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jund_el_Mahdi

Saudi " Day Of Wrath" (March 11th)

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Saudi Arabian "Day of Wrath" called for March 11th

http://abna.ir/data.asp?lang=3&Id=227699

Date: 2011/02/22

(Ahlul Bayt News Agency) - According to informed sources political activist announced that the day of wrath in Saudi Arabia on March 11.

Saudi political activist launched a page named "Day of Wrath" on March 11 in Saudi Arabia on Facebook.

According to the al-Alam website the group of young Saudis aim to political reforms.

You can find the group and activists on Facebook under the title "the people want reform of the system" It has almost two thousand members so far. Kingdom still do not have any elected legislative body, but the partial municipal elections held for the first time in the history of the country in 2005, which excluded women voters and candidates.

Activists have 12 demands, the most prominent is "constitutional monarchy between the king and the government." The activists also called for "legislative elections" and "public freedoms and respect for human rights" with "institutions of civil society actors" and "full citizenship and the abolition of all forms of discrimination."

Activists stressed the importance of "Adoption of the rights of women and non-discrimination", knowing that is prohibited in Saudi Arabia on women mixing with men without the presence of mahram are not allowed to drive and travel. Activists are demanding an independent judiciary and fair and parallel development and the equitable distribution of wealth in addition to seriously address the problem of unemployment.

**The risk group Exclusive Analysis estimates a 25% chance that the Saudi Kingdom will disintegrate, perhaps into three states. "We don’t think it is likely, but it will have a very big impact if it does happen," said Firas Abi Ali, the group’s Mid-East strategist.

"The threat to Saudi Arabia is if they have both a Shi’ite uprising and a Hejazi uprising at the same time on the other side of the country. The Saudi royal family depends on Sunni clerics for its own legitimacy. It cannot easily meet the demands of Shi’ite protesters, and is likely to oppose any move by Bahrain to do a deal in order to avoid setting a precedent," he said.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financetopics/oilprices/8341667/All-eyes-on-Bahrain-as-Gulf-tremors-frighten-oil-markets.html

Edited by Haji 2003

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The Muslim ummah has had enough of these criminal despots living in extravagance and luxury and reaping the people's wealth and lives through their blood and sweat. The adl of Allah subhanahu wa ta3ala inshallah is instilled in their hearts, and the world is crying out under oppression.

The stage is set for the reappearance of our holy Imam (as). Who else can deliver the mu'mineen and mu'minat, and ALL human beings seeking freedom and justice, other the WALI of Allah SWT!!

Mashallah brothers and sisters, prepare your souls, prepare yourselves spiritually and physically, we will have JUSTICE soon YA RAB.

The walls are cracking.

More like the walls are coming crashing down.

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yeah, wouldn't put my hopes up.

#1 priority for iraqis = kick out the occupier

They'r on their way out in a few months anyway, arent they? Or are there plans being made for permanent US bases?

Back to topic, the Saudi Shias need to make most of this.

Edited by shiasoldier786

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They'r on their way out in a few months anyway, arent they? Or are there plans being made for permanent US bases?

Back to topic, the Saudi Shias need to make most of this.

Saudi Shi'as have already been protesting, there have been some political prisoners released in the last day or so in response (but unfortunately not the ones that have been held for over 10 years without charge). Most of the protests thus far have been concentrated in Awamiyah, a village of Qatif.

I think that the only way for a big protest to work in Saudi is to let it begin in Riyadh or something, because those in the EP have protested a billion times for rights and have never, ever been heard. It is horrible to say it but the royal family has never listened to the shi'a protests - maybe they'd be more likely to if it was coming from 'their own', so to speak :(

But I do agree with you in part, that if there are protests already planned elsewhere, shi'as should be involved inshaAllah. Although if you know anything about Awamiyah or some of the other villages in Qatif they definitely will be :D

A great news site run by a Saudi shi'a (currently in exile in the US or UK, one of those two) is www.rasid.com , available in english and arabic, although the english section leaves a bit to be desired.

And one funny tidbit I just heard was that government employees get a holiday for the day of the king's return from medical treatment in... not sure what country, maybe Morocco. And the Bahraini king is heading to KSA to meet up :angry:

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Here is why Saudi king is meeting Bahrain tyrants http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/20/AR2011022002699.html

"The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia stands with all its capabilities behind the state and the brotherly people of Bahrain," the statement added.

More tanks and firearms to crush the Shias, if the Shias don't accept the negotiation.

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The Muslim ummah has had enough of these criminal despots living in extravagance and luxury and reaping the people's wealth and lives through their blood and sweat. The adl of Allah subhanahu wa ta3ala inshallah is instilled in their hearts, and the world is crying out under oppression.

The stage is set for the reappearance of our holy Imam (as). Who else can deliver the mu'mineen and mu'minat, and ALL human beings seeking freedom and justice, other the WALI of Allah SWT!!

Mashallah brothers and sisters, prepare your souls, prepare yourselves spiritually and physically, we will have JUSTICE soon YA RAB.

More like the walls are coming crashing down.

More crosses to add to your signature brother. In time :yaali:

The Middle-eastern suppressed giant is awakening by the second. Once it does, there's no stopping it.

One thing makes me curious. Do any of you think something like this is gonna happen in Pakistan anytime soon?

Here is why Saudi king is meeting Bahrain tyrants http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/20/AR2011022002699.html

"The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia stands with all its capabilities behind the state and the brotherly people of Bahrain," the statement added.

More tanks and firearms to crush the Shias, if the Shias don't accept the negotiation.

Yazid could never silence Imam Hussain (as)

They'll never be able to crush us. Hurt us they may, take our lives they may, but in the end Allah is the best of planners, and He has the most amazing plans for the both of us.

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In Saudi Arabia, reformers intensify calls for change

By Caryle Murphy, Correspondent / February 22, 2011

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

0222-SAUDI-KING_full_380.jpg

King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz is due to return tomorrow after three months away to a country where reformers inspired by Egypt are calling for greater transparency and equality.

When his royal jet lands here in the Saudi capital on Wednesday, ending a three-month absence, King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz will find a nation seemingly moored in the eye of the epic storm howling around it. But it is also clear that the octogenarian king, who went to New York in late November for back surgery and then to Morocco to convalesce, is returning to a realm touched in significant ways by the youth rebellions roiling the Middle East.

More than ever before, Saudis are openly calling for change, including political reforms. The most vociferous are tech-savvy youths who have obsessively followed their peers’ historic movements, especially in Egypt, on Twitter and Facebook. True, King Abdullah – whose oil-rich coffers provide the country with generous benefits and material development – is genuinely liked by most of his subjects. And the government is shielded by a religious culture in which rebellion is deemed illicit and public street protest considered gauche.

But those agitating for change have made the Internet their virtual Tahrir Square, with locations like #EgyEffectSA on Twitter acting as a public forum for how they see Egypt affecting Saudi Arabia.

Demands include women's vote, younger leaders

In a move timed to the king’s return Wednesday, a group of 40 young Saudis, mostly journalists and rights activists, have signed an open “Letter to the King.”

The signers say they were inspired by Arab youth elsewhere, and by the king’s encouragement of national dialogue. They asked for elections for the advisory Shura Council, the right of women to vote and run as candidates, strong anticorruption measures, and greater fiscal transparency and accountability.

In addition, they want the Cabinet reshuffled so that ministers’ average age, now 65, is reduced to 40. In another effort – albeit one that did not get very far – 10 moderate Islamists, including university professors and lawyers, defied the ban on political parties and announced they were forming the Islamic Umma Party. “We think the royal family is not the only one who has the right to be leader of the country,” Abdul Aziz Mohammed Al Wohaibi, one of the party’s founders, said in an interview. “We should treat the royal family like any other group.... No special treatment.”

Asked if the group had been launched because of events in Egypt, Al Wohaibi replied that they “had created an environment for a movement like this.”

And last week, the king’s half-brother Prince Talal bin Abdul Aziz said in a BBC TV interview that unless the king made further reforms the kingdom risked future revolution. Although Talal is a maverick with little support within the royal family, his remarks are being widely discussed by Saudis.

Significantly, these calls for change do not include an end to the monarchy, which most Saudis believe would spell disaster.

“Most people, including the young, really do believe in the monarchy, especially King Abdullah – everybody adores him,” says Eman al Nafjan, a prominent Riyadh-based blogger. “It’s just a matter of pushing for reforms” such as an elected parliament and “more transparency and accountability when it comes to the country’s budget.”

Chief concerns: Unemployment, corruption, detention without trial

There have been some fleeting demonstrations: By college graduates who want the Education Ministry to give them jobs; by Jeddah residents angry about flood damage, and by about 50 women demanding the release of male relatives held for years without trial for alleged terrorist-related activities. nemployment, corruption, and these long-term detentions are the issues fueling the most discontent here.

“We need a total reform regarding the dignity of the citizen,” says Mohammad al-Hodaif, who has three male relatives detained for long periods without charges.

A religious conservative, Mr. Hodaif took his daughters to a Chinese restaurant to celebrate the fall of Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak. Egypt, he said, was “a revolution of freedom and democracy. People are eager for freedom and democracy. Not just in Egypt. In all Arab countries.”

Riyadh attorney Abdulaziz al-Gasim also avidly followed Egypt’s gripping transformation on Twitter and on TV. Its affect on his own government, he says, is clear.

“It has put them in the most difficult situation in their lives because this is a clear battle," Mr. Gasim says. "The goal now is very clear.... It is for good governance and guarantees of that by a constitutional state.”

No sign that government will listen

There is no sign, however, that the government is ready to listen to any political demands. Founders of the Umma Party were arrested and several remain in detention.

In a meeting last week with Saudi newspaper editors, Interior Minister Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz, another half-brother to the king and a likely heir to the throne, said that events in Egypt were the work of outsiders and would have no effect on Saudi Arabia, according to a participant and others who got reports on the seven-hour gathering.

Prince Nayef also warned his audience about liberals trying to make Saudi Arabia like the West, they said.

Many Saudis agree with Nayef. They are deeply conservative and leery of change that would dilute their religious identity. And even those who want some reforms are worried about jeopardizing their domestic stability.

“I’m afraid of chaos, like in Iraq,” says Suliman Aljimaie, a Jeddah attorney who thinks change is coming too fast in the Arab world. “The United States said it would move Iraq to democracy and now you see what happened there…. Change should be [introduced] slowly, not with this speed.”

For now, all eyes are on King Abdullah and what he will say or do when he arrives.

“Everyone is holding their breath and delaying doing anything drastic until the King is back,” Al Nafjan wrote on her blog. “Whatever he does when he gets back will decide the fate of our country.”

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2011/0222/In-Saudi-Arabia-reformers-intensify-calls-for-change/%28page%29/2

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Saudi Monarchy bribing the people

Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah has announced a series of benefits for citizens amounting to $10.7 billion, as he returned to the country

The move comes as governments in the region scramble to deal with pro-democracy uprisings sparked by youth unemployment and political repression

As part of the Saudi scheme, state employees will see their incomes increase by 15 per cent, and additional cash has also been made available for housing loans.

No political reforms were announced as part of the package, though the 86-year-old monarch did pardon some prisoners indicted in financial crimes.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/02/2011223105328424268.html

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i was reading in yahoo news the day of rage in saudi was 11 march .... can u pl please post the right date so theres no confusion....

Shia shoul d get rid of kings and royal family.. this is the time.. Shia in bahrain will never get this chance again for decades. the atmosphere is right .. the world is watching. almost 3rd dictator is toppled kings r feeling weaker than ever.

no kings in bahrain only democracy ......... struggle till kings r ousted no matter how much blood is spilled by saudi bahrainis

Edited by .K.A.R.R.A.R.

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