purpose of the anti-Semitic campaign is to dump the 200,000 communistic Jews on the United States she is worried no longer. "Ah", she says, "Ol' Uncle Sam, he is to be the goat. Very good."

Ok, I'm having too much fun with this. But you can't ask me to seriously believe that the Fed is a plot to subject the US to the UK and USSR for the benefit of international Jewry.

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You know, this reminds me alot about the crisis in Somalia a few years ago. The ICU had control of the country, and aside from some of their authoritarian policies,they, for the first time in decades, had united Somalia. An impressive feat for a nation that was torn by tribal conflicts, corrupt warlords vying for power.

Yet, some people found this to be intolerable, complaining about their strict rules, complaining about Sharia law. These same people were nowhere to be found when the country was in shambles, yet now when an independent group comes into power, they come in droves displaying their fake empathy for Somalia. And guess what? After Nigeria Ethopia invaded - which led to a humanitarian disaster, with hundreds of thousand of refugees - these same people that were so passionately showing concern for Somalia under the 'Islamic Courts Union' were nowhere to be found.

Similarly, some of these posters here, with their fake empathy for Syrians, will again crawl back into their holes, if and when Bashir is overthrown and the country descends into chaos. I'm glad people aren't falling for this, and can see through this facade.

Edited by Fiasco
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*nitpick* I think you meant to say Ethiopia. Nigeria would be quite a walk. But I agree with the spirit. The West tends to notice its humanitarian duty when politically convenient.

Ouch. My bad, i knew Nigeria didn't sound right. Should've fact checked.

:squeez:

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Andrew Jackson was almost 200 years ago and dealing with a totally different banking system.

That system has almost nothing to do with the Fed.

You're quite right that it was a different system, but the goals and the characters involved were essentially equivalent. The servitude now remains equivalent, though ironically more open despite everyone being ignorant of it:

http://www.rayservers.com/images/ModernMoneyMechanics.pdf (I have the original if you want it)

Mcadden appears to have been quite a character. Apparently the Russian Revolution was run from Wall Street for some reason or other.

Hmmm well, it wasn't quite wall street per se, but a lot of the bankers involved liked to roam the area. It was revenge from the family of the Csar and also a promotion of the "anti-thesis": communism. The system they wish to, more or less, implement in the most corrupt fashion possible as warned to us by "Max" Stirner, one of the (if not the) greatest German philosophers in history.

This may be connected with the Jews who run the Bank of England. They were cleverly using the Fed to reduce the British national debt.

They're not even Jews but he had basically the right idea, it was an export of the banking system of Europe. It wasn't long before the great depression occurred due to controlled money expansion, much like the earlier incident involving J. P. Morgan (the tool, most of whose money was return to its rightful owner in Europe) which was used as a justification for the federal reserve system.

I daresay they planned to support the International Communism with the proceeds.

And gosh, what a coincidence they helped Lenin (bank rolled by the Warburg family) and Trotsky make their way to Russia, even forcing Canada into letting Trotsky out of prison, before "Sir" William Wiseman (the british man who pressured them) became a partner at Kuhn, Loeb. On the US front, the socialist/crypto-zionist Edward House also pressured Canada. Those damn commies, outsmarting international bankers and politician-soon-to-become-bankers!

But it gets even better for the Limeys. The Fed was actually created to bring the US back into the British Empire.

Not quite, it was to bring them onto the same banking system/enslavement which they had escaped, fought and died against.

Apparently Holocaust denial has a long history.

Except they didn't even get a chance to get holocausted before he died. Can't call him a denier just yet I think. ;) That said, I don't like his racist tone, but will have to investigate his claims of the "Galician Jews" (primarily of the ashkeNazi streak) migration. Though it may taint his words to you today, you have to understand the world view was quite different back then so you should at least investigate his claims further.

Ok, I'm having too much fun with this.

Don't be too amused, the plot is in its terminal phase:

silver3dbousd.png

But you can't ask me to seriously believe that the Fed is a plot to subject the US to the UK and USSR for the benefit of international Jewry.

Again, it's not a Jewish plot, though many of the international bankers do try and pretend they're Jewish when they aren't.

These [Edited Out]s are trying to penetrate Syria slowly but surely and I'm afraid they will win, no matter what happens on this little Fitnah front. We may win this battle but lose the greater war. Once the international bankers take control of your banking system, it's game over.

Anyway we can go about this alllllllllllllllllll day and night, I suggest creating a thread if one does not exist already (in which case kindly point me to it) to keep this thread on-topic.

Edited by Schrodinger
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28 killed today in Syria , havnt they legalized the protests yet ?

some of prophet companion fought with him ten they choose another way , Mubarak fought the Isaelis then became their best friends , Sadat alost won the war against the Isaelis then he signed the camp david thing , Assad the father did fought against the Isaelis then he killed his own poeple , Sadam was against the growing American and kings of gulf power in region but he ended up being a Hitler , Hitler himself was supported by his own people to some extent , he was elected democratically

morally i'd say ,keep with the good and if you are not sure who is good and who is bad , support non

for now i'd say as i aways said , Arabs need some fresh air , all of them do deserve this after 3 decades of gloomy environment

for Hizbullah and sake ? have faith in Allah

The last number I heard was 75 people killed.

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You are right yassameen, many Sunnis support and has to support Hezbollah. InshAllah it would flourish, May Allah give them victory. Its true that Arabs should be given some free and fresh air. Even I am also worried that whether there may be Shia, Sunni conflicts may araise after democracies are established. So that the US and Israel takes advantage of it. But what again I think Arab civilians are not that interested in Shia Sunni issues except few Wahabis and their scholars.

What I am always advising Arabs is, they should learn at least from Iraq war, that US and Israel have used Iraq to distaurb Iran but same ppl killed Saddam when they didnt want him.

The wahabi scholars should learn from this and act according to this, as per Sunni (because I am a Sunni born) Shia Sunni problem was just a political problem than religious. So they should have tolerance towards Shia than hatredness. InshAllah Shia Sunni become tolerable to each other then these Zionists have to run away from our lands.

28 killed today in Syria , havnt they legalized the protests yet ?

some of prophet companion fought with him ten they choose another way , Mubarak fought the Isaelis then became their best friends , Sadat alost won the war against the Isaelis then he signed the camp david thing , Assad the father did fought against the Isaelis then he killed his own poeple , Sadam was against the growing American and kings of gulf power in region but he ended up being a Hitler , Hitler himself was supported by his own people to some extent , he was elected democratically

morally i'd say ,keep with the good and if you are not sure who is good and who is bad , support non

for now i'd say as i aways said , Arabs need some fresh air , all of them do deserve this after 3 decades of gloomy environment

for Hizbullah and sake ? have faith in Allah

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You are right yassameen, many Sunnis support and has to support Hezbollah. InshAllah it would flourish, May Allah give them victory. Its true that Arabs should be given some free and fresh air. Even I am also worried that whether there may be Shia, Sunni conflicts may araise after democracies are established. So that the US and Israel takes advantage of it. But what again I think Arab civilians are not that interested in Shia Sunni issues except few Wahabis and their scholars.

What I am always advising Arabs is, they should learn at least from Iraq war, that US and Israel have used Iraq to distaurb Iran but same ppl killed Saddam when they didnt want him.

The wahabi scholars should learn from this and act according to this, as per Sunni (because I am a Sunni born) Shia Sunni problem was just a political problem than religious. So they should have tolerance towards Shia than hatredness. InshAllah Shia Sunni become tolerable to each other then these Zionists have to run away from our lands.

"You are right yassameen, many Sunnis support and has to support Hezbollah."

I am sorry, can you show me where she said that?

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^ Yes, I can see between 200-300 people in this funeral hall/graveyard. The coffins must belong to the snipers who infiltrated protesters and killed 75 people yesterday blaming the government.

But, these terrorist sympathizer Takfiris are 'clapping and dancing' and chanting 'Allaho Akbar' at the mean time at a funeral? :wacko: This Takfiri cult is very weird. No wonder why they are destroying mosques in Bahrain and burning the copies of holy Quran.

Assad should waited and removed emergency law some months later once the country was cleaned from Saudi-Zionist infiltrators. Because doesn't matter what he does now, Takfirs backed by imperialism will support Takfiri movements in Libya and Syria and Wahabi dictators in Saudi and Bahrain.

Edited by Noah-
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stop calling everyone takfiri , they are just people , ordinary people

takfiris are these : allehaidan calling the syrians to keep protesting even if Bashar killed the third of his own people , his message truley is , protest against Bashar or 1/3 of you at least will be killed < those are the takfiris

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zt38T6DVvZQ

Noah , you was happy with Qatif-east saudi protests , they wer as big as this in the vedio if not smaller , and people of Syria had been under alot of injustice , it is unfair to turn blind to this fact

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Noah , you was happy with Qatif-east saudi protests , they wer as big as this in the vedio if not smaller , and people of Syria had been under alot of injustice , it is unfair to turn blind to this fact

Why we Shias always think that we should be just and speak against everyone... But, when it comes to Shias, everyone ignores it or participate in oppressing us?

Why should I bother to hope and wish for a Takfiri government in Syria? If they are not Takfiri Ikhwani - Salafi - Wahabi forces, especially from these villages (Dara and etc..) from south Syria, then who are they? Assad might be bad, but he never went to Sunnis houses to kill people because of their sects or destroying their mosques, shrines or Churches. But, once these Wahabis come to power, they'll do everything FIRST AND FOREMOST to oppress Shias and then SERVE international Zionist Mafia as they are doing in Saudi, Jordan, Egypt, Qatar and Bahrain. If they are not Zeo-Saudi cults then who are they? Do you know any political movement or face behind these provocations who is not either belong to this Al Bandar guy or the puppets in exile on Zionists payrolls? Read previous pages under this topic, I don't want to repeat myself and give reasons.

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Hard to when the situation around me is this tense, I hope you understand.

Why, is there a danger the Bagel store on your street might be closing down? :lol:

I'm as calm as I can possibly be under these conditions, if I was someone else I'd be out there shooting salafist scum. But that's exactly what the zioScum want us to do.

Not going to find too many of them outside your apartment on US streets. :lol:

It's a perfect system of corruption though -- you can corrupt the system, steal everyone's real wealth and everyone will think the system is running fine because they can choose one of two agents every 4 years. Heh.

Not quote as perfect as the one in Syria. Speak to Rami Makhlouf about corruption, he could give you a few hints.

Of course, that's why they actively shape it with the control of the media. That way, it is reduced -- if it ever crops up though, that's when police brutality and the SWAT teams start rolling in shooting small children at home in the head while they sleep.

Or sent the tanks in ASSad has done in Daraa.

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HI IRISH-FRAUD LOL HEY LISTEN CAN YOU SHOW ME ONE VIDEO WHERE SYRIAN TROOPS OR SYRIAN SECURITY ACTUALLY SHOOTS ONE PROTESTOR?THERES HUNDREDS OF VIDEOS OUT,I DARE U SHOW ME ONE...PS CAREFUL WITH WHAT YOU POST,I HAVE A LIST OF SAME VIDEOS,SHOWING BAHRAINI!!!TROOPS CLAIMING ITS SYRIAN,VIDEOS SHOWING CHILDREN!!!BEATING PEOPLE ON FLOOR BUT NOT ASSAULTING CAMERAMAN 2 FEET AWAY AS THEY STARE AT EACH OTHER..I HAVE SEEN MANY VIDEOS IRISH CRUMB,YET NOT ONE SHOWS WHAT I M ASKING FOR,BTW I HAVE DOZEN VIDEOS FROM ALJZEERA WHERE THEY ARE DOCTORED,DEBUNKED EXPOSED,SO PLS IRISH FRAUD CAN YOU FIND ME ''JUST ONE''? PLS LITTLE EPRECHAUN,PLEASE..IF YOU HAVE ANY,IM SURE YOU DO..LMAOO

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CAN YOU SHOW ME ONE VIDEO WHERE SYRIAN TROOPS OR SYRIAN SECURITY ACTUALLY SHOOTS ONE PROTESTOR?THERES HUNDREDS OF VIDEOS OUT,I DARE U SHOW ME ONE...PS CAREFUL WITH WHAT YOU POST,I HAVE A LIST OF SAME VIDEOS,SHOWING BAHRAINI!!!

It's amazing isn't it? So many videos of bahraini, saudi, libyan and yemeni government forces attacking civilians, but none showing Syrian government troops attacking civilians.

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We now interrupt your regularly scheduled jackassery.

Editor’s Note: What follows is raw insight from a STRATFOR source in Syria. The following does not reflect STRATFOR’s view, but provides a perspective on the situation in Syria.

People are scared. An understatement, no doubt, but my friends — both foreign and Syrian — are worried about the developments. Almost all of my foreign friends are leaving and many have moved departing flights up in light of the recent events. Most Syrians don’t have this option and are weighing their options should sustained protests move to inner Damascus. Everyone is thinking along their sect even if they aren’t open about it. Much of the violence is attributed by Syrians to these mysterious “armed gangs.” Many are still placing hope in “Habibna” (literally “Our Love,” a nickname for the president) to bring about enough reforms to placate the demonstrators. A point that I was forced to make over and over is that a lot of the people protesting are doing so because someone they knew was killed and not because they were anti-government, although they are now. Privately, my Syrian friends admitted that Bashar [al Assad, the Syrian president] needs to make some major, major concessions quickly or risk continued protests and bloodshed of which would be attributed to him and not merely “the regime.”

By now we are all familiar with the cycle of protests reaching their high point on Fridays, after prayers. This Friday, however, was different for Syrians. Having seen the infamous emergency law lifted, albeit with serious caveats, Syrians were hoping for a relaxing of the security responses to the demonstrations. What they got was half as many demonstrators killed in one day as in all the days of demonstrations preceding it combined. It was almost as if things had been safer when the emergency law had been in effect. (On a side note, my friend guessed that maybe two out of every 100 Syrians could actually tell you what the emergency law was.) What was most striking about the demonstrations was that there were two in Damascus itself (Midan on Friday, April 22, and Berze on Saturday, April 23). While not in the city center these are by no means the far suburbs and countryside of Daraa or Douma. There were also protests in Muadamiyeh, which is right outside town next to the main bus station. I’ve heard that tanks along this road were seen April 24 pointing their guns not in the direction of the road but toward the city. The regime and everyone is terrified about protests in the city itself.

You could see the depression in the air on Saturday. Everyone knew that those killed from the day before would be having large funerals today and that those gatherings would likely be attacked as well. My Christian friends were especially worried due to rumors that churches were going to be bombed on Easter. As my friend put it, “I know they’re just rumors but I’m afraid they [the security apparatus] might actually do it.”

What is becoming increasingly apparent is that Bashar is not the reformer he claimed to be. His words are not being met by real, concrete action. Even though he might have wanted to reform and may have been hampered by others in the regime (cousin Rami Makhlouf, brother Maher), these efforts are steadily losing traction. The regime seems to be playing by “Hama rules” in its response to the demonstrations and it’s unlikely that this is happening without Bashar’s full consent at this point. The most positive assessment of him I heard was that he still wanted true reforms (although nothing game-changing) but that he was growing impatient with the demonstrators. One person conjectured that Bashar’s mistake was promising reforms when he first came to power. “If he hadn’t promised ‘reforms’ and not delivered on them people wouldn’t be so mad. He shouldn’t have said anything and given everyone false hope or actually followed through on them.”

Support for the protests is mixed. Many of those out in the streets are there because someone close to them was killed. Think tribal mentality: I wasn’t mad at you before but you killed my cousin/brother/friend and now I am mad. People are gathering to defend their honor. There is almost no organization inside Syria among the protesters. I asked several people and they agreed that the Muslim Brotherhood was almost non-present in the country. All that is coordinated is information being leaked out about the responses by the security forces against the protesters. As I told my friend, the problem is that unlike in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, all the demonstrators are dispersed across the country and do not have enough time to talk to each other to decide what they wanted. There is also a fairly widely held belief that much of the killings are taking place as a result of these armed gangs firing on security forces and innocents being caught in the crossfire. Some are quick to blame “foreign conspirators” although several of my friends admitted that whatever meddling by Abdul Halim Khaddam (the former Syrian vice president) and Rifaat al Assad (the president’s uncle living in exile in the United Kingdom) was minimal. Both of these guys have very, very little support on the ground and while the Muslim Brotherhood might have some latent support among Sunnis, they would not be welcome by any of the minorities in Syria.

At this point the regime is going to have to go Hama-style if it wants to completely shut down the protests, otherwise it will have to make some major concessions like multiparty elections and presidential term limits, which the regime won’t accept. From what I’ve heard is going on today it looks like the regime is opting to play it Hama-style.

Read more: Raw Intelligence Report: A View from Syria | STRATFOR

Link: http://www.stratfor.com/analysis/20110425-raw-intelligence-report-view-syria?utm_source=SpecialReport&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=110425&utm_content=readmore&elq=102e17510b77438a84c689c637f218a6

See also: http://www.stratfor.com/analysis/20110425-dispatch-syrian-paradox?utm_source=SpecialReport&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=110425&utm_content=watchvideo&elq=102e17510b77438a84c689c637f218a6

You may now resume your regularly scheduled abuse and insults.

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Syria Steps Up Its Crackdown While Promising Reform

By

ANTHONY SHADID

Published: April 19, 2011

BEIRUT, Lebanon — The Syrian government tried to placate protesters with declarations of sweeping reform on Tuesday while also issuing harsh threats of reprisals if demonstrations did not come to an end, as one of the Arab world's most repressive countries struggled to blunt the most serious challenge to the 40-year rule of the Assad family.

President Bashar al-Assad of Syria has used force to crack down on demonstrators.

The mix of concession and coercion came hours after the police, army and the other forces of an authoritarian state were marshaled to crush one of the biggest gatherings yet by protesters bent on staging an Egyptian-style sit-in in Homs,

Syria 's third largest city. At least two people died, protesters said, as the government cleared the square by dawn on Tuesday.

The events punctuated a tumultuous day in a monthlong uprising that, like Egypt's, has the potential to rework the arithmetic of a Middle East shaken with dissent. While Syria lacks Egypt's population or even Libya's wealth, its influence has long been strong in the region, given its location, its alliance with Iran and its status as kingmaker in Lebanon.

The complexity of its standing means that the government of President Bashar al-Assad finds advocates in the most divergent of places — from the Shiite Muslim movement of Hezbollah in Lebanon to some quarters in Israel.

The reforms were promised Saturday by Mr. Assad, but had yet to be articulated until Tuesday, when the government announced the repeal of an emergency law in place since the Baath Party seized power in 1963. The repeal must still be approved by Parliament or Mr. Assad, but that amounts to a formality. So does its true impact: the government has yet to show any real sign of easing its relentless grip.

Since the uprising began, the government has vacillated between crackdown and suggestions of compromise, a formula that proved disastrous for strongmen in Tunisia and Egypt. But the combination Tuesday was most remarkable for how divided it was.

Even as protesters buried those killed in Homs, the long-promised reforms ostensibly granted civil liberties, curbed the power of the police and abolished draconian courts. They legalized "peaceful protests" — coded language for those approved by the government — as the Interior Ministry warned in a statement, carried by the official news agency, that it would bring to bear the full breadth of the law against any other kind.

Echoing Egypt and Tunisia, the reforms, on paper at least, went far in meeting protesters' original demands, which have only grown in depth and scope as the bloodshed has worsened.

"The street is in one world and the president and the regime are in another," said Wissam Tarif, executive director of Insan, a Syrian human rights group, who was reached by phone.

The announcements followed another government crackdown on protests, this time in Homs, an industrial city near the Lebanese border and location of a famous Crusader castle.

For days, organizers in Syria have sought to replicate the experience of Tahrir Square in Cairo, where hundreds of thousands gathered to demand the end of the three-decade rule of President Hosni Mubarak . The square became a symbol and an instrument of the demonstrations that eventually forced him to resign in February.

Organizers envisioned as its equivalent Abbassiyeen Square, a crucial artery in the capital, Damascus, but were thwarted by security forces. Some organizers said they turned instead to Homs, where funerals on Monday for 14 demonstrators killed a day earlier drew thousands.

Some protesters said the security forces seemed taken aback by the crowds, which grew through the day in both numbers and anger. "A sit-in, a sit-in, until the government falls!" some shouted. "Please go," a banner implored of Mr. Assad. Mr. Tarif cited witnesses who said protesters had served tea and sandwiches as a chilly night fell, and organizers said mattresses and tents were carted in so protesters could serve in shifts.

Security forces made some attempts to disperse the crowds, but relented until after midnight. Then, protesters said, a mix of soldiers, security forces and police officers surrounded the square and attacked the demonstrators with tear gas and live ammunition after the crowds had dwindled to about 2,000.

Videos posted to Facebook and YouTube showed scenes of chaos, as volleys of gunfire echoed over a square faintly lit by yellow streetlights. Mattresses and the canvas of tents were strewn across the square, where a portrait of Mr. Assad superimposed on a Syrian flag read, "Yes to living together, no to strife."

"This is reform? This is reform?" asked a protester in one of the videos.

In another video, a protester tried to rally his compatriots.

"Come on back, guys!" he shouted. "Come on back, everyone!"

There were conflicting reports on the dead and wounded. From Lebanon, a resident of Homs, citing relatives' accounts, said 4 people had been killed and more than 50 wounded. Razan Zeitouneh, of the Syrian Human Rights Information Link, put the number of dead at three. Videos posted by Ugarit News, an independent Syrian outlet that has tried to cover the protests, posted online footage of what it said were funerals for two people.

"Nobody was allowed to stay," Ms. Zeitouneh said.

Protesters and organizers said the square was empty on Tuesday, and most shops in the city were closed. One resident reported that government loyalists had driven around the city in cars, occasionally firing into the air, to keep people off the streets. Another resident, a 26-year-old protester who gave his name as Abu Haydar, said security forces fired at a funeral on Tuesday, forcing mourners to leave the coffin in the street.

"They might have finished our sit-in this time, but we'll keep up with our peaceful demonstrations until we get our rights," vowed one protester in Homs, a 29-year-old engineer who gave only his first name, Ali.

Already, rights groups say, government forces have killed more than 200 people in demonstrations that have skipped from city to city since March, breaking a barrier of fear that long buttressed the rule of Mr. Assad.

As the violence has worsened, the implications have deepened. A deep current of anxiety over the uprising has pervaded Lebanon, where Syria's ascendant allies worry about the consequences if Mr. Assad falls. Likewise, Syria and Iran have long represented opposition to an American-backed order in the region, an alliance that would potentially not survive a change in government.

Remarkably, Mr. Assad, who once boasted of Syria's immunity to the so-called Arab Spring, finds himself increasingly in the situation of recently deposed rulers of Egypt and Tunisia. He has offered concrete reform only after his detractors seem to have won the initiative.

They say his reforms fail to win the confidence of a skeptical population or pale before demands that have far outgrown their earlier iterations.

"We were asking for reforms, but after the killings and the massacres we want to change the regime," Abu Haydar said.

Some organizers say a challenge as the uprising unfolds will be how to dispel the age-old claim of authoritarian Arab rulers that only they stand between militant Islam and a measure of secularism. In a country where Mr. Assad and his father long conflated dissent with subversion, organized political life remains undeveloped, save for an embryonic civil society along with the Muslim Brotherhood and organized religion.

"What is the alternative regime in Syria?" asked Rafic Nasrallah, the head of the International Center for Media and Studies in Beirut, a research group sympathetic to Syria's allies in Lebanon. "The Islamic fundamentalist groups? The West has no alternatives."

Mr. Tarif added, "I think this is going to become more bloody."

Hwaida Saad contributed reporting from Beirut, Katherine Zoepf from New York, and employees of The New York Times from Damascus, Syria.

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[b][/b] HI IRISH-FRAUD LOL HEY LISTEN CAN YOU SHOW ME ONE VIDEO WHERE SYRIAN TROOPS OR SYRIAN SECURITY ACTUALLY SHOOTS ONE PROTESTOR?THERES HUNDREDS OF VIDEOS OUT,I DARE U SHOW ME ONE...PS CAREFUL WITH WHAT YOU POST,I HAVE A LIST OF SAME VIDEOS,SHOWING BAHRAINI!!!TROOPS CLAIMING ITS SYRIAN,VIDEOS SHOWING CHILDREN!!!BEATING PEOPLE ON FLOOR BUT NOT ASSAULTING CAMERAMAN 2 FEET AWAY AS THEY STARE AT EACH OTHER..I HAVE SEEN MANY VIDEOS IRISH CRUMB,YET NOT ONE SHOWS WHAT I M ASKING FOR,BTW I HAVE DOZEN VIDEOS FROM ALJZEERA WHERE THEY ARE DOCTORED,DEBUNKED EXPOSED,SO PLS IRISH FRAUD CAN YOU FIND ME ''JUST ONE''? PLS LITTLE EPRECHAUN,PLEASE..IF YOU HAVE ANY,IM SURE YOU DO..LMAOO

Hi ComicalAli :lol:

By the way, your posts may be slighly more legible, but probably no more comprehensible if you managed to locate your caps lock key. I see your following post in the Bahrain section

If gather you are going to provide video footage of this attack on the girls school?. Surely you apply the same standards to your own posts first, that if you post a story about an event occuring, then it has to be backed up with video evidence. It would be useful if you can provide video showing evidence of each story you have posted in the Bahrain section.

When you have done this, I will provide videos to back up my claim.

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It's amazing isn't it? So many videos of bahraini, saudi, libyan and yemeni government forces attacking civilians, but none showing Syrian government troops attacking civilians.

It's amazing isn't it?. The story in your post in the above link, is started off by a line of text from you quoting.

Head of National Democratic Action Society (Wa'd) in Bahrain. Sunni Leader, one of the first to be arrested by Riyadh.

Where does his wife say in the statement it was Saudi troops?. How can they be Saudi troops if they not wearing Saudi uniforms?.

Quote

"During this time the some of the men outside start coming into the garden through the gate that was opened as mentioned in the last paragraph. Some were still on the road infront of the house. Mother and father walk outside to where the cars are and my mother notices 2 black cars, 2 jeep landcruisers, and about 3-4 small vehicles similar to corollas in size. Inside these small cars is about 4-5boys covered (mulathimeen).

All in all about 35-40 people outside the house. About 6 or 7 of the total are armed with rashashaat (guns)."

All these cars and guys with weapons walking around in front of her house at 1.50am in the morning, and no neighbours or anybody take a video of it, or wife not take a video either. Why wife or neighbours not take video as evidence?

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All these cars and guys with weapons walking around in front of her house at 1.50am in the morning, and no neighbours or anybody take a video of it, or wife not take a video either. Why wife or neighbours not take video as evidence?

I'm talking about something like this

You can see the Bahraini/Saudi troop shooting, and there's plenty more.

Show me Syrian troops shooting.

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I'm talking about something like this

You can see the Bahraini/Saudi troop shooting, and there's plenty more.

No you cant. You can see protesters walking towards what looks like a police or army checkpoint, and then one or two then lying shot in the road, whilsts others protesters oddly stand around in the middle of the road looking towards the checkpoint and dont run away. There could of been a sniper on rooftop on any number of buildings around the area that fired shots, if they were fired, and the whole scene was not staged. I guess you have never seen people look like they are lying shot or dead with blood around them in films?. Gunshots can be overlayed in the video footage later. Would not take a Hollywood film crew to setup.

Show me Syrian troops shooting.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=224_1303590464

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I don't see ONE syrian troop.

Here's some more bahraini ones

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=swScM_glSB0

and another

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=7NM8jzx6tBM

and another

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=kvNmxl8w3NU

[Edited Out], for everyone one of yours that shows NOTHING i'm showing you THREE that show POLICEMEN SHOOTING.

Edited by Ya Aba 3abdillah
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I don't see ONE syrian troop.

Why did those protestors which look like they only had mobile phones based on quality of footage not walk the few hundred metres of more off to where the troops were firing from and killing people. I mean it would the obvious thing to do in such a situation.

Here's some more bahraini ones

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=swScM_glSB0

The guys fell over and faked it. Why was the cameraman waiting there exactly for it to happen?. Is he psychic?

and another

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=7NM8jzx6tBM

Did you see the huge poof of smoke come out of the end of that gun he fired. It was most like a smoke grenade, or at the very worst a rubber bullet.

and another

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=kvNmxl8w3NU

You can see from the guns being reloaded that they are rubber bullet runs, and he was shot in the stomach with it. It will hurt, but it was NOT murdering like the video title says.

[Edited Out] for everyone one of yours that shows NOTHING i'm showing you THREE that show POLICEMEN SHOOTING.

[Edited Out]

You showed NOTHING more in first video you posted than I showed in video I posted.

Edited by Ya Aba 3abdillah
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Syria Escalates Crackdown as Tanks Go to Restive City

By ANTHONY SHADID

Published: April 25, 2011

BEIRUT, Lebanon — The Syrian Army stormed the restive city of Dara'a with tanks and soldiers and helped detain dozens in towns across the country Monday in an escalation of the crackdown on Syria's five-week-old uprising, according to residents and human rights activists. They said at least 25 people had been killed in Dara'a, with reports of bodies strewn in the streets.

Reuters TV

Syrian troops in tanks and armored vehicles moved into the southern town Dara'a and opened fire on Monday, according to residents.

The military's move into the town seemed to signal a new, harrowing chapter in a crackdown that has already killed nearly 400 people. Until now the government has been hewing to a mix of concessions and brute force, but its actions Monday indicated that it had chosen the latter, seeking to crush a wave of dissent in virtually every province that has shaken the once uncontested rule of President Bashar al-Assad, 45.

"The government has decided to choose the path of violence and repression," said a Syrian analyst in Beirut, who asked to remain anonymous for his safety. "How far can they go in this repression? That is the question."

As in 1982, when it crushed an Islamist revolt and killed at least 10,000 people in Hama, the military again showed its willingness to use force to repress its own people. Though there were rumors of discord among soldiers, the leadership is still dominated by Mr. Assad's minority sect, and its deployment to Dara'a illustrated that a crucial bastion of government support remained loyal — in stark contrast with Egypt, where the military's refusal to fire on protesters proved decisive in President Hosni Mubarak's fall.

The official Syrian news agency said Monday night that the military had entered the town at the request of citizens to hunt what it called "extremist terrorist groups."

Dara'a, a town of low-slung buildings with 75,000 inhabitants, has become almost synonymous with the popular revolt that has posed the greatest challenge to four decades of rule by the Assad family. Protests erupted there in March after security forces arrested high school students accused of scrawling anti-government graffiti on a wall, galvanizing demonstrations that have spread from the Mediterranean coast and eastern regions dominated by Kurds to the steppe of southern Syria, where Dara'a is located.

Residents said at least eight tanks drove into the town before dawn, with 4,000 to 6,000 troops, though some estimates put the numbers far lower, in the hundreds. Water, electricity and phone lines were cut, making firsthand accounts difficult and the numbers impossible to verify, and nearby border crossings with Jordan were reported sealed. Snipers took positions on the roofs of mosques, residents said, and a mix of soldiers and armed irregular forces went house to house to search for protesters.

"There are bodies in the streets we can't reach; anyone who walks outside is getting shot at," said a resident of Dara'a who gave his name as Abdullah, reached by satellite phone. "They want to teach Syria a lesson by teaching Dara'a a lesson."

A handful of videos posted on the Internet, along with residents' accounts, gave a picture of a city under broad military assault, in what appeared to mark a new phase in the government crackdown. Tanks had not previously been used against protesters, and the force of the assault suggested that the military planned some sort of occupation of the town.

"It's an attempt to occupy Dara'a," Abdullah said.

He said soldiers had taken three mosques, but had yet to capture the Omari Mosque, where he said thousands had sought refuge. Since the beginning of the uprising last month, it has served as a headquarters of sorts for demonstrators. He quoted people there as shouting, "We swear you will not enter but over our dead bodies."

He said residents had also tried to block roads with cement blocks and cars. "We didn't pay such a high price to quit now," he said.

For weeks, organizers have managed to circumvent the government's attempt to black out news from Dara'a and cities like Homs. But it appeared to have more success Monday.

Organizers themselves had trouble reaching contacts, and only occasional videos emerged from the tumult. One showed heavily armed soldiers taking up positions behind walls, a few feet from a tank parked on a leafy avenue. In another, a young boy threw a chunk of concrete at a passing tank. Other videos showed a cloud of black smoke rising and volleys of heavy gunfire echoing in the distance.

"These are the reforms of Bashar al-Assad," one resident said, as he filmed tanks entering the city. "He is reforming Dara'a with the tanks of Bashar al-Assad."

Wissam Tarif, executive director of Insan, a human rights group, said his organization had a list of 25 people killed Monday in Dara'a.

The United States called the violence "completely deplorable." Tommy Vietor, a National Security Council spokesman, said the Obama administration was considering sanctions against Syrian officials to "make clear that this behavior is unacceptable."

At the United Nations, European and American officials circulated a draft Security Council statement condemning the crackdown and calling on the government to respect human rights and freedom of expression. The draft endorses a call by Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, released last Friday, urging an independent investigation into the mounting death toll.

Across the country of more than 22 million, the government continued a campaign of mass arrests, protesters said. Security forces searched house to house in Azra, another restive town near Dara'a. Activists said security forces had also entered two towns on the capital's outskirts — Douma and Maadamiah — detaining dozens of people.

Clashes have been especially pronounced in the poor towns that encircle the capital, Damascus, and activists said there were reports of shooting during the raids.

In Jabla, a coastal city inhabited by Syria's Sunni Muslim majority and members of the minority Alawite sect, from which the government draws much of its support, security forces killed at least 12 people in a crackdown that began Sunday and persisted into the night. One resident said protesters had burned an army car and taken a soldier hostage.

"The army is deployed all over the area," said another resident, who gave his name as Abu Ahmed. "I can't describe how bad the situation was all night. It's a street war."

He said the shootings had exacerbated tension between Sunnis and Alawites, a potentially dangerous manifestation in a country with a mosaic of religious and ethnic minorities, many of whom fear the government's collapse may endanger them.

"The plate has shattered," he said, using an Arabic expression. "There's strife between us now, it's been planted, and the problem is going to exist forever in Jabla."

Hwaida Saad contributed reporting from Beirut, and employees of The New York Times from Beirut and Damascus, Syria.

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Three female journalists and tow male journalists including the director or mod of Aljazeera office in Lebanon who is a well respected well known journalist Ghassan bin Jeddo had resigned from Aljazeera tv due to its policy in dealing with the events in Middle east

Protestors did have the right to express their anger , killing them was a big mistake ,But it is not fair to turn the wishes and hopes of the perished poor people into the fire that eat them alive , who ever is after this in Syria is no less satanic than satan himself

anyway , This is vedio of Luna AlShibl a journalist in Aljazzera , one of the three whom resigned recently on a pro Syrian gov channel speaking about the media role in making the troubles in Syria

------------------------------

Anyone , do any know about the incedent of Qasr al Adly which was burned in Der'a, someone in youtube said that Aljazeera broadcasted the news an hour before it was actually burned ?

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Hi ComicalAli :lol:

By the way, your posts may be slighly more legible, but probably no more comprehensible if you managed to locate your caps lock key. I see your following post in the Bahrain section

If gather you are going to provide video footage of this attack on the girls school?. Surely you apply the same standards to your own posts first, that if you post a story about an event occuring, then it has to be backed up with video evidence. It would be useful if you can provide video showing evidence of each story you have posted in the Bahrain section.

When you have done this, I will provide videos to back up my claim.

i have posted videos of the whole school issuing a statement, you imbecil teachers associations protesting it ,you mental midget LoL what are you slow?

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anyway , This is vedio of Luna AlShibl a journalist in Aljazzera , one of the three whom resigned recently on a pro Syrian gov channel speaking about the media role in making the troubles in Syria

She resigned nearly 1 year ago, after she was told to dress more modestly and refused. She is also a Syrian, giving an interview on a pro-Syrian gov channel as you said. What did you expect her to say exactly?

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huh , dress modesty , non sense ,noon of Aljazeera females were wearing anything less than modest ,besides they were some group of the best of Aljazeera crew

anyway , this is how you get to the real news , i used to hear each side t hear how they attack the other side , it is the only way to get the real news in Middle east

besies she didnt defend teh gov nor the killings , they admitted it on tv and they didnt blamed the youths- the protstors-

all she talked about is teh media role in these revoloutions including teh egyptian, the tunisisan teh yemenis teh bahraini and even teh sudanese

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i have posted videos of the whole school issuing a statement, you imbecil teachers associations protesting it ,you mental midget LoL what are you slow?

ComicalAli should go back to school maybe. I asked where is the video of the ATTACK on the students in the school. Surely some of the teachers must of had a camera phone or video camera in the school?. Why not record the attack?. If peoples accounts alone are now sufficient evidence of an event as having taken place, well then that rule applies equally to people accounts in any country, or only in Bahrain?

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