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Libyan Officer:imam Musa Sadr Held In Libya Prison

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Rather doubt it would be the Iranians... they've had pretty good relations with Gaddafi.

ahmadinejad-gaddafi.jpg

Very naive statement when Imam Musa Sadr was pretty much the forefather of resistance in Lebanon against the Zionists and deeply influenced and affected by Imam Khomeini, even in direct contact with him constantly, and the revolutionary spirit in Iran. Imam Khomeini consistently praised him and he would be a great asset to Islamic Revolution. If anybody, it would be Iran.

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Very naive statement when Imam Musa Sadr was pretty much the forefather of resistance in Lebanon against the Zionists and deeply influenced and affected by Imam Khomeini, even in direct contact with him constantly, and the revolutionary spirit in Iran. Imam Khomeini consistently praised him and he would be a great asset to Islamic Revolution. If anybody, it would be Iran.

What does that have to do with the fact that Gaddafi and the Iranian regime have been friendly allies anyway? Would you give a hug like that to one of your enemies? Wonder what if anything the Iranians have been saying about what's going on in Libya.

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What does that have to do with the fact that Gaddafi and the Iranian regime have had been friendly allies anyway? Would you give a hug like that to one of your enemies? Wonder what if anything the Iranians have been saying about what's going on in Libya.

....it has everything to do with it. You're saying you doubt they would free him, because they've established "friendly relations" with each other. I know you're trying to portray that IRI and Ahmadinejad are good buddies with Qaddafi, and indirectly trying to imply they don't mind all this killing and don't care about the Imam, but anyone intelligent enough here won't fall for it. They go about it smartly and not "Okay hand over Musa Sadr or else."

Anyway, they're not allies, they established relations like Iran does with any other country (bar "Israhell" and USA for obvious reasons), to improve relations, both economically, and have infrastructure projects together and other joint companies in business. That doesn't mean they are "friendly allies". Russia and China are deep in business with USA, are they good chums too?

Do you really think IRI does not want Imam Musa Sadr freed? Really? Last year they formed a joint committee about Imam Musa Sadr. Though hopefully now he is free.

Iran and Libya have formed parliamentary friendship group, said a member of Iran's Parliament National Security and Foreign Policy Commission Heshmatollah Falahatpisheh.

Iran-Libya group involves 11 parliamentarians and Libya-Iran group includes 15 members, he said.

The two sides will pursue the issue of Shiite Leader Imam Musa Sadr and expansion of Iran-Libya relations, he told ISNA.

http://www.isna.ir/ISNA/NewsView.aspx?ID=News-1475701&Lang=E

Wonder what if anything the Iranians have been saying about what's going on in Libya.

The tiresome anti-IRI rhetoric aside, they have condemned it.

Iran condemns crackdown on Libyans

Iran's Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast has condemned the Libyan regime's clampdown on pro-democracy protesters.

“The Islamic Republic of Iran deems the Libyans' uprising and their rightful demands in line with the region's Islamic awakening, and follows the developments in the country [Libya] with concern,” IRNA quoted Mehmanparast as saying in a statement on Tuesday.

Edited by jund_el_Mahdi
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If indeed this is true, maybe these people taking him away are not Hezb or Revolutionary guard, they could be Qaddafi forces, or worse yet, Israel and US have a hand in it. These devious snakes know he knows a lot, so they will try to get rid of him.

Yeah it sounds like that to me, but this is truly a ground breaking event. For some reason I doubt it....could he survive that long in Libyan prisons, where I'm sure it's no sumptous living; beatings, torture, starvation...if he got out, he must be very, very sick, weak and frail. That's what I think....but let's till keep out fingas crossed :o

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Yeah it sounds like that to me, but this is truly a ground breaking event. For some reason I doubt it....could he survive that long in Libyan prisons, where I'm sure it's no sumptous living; beatings, torture, starvation...if he got out, he must be very, very sick, weak and frail. That's what I think....but let's till keep out fingas crossed :o

At the same token, if indeed he is alive and was freed by the Revolutionary Guard or Hezb, they could have transported him to Iran perhaps to 'nurse' him back to good health and to recuperate before appearing in public....

INSHALLAH we hear good news soon.

Allah KAREEM, make dua brothers and sisters.

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^It is good time to reach out to Qaddafi's oppositions who turned against him because of these recent protests maybe through bribes and other means to make them speak and cooperate! I don't believe Iran or Hizb have much access directly to do things in regards to his case in Libya... especially when the country is in a big mess and everyone is running and killing each others..

And in regards to Israel or the US, I doubt they have any interests to kill or kidnap him.. He won't be much of any harm to these countries in any way.

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Subhanallah, ever since Egypt fell I was hoping that Libya would fall as well so that Imam Musa Sadr would be free. Inshallah he will be free soon. Wikipedia has an update on Imam Musa Sadr saying that :

Imam Musa Sadr is still Alive

On 21st Feb. 2011 during the Libyan awakening movement against the dictatorship of Gaddafi it has been claimed by a Libyan opposition activist Mr. Sami Al Masrati that Imam Musa Al- Sadr is still alive. He added Eyewitnesses have seen today a man resembling Imam Musa Al-Sadr who has been transferred in a small aircraft to an unknown place. Before this the Libyan opposition leader and the founder of Tabo Tribal Liberation Front Essa Abdulmajeed Mansoor had told that Imam Musa Sadr is still alive and was seen in the jail of Sabha.

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What does that have to do with the fact that Gaddafi and the Iranian regime have been friendly allies anyway? Would you give a hug like that to one of your enemies? Wonder ahat if anything the Iranians have been saying about what's going on in Libya.

Iran's Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast has condemned the Libyan regime's clampdown on pro-democracy protesters.

“The Islamic Republic of Iran deems the Libyans' uprising and their rightful demands in line with the region's Islamic awakening, and follows the developments in the country [Libya] with concern,” IRNA quoted Mehmanparast as saying in a statement on Tuesday.

read the full story from presstv

http://edition.presstv.ir/detail/166418.html

I am not really making an argument, just providing info.

BTW - I certainly hope this is true, but I doubt it very seriously. I can't see the Lybians keeping him alive all these years.

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Rather doubt it would be the Iranians... they've had pretty good relations with Gaddafi.

ahmadinejad-gaddafi.jpg

Najad has really disgusted me for the first time.not appealing at all.shame!!!

no matter what Iran does to help us,if Iran or its leadership forsakes Imam Musa al-Sadr and does not stand with him,we will be very displeased with Iran and will be displeased.

As Sayyid Ja`far Murtada has demonstrated, this book (which isn't an old one) is filled with forgery. Goes to show you that hadith fabrication isn't something that only happened in the old days but happens even now.

so who forged the hadith?

how old is the book? i thought the book is a rare gem according to a brother who posted earlier???

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Gaddafi moves Imam Musa Sadr

Sami al-Misrati, a member of the opposition to Muammar Gaddafi, stated in a phone conversation with Al-Alam: “A small airplane left the Al-Abraq Airport yesterday carrying someone who looked like Imam Musa Sadr.”

Issa Abd al-Majid Mansur, a prominent member of the Libyan opposition also announced that Imam Musa Sadr is still alive. A few other leaders of the opposition have stated that Imam Musa Sadr is still alive and is residing in a prison in Sabha.

Therefore, it is unclear whether this person who looked like Imam Musa Sadr was transferred to another city in Libya or outside of Libya. This report is troublesome for those who love this Islamic personality; not only those in Lebanon, rather those all over the world.

Read full article on Muntazar

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On 2/22/2011 at 3:41 AM, mehdi soldier said:

Najad has really disgusted me for the first time.not appealing at all.shame!!!

no matter what Iran does to help us,if Iran or its leadership forsakes Imam Musa al-Sadr and does not stand with him,we will be very displeased with Iran and will be displeased.

Take it easy brother, you never know what the real intention of these relationships are (on behalf of the IRI). As Bro Jund El Mahdi pointed out, the IRI has also set up a committee with the Libyans to investigate the disappearance of Imam Musa Sadr.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

On 2/22/2011 at 9:50 AM, shiasoldier786 said:

Take it easy brother, you never know what the real intention of these relationships are (on behalf of the IRI). As Bro Jund El Mahdi pointed out, the IRI has also set up a committee with the Libyans to investigate the disappearance of Imam Musa Sadr.

While I agree with what you say, I find it interesting how people become selective with these things (for some people they make the correct 70 excuses, for others they don't).

As I've said before, we would do best to follow the wisdom provided to us by the Prophet ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)) and the Ahlul-bayt (عليه السلام), and especially to read about their lives and the various trials they had to face. This will hopefully stop us from making rash conclusions and accusations, as we currently do.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Personally, I feel that President Ahmadinejad does not like Qaddafi because he is a tyrant, but he loves the Libyan people, so he would have a relationship with Qaddafi in order to help the people of Libya. I was told by a relative that after Imam Khomeini RA returned from exile to Iran and the victory of the Islamic Revolution, he was told that Qaddafi wanted to come to Iran and visit Imam RA. Imam's answer was that Qaddafi could come to Iran if he brought Imam Musa Sadr HA with him. Of course it didn't happen.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Personally, I feel that President Ahmadinejad does not like Qaddafi because he is a tyrant, but he loves the Libyan people, so he would have a relationship with Qaddafi in order to help the people of Libya. I was told by a relative that after Imam Khomeini RA returned from exile to Iran and the victory of the Islamic Revolution, he was told that Qaddafi wanted to come to Iran and visit Imam RA. Imam's answer was that Qaddafi could come to Iran if he brought Imam Musa Sadr HA with him. Of course it didn't happen.

He was certainly well informed and a good negotiator.

============

This shows the hypocrisy of Qaddafi and he probably will get hanged like saddam.

==========

Sins of the father, sins of the son

While Gaddafi has relied on empty revolutionary slogans to maintain power, his son looks to oil money for his.

Lamis Andoni Last Modified: 22 Feb 2011 10:53 GMT

The Libyan leader has presented himself as the champion of the Palestinian cause [GALLO/GETTY]

The sheer brutality of the Libyan suppression of anti-government protests has exposed the fallacy of the post-colonial Arab dictatorships, which have relied on revolutionary slogans as their source of legitimacy.

Ever since his ascension to power, through a military coup, in 1969, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi has used every piece of revolutionary rhetoric in the book to justify his actions, which include consolidating power in the hands of his relatives and close associates and creating a network of security forces and militias to coerce Libyans into conforming to the whims of his cruel regime.

Through his support for revolutionary movements in different parts of the world - ones, of course, which did not endanger his own rule - he has sought to portray himself as the 'defender of the oppressed', earning the wrath of the West in the process. But the people now courageously defying his regime's savage suppression are sending the message that anti-Western slogans, even if occasionally backed up by support for just causes, can no longer sustain oppressive regimes in the region.

A new era is underway in which leaders will be judged on their ability to represent the aspirations of the people and in which they will be held accountable for their actions. Issuing rallying cries against a foreign enemy, even when that enemy is very real, while inflicting injustice on one's own people will no longer be permitted.

Post-colonial Arab regimes, including those that rode the waves of or even at one point genuinely represented anti-colonial resistance, have had to resort to a reliance on secret police and draconian laws to subordinate their subjects. The lesson is clear: Without a representative democracy, Arab republics have metamorphosed into ugly hereditary dynasties that treat their countries like their own private companies.

While trampling over the interests of his own people, Gaddafi has modeled himself as the champion of the Palestinian cause, reverting to the most fiery verbal attacks on Israel. But this is a recurring theme in a region where leaders must pay lip service to the plight of the Palestinians in order to give their regime the stamp of 'legitimacy'. Gaddafi's 'support', however, did not prevent him from deporting Palestinians living in Libya, leaving them stranded in the dessert, when he sought to "punish the Palestinian leadership" for negotiating with Israel.

But even more cynical than his "pro-Palestinian" stand is his exploitation of the plight of the African people by anointing himself the leader of the continent. It is tragic, if reports prove to be true, that he used migrant sub-Saharan African labourers against the Libyan protesters. But it is, sadly, very believable that a ruthless dictator, driven hysterical by the prospect of losing his wealth and power, might pit the poor and marginalised against the poor and oppressed.

The darling of the West

Seif al-Islam, Gaddafi's son who appeared on Libyan state television to warn that the demonstrators threatened to sink Libya into civil war, unlike his father, does not need to pretend to endorse the world's underprivileged. For his power derives from something altogether different.

When Seif warned that "rivers of blood" would flow if the protests did not stop, he was giving himself the right, merely by virtue of being his father's son, to dismiss the grievances of millions of people and to issue outrageous threats.

Seif may look and sound more sophisticated than his erratic father, but his performance was one of a feudal lord unable to fathom why his serfs would defy his authority.

He has no need to employ his father's tactic of invoking vacuous revolutionary rhetoric, for Gaddafi has successfully used the country's Revolutionary Command Council and Revolutionary Committees - which are supposed to represent the interests of the people - to cement the power of his family and as tools with which to subjugate the masses.

But Seif's role has been secured not only by his power within the country. According to Vivienne Walt, a writer for Time Magazine, since the lifting of Western sanctions against Libya in 2005, Seif has acted "as an assurance" to the oil companies that have poured millions of dollars into the country.

"In interviews with oil executives, all say that Seif is the person whom they would most like to see running Libya. He has made occasional appearances at the World Economic Forum. And during two visits to Libya, I've seen countless corporate executives from the US and Europe line up for appointments with Seif," she recently wrote.

It is little wonder Seif feels confident enough to make threats against the Libyan people without possessing so much as an official title. His position as the darling of the West, he clearly believes, entitles him to trample on the lives of others. And it may also explain the West's hesitation over unequivocally condemning the sheer brutality of the Libyan regime.

Thus, while the father ensured his grip on power by building a dictatorship with a claim to "revolutionary legitimacy," Seif has been expected to secure the Western stamp of legitimacy by keeping the door to the country's main source of wealth open for the oil companies to exploit.

The father's repression in the name of the revolution and the son's status as an agent for the oil companies has created an oil-rich country where one-third of the population live below the poverty line and 30 per cent are unemployed. This is Gaddafi's Libya.

But the Libyan people are now shouting a loud goodbye to the Libya of Gaddafi and his family and, with great sacrifices, are building a new, freer country.

Lamis Andoni is an analyst and commentator on Middle Eastern and Palestinian affairs.

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial policy.

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How was it helping the Libyan people by being friends all those years with the thug in charge and thus helping to solidify his power as opposed to isolating him?

(bismillah)

(salam)

@ your pic of Ayatollah Khamenei: If you look back at my previous message, I said Imam Khomeini RA, not Imam Khamenei HA.

Maybe you don't remember that Libya broke rank with most of the Arab countries when it came out in support of Iran during the Iran–Iraq War.

Surely economic help and Islamic expositions could not occur without meeting and shaking hands.

In January 2010, Iran’s Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki visited Tripoli to discuss with his Libyan counterpart Musa Kusa.

They spoke about developing joint oil and gas projects and developing infrastructure like factories, roads, and hospitals in Libya.

How do you know that Mottaki didn't remind Kusa about the incarceration of Imam Musa Sadr? To get back on topic.

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(salam)

I think Mac was trying to prove a point that the behavior of IRI government is not very consistent with types of friends/relationships that they are having with ideals that it tries to promote. He can correct me if I am wrong here.

They are plenty of images of President of Iran with other dictators in the world: Zimbabwe dictator, North Korean representative, Syrian dictator, Saudis dictators and others.

Imam Khomeini, as far as I know was at least consistent (except he probably met the PLO Arafat). He probably suffered greatly for being unfriendly to foreign dictators/dignitaries.

It is indeed tough to be a diplomat (especially when you have to meet people you rather not and shakes hands/hug people you don't want to).

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(salam)

I ask of those not to speak against a government who is so high in rank. Iran is the only full organized Muslim country so dont fool yourselves by insulting them.

The reason Iran was good wirh Lybia was because the Lybians were Irans only supporters during the Iraq-Iran war. Therefore they appreciated what had been done for them alright? Learn your facts before speaking, Iran is never going to fail like the countries that have recently fallen!

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While I agree with what you say, I find it interesting how people become selective with these things (for some people they make the correct 70 excuses, for others they don't).

I wonder how generous they'd be if a picture surfaced of say a Mousavi, a Montazeri or a Shirazi giving someone like Netanyahu, Sharon or Saddam a man hug with a huge brotherly smile...

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maci, everybody knows your game here, so if you'd like, can you please create another topic with whatever you want to discuss, so we can keep this one about Imam Musa Sadr and the current situation.

Quote
Imam Musa al-Sadr never left Libya

Tue Feb 22, 2011 6:15PM

http://presstv.com/detail/166547.html

http://previous.presstv.ir/photo/20110222/shamseddin20110222175617450.jpg

A political expert says missing Lebanese leader Imam Musa al-Sadr might still be alive.

In an interview with Press TV on Tuesday, political analyst Roula Talj from Beirut said the son of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi had denied previous allegations that the visiting Lebanese leader had left for Italy.

“He did not admit that Imam Moussa al-Sadr was alive but … told me that they [Moussa al-Sadr and his companions] never left Libya,” Talj quoted Seif al-Islam Gaddafi as saying.

“And that all the allegations about them being in Italy were wrong,” she added.

“From my own analysis and people's reaction to this, I believe he is still alive,” the expert said in response to a question on the possibility of Sadr's livelihood.

It is widely believed in Lebanon that Imam Moussa al-Sadr, the founder of the Lebanon's Amal movement, was kidnapped on the orders of senior Libyan officials while on an official trip to Libya in August 1978.

Accompanied by two of his companions, Mohammed Yaqoub and Abbas Badreddin, Sadr was scheduled to meet with officials from the government of the Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

In 2008, the government in Beirut issued an arrest warrant for Gaddafi over Sadr's disappearance.

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(salam)

I think Mac was trying to prove a point that the behavior of IRI government is not very consistent with types of friends/relationships that they are having with ideals that it tries to promote. He can correct me if I am wrong here.

They are plenty of images of President of Iran with other dictators in the world: Zimbabwe dictator, North Korean representative, Syrian dictator, Saudis dictators and others.

Imam Khomeini, as far as I know was at least consistent (except he probably met the PLO Arafat). He probably suffered greatly for being unfriendly to foreign dictators/dignitaries.

It is indeed tough to be a diplomat (especially when you have to meet people you rather not and shakes hands/hug people you don't want to).

Mac is trying to prove a point that doesn't know jack about politics so all he can do is post pictures.

He doesn't realize that he has already proved that beyond all doubt.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Praying for Imam Musa Sadr HA.

Farsi website of Imam Musa Sadr's companions in Iran:

http://www.yaranesadr.ir/farsi/

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On 2/22/2011 at 3:41 AM, mehdi soldier said:

Najad has really disgusted me for the first time.not appealing at all.shame!!!

no matter what Iran does to help us,if Iran or its leadership forsakes Imam Musa al-Sadr and does not stand with him,we will be very displeased with Iran and will be displeased.

so who forged the hadith?

how old is the book? i thought the book is a rare gem according to a brother who posted earlier???

I am with you brother. In the past I have had respect for AN, but he should be careful. Maybe he is jeering at the munafiq ?! and practising taqiya ?

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(salam)

I still think we should wait until we get a firm confirmation about this news. These reports are not reliable. What is the urgency for Ghadafi to move someone who looks like him around? Ghadafi has a very serious problem on his hands. Also, I am not finding this being reported in the media?

You just keep your finger crossed and hope...make duas ..

Mac is trying to prove a point that doesn't know jack about politics so all he can do is post pictures.

You can dismiss his tactic as someone who knows jack about Iran, but his strategy can be effective. Have you not seen the famous picture of Saddam (LA) shaking hands with Donald Rumsfeld? No explanation was needed. What would be the caption for below?

65010387-libyan-leader.jpg

Right now, the Libyan dictator is like the worse person on earth. Anyone who has ever taken pictures with him is going to suffer embarrassment.

It’s best to come out and disassociate him (Ghadafi) and revile him in public.

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(salam)

I still think we should wait until we get a firm confirmation about this news. These reports are not reliable. What is the urgency for Ghadafi to move someone who looks like him around? Ghadafi has a very serious problem on his hands. Also, I am not finding this being reported in the media?

Which part exactly are you talking about? The whole point of this topic pretty much is to hope for it and make dua inshallah.

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I have been making dua day and night brother.

EVERYBODY PLEASE MAKE DUA.

Not to discount the power of dua'a in it's proper sphere, but he either is or isn't alive. No dua'as are going to make it true if it isn't already.

Here's hoping however if he is alive in one of these prisons, that he will survive long enough to be released and returned safely to his home.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Monday 11 May 2009 10:38

Biography and Activities

The Imam Musa Sadr

Sayyed Moussa as-Sadr was born on the 15th of May 1928 in the famous Iranian city of Qum. He attended his primary school in his hometown and then moved to the Iranian capital Tehran where he got in 1956 a degree in Islamic Jurisprudence. He went back to Qum where he started to give religious lectures in the various religious institutes of the city. He also published a magazine called "Maktabi Islam".

In 1960, he came to Lebanon to hold the position of the Islamic Shiite religious leader in the southern city of Tyre following the death of Sayyed Abdelhussein Sharafeddine. He began to be interested, in addition to the religious field, in the social and living conditions of the Islamic Shiite sect. In 1969 the Higher Islamic Shiite Council was founded and Sayyed as-Sadr was elected as its president for a duration of 6 years, and he became to be known as Imam. In the beginning of 1975 he was reelected for a period that was to end when he became 65 (i.e. on March 15, 1993).

Imam Moussa as-Sadr founded many social institutions, vocational schools, health clinics and illiteracy obliteration centers. His activity gains an important national dimension as he warned of the dangers of Israeli aggressions against South Lebanon - whose majority happens to be Islamic Shiites. However, as the Imam took care that his struggle should not acquire a restricted sectarian outlook, he established in 1971 a committee that included all the Southern Lebanese spiritual leaders (both Muslim and Christian) to follow-up the political and social activities.

On the 18th of March 1974, and following a series of demonstrations he led to protest against the government's negligence of the rural areas, the Imam founded the "Movement of the Deprived" that adopted the slogan of "continuous struggle until there are no deprived people left in Lebanon." During the civil war he founded the Amal Movement the "Brigades of the Lebanese Resistance", the military wing of the movement of the Deprived" which fought alongside the Lebanese National Movement and the Palestinian Resistance against the projects of partition and settling the Palestinians in Lebanon.

Imam as-Sadr was distinguished among all of his contemporary spiritual and political leaders for his openness especially towards Christians. He co-founded the Social Movement with the Catholic archbishop Grigoire Haddad (1960), participated in the Islamic-Christian dialogue in 1962, and lectured in a Capuchin Christian church during the Easter fast (1964). He mastered many languages and was a prominent intellectual. Imam as-Sadr played an all-important role in the Lebanese political life. Towards the end of August 1978 he mysteriously disappeared during a visit to Libya

Source:(Text courtesy of Al Manar Television, 1997)

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