Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

Turks Vote 'yes' In Referendum

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

  • Veteran Member

Turks have approved constitutional changes that are set to reshape the judiciary and curb the powers of the military, in a referendum seen as a tussle between an Islamist-influenced government and its secular opponents.

A provisional count, after polls closed at 14:00 GMT on Sunday, showed 58 per cent of voters approving the amendments, with 99 per cent of ballot boxes counted, according to NTV, a Turkish broadcaster.

"According to provisional results, the changes were approved by about 58 per cent ... The turnout was between 77 and 78 per cent," Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish prime minister, said.

Earlier opinion polls had suggested up to 56 per cent of Turks could approve the 26 constitutional amendments or that it might be too close to call.

"We have passed a historic threshold on the way to advanced democracy and the supremacy of law," Erdogan told cheering supporters of a vote that was seen as a crucial test for his governing Justice and Development Party (AKP). ..more Aljazeera...

------------

Congratulations to Turkey and to Gul-Erdogan supporters!!!!!!! I hope they progress and succeed and implement justice and equality in the country.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

One of the obstacles out of the way for entry into the EU.

Nein nein nein nein.

No way EU will allow Turkey to join them.

Never.

Gallipoli is too fresh in their minds. In fact, even the crusades are too fresh in their minds.

The Europeans don't take too kindly to losing, particularly when it is to an 'inferior race.' They need some more time for those wounds to heal.

Ya Ali

Edited by baradar_jackson
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

Turks have approved constitutional changes that are set to reshape the judiciary and curb the powers of the military, in a referendum seen as a tussle between an Islamist-influenced government and its secular opponents.

A provisional count, after polls closed at 14:00 GMT on Sunday, showed 58 per cent of voters approving the amendments, with 99 per cent of ballot boxes counted, according to NTV, a Turkish broadcaster.

"According to provisional results, the changes were approved by about 58 per cent ... The turnout was between 77 and 78 per cent," Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish prime minister, said.

Earlier opinion polls had suggested up to 56 per cent of Turks could approve the 26 constitutional amendments or that it might be too close to call.

"We have passed a historic threshold on the way to advanced democracy and the supremacy of law," Erdogan told cheering supporters of a vote that was seen as a crucial test for his governing Justice and Development Party (AKP). ..more Aljazeera...

------------

Congratulations to Turkey and to Gul-Erdogan supporters!!!!!!! I hope they progress and succeed and implement justice and equality in the country.

Ha! I had read about this referendum earlier in the week. An excellent development.

I hope some of the resident Turks (is btk stll around?) can give some closer insight.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

Nein nein nein nein.

No way EU will allow Turkey to join them.

Never.

Gallipoli is too fresh in their minds. In fact, even the crusades are too fresh in their minds.

The Europeans don't take too kindly to losing, particularly when it is to an 'inferior race.' They need some more time for those wounds to heal.

Ya Ali

I agree. And they will never say "NO" either. They want to hold Turkey hostage in this regard to have an indirect control over its politics and policies and gain its help as needed.

But after all AK made a very smart move!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nein nein nein nein.

No way EU will allow Turkey to join them.

Never.

Gallipoli is too fresh in their minds. In fact, even the crusades are too fresh in their minds.

The Europeans don't take too kindly to losing, particularly when it is to an 'inferior race.' They need some more time for those wounds to heal.

Ya Ali

Si Si Si Si

Yes way.

Of course you know more than those quoted in this BBC article. I don 't know why they didn't come to you first, you would have set them straight.

Mr Erdogan said the result meant the country had "crossed a historic threshold toward advanced democracy and the supremacy of law".

The European Commission has welcomed the results.

"As we consistently said in the past months, these reforms are a step in the right direction as they address a number of long-standing priorities in Turkey's efforts towards fully complying with the accession criteria," Enlargement Commissioner Stefan Fuele said in a statement.

Mr Obama called Mr Erdogan to congratulate him.

Proposed reforms

  • The military will be more accountable to civilian courts
  • Parliament will have more power to appoint judges
  • Civil servants will be given the right to conclude collective agreements and go on strike
  • The immunity from prosecution for the leaders of the bloody 1980 military takeover will be lifted

The US president "acknowledged the vibrancy of Turkey's democracy as reflected in the turnout for the referendum that took place across Turkey today", a statement released by the White House said.

German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle said the vote was critical for Turkey's bid to join the European Union

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

Nein nein nein nein.

No way EU will allow Turkey to join them.

Never.

Gallipoli is too fresh in their minds. In fact, even the crusades are too fresh in their minds.

The Europeans don't take too kindly to losing, particularly when it is to an 'inferior race.' They need some more time for those wounds to heal.

Ya Ali

Well that sure makes sense, considering Gallipoli was a campaign between the British and Ottomans, yet despite their defeat Britain are favoring the move for letting Turkey into the EU. Ironically, the Germans and Austria-Hungary fought alongside the Turks in that battle but they are now strictly opposed to allowing Turkey European membership.

Your second part also sounds funny, considering the modern day Turks of Anatolia are nothing but a bunch of genetically White European people, mostly of Greek and Slavic origin, who were subject to Turkification after they converted to Islam, yet ironically some of them are so brainwashed with pan-Turkic nationalism that they've clearly deluded themselves into thinking they're the pure Turks of Central Asia. Speaking of which, most of them can go to hell because they're not interested in Islam as much as they're interested in their fake identity, while the other more sane Turks are interested in their 'original' identity. Nevertheless, it's a battle of ethnic classification to those guys more than they give 2 ounces of peanut's worth toward their faith.

Turkey are now more democratic than before, so it's good for them.

Slowly but surely they are maintaining the requirements of EU membership. Now that they've gotten rid of the military-interference policy that Ataturk installed, their next agenda is to resolve the territorial issues they have in Cyprus by probably pulling out their troops from Northern Cyprus, since it was after all an illegitimate invasion according to global standards, especially since nobody (not even their muslim brothers) recognized their stupid pan-nationalist creation of a state in that island. Then after that they have to resolve their problems with the sons of Saladin (Kurds) and the never-ending story of the Armenian genocide.

Time heals everything, as they say. Slowly but surely...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

Well that sure makes sense, considering Gallipoli was a campaign between the British and Ottomans, yet despite their defeat Britain are favoring the move for letting Turkey into the EU. Ironically, the Germans and Austria-Hungary fought alongside the Turks in that battle but they are now strictly opposed to allowing Turkey European membership.

Your second part also sounds funny, considering the modern day Turks of Anatolia are nothing but a bunch of genetically White European people, mostly of Greek and Slavic origin, who were subject to Turkification after they converted to Islam, yet ironically some of them are so brainwashed with pan-Turkic nationalism that they've clearly deluded themselves into thinking they're the pure Turks of Central Asia. Speaking of which, most of them can go to hell because they're not interested in Islam as much as they're interested in their fake identity, while the other more sane Turks are interested in their 'original' identity. Nevertheless, it's a battle of ethnic classification to those guys more than they give 2 ounces of peanut's worth toward their faith.

Turkey are now more democratic than before, so it's good for them.

Slowly but surely they are maintaining the requirements of EU membership. Now that they've gotten rid of the military-interference policy that Ataturk installed, their next agenda is to resolve the territorial issues they have in Cyprus by probably pulling out their troops from Northern Cyprus, since it was after all an illegitimate invasion according to global standards, especially since nobody (not even their muslim brothers) recognized their stupid pan-nationalist creation of a state in that island. Then after that they have to resolve their problems with the sons of Saladin (Kurds) and the never-ending story of the Armenian genocide.

Time heals everything, as they say. Slowly but surely...

Mo, why do you always have to incite primal ethnic disputes? Nationalism is against Islam, as you must know.

I don't care about the racial composition of Anatolian Turks. Identity defines race, not vice-versa.

Anyway, the Germany and Austria of today are not inheritors of their imperial past anymore than Japan is the inheritor of her imperial past. European nationalities have all been amalgamated into a common identity (with, perhaps, the exception of the former Warsaw Pact states). And they inherit this identity from Britain and France, not from the Second Reich.

Turkey's democratization supposedly improves their chances of joining the EU. But the reduction of the military's influence will undoubtedly lead to the further Islamification of the country's politics (which, of course, would hurt their chances of joining the EU).

I personally think that Turkey is expressing the desire to join the EU with the knowledge that they have no chance. Either that, or they want to blackmail the Europeans by warming up to the IRI, a "rogue state."

Ya Ali

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

Mo, why do you always have to incite primal ethnic disputes? Nationalism is against Islam, as you must know.

I don't care about the racial composition of Anatolian Turks. Identity defines race, not vice-versa.

It was simply a reference to your 'inferior race' comment. From what I experienced, the Europeans do not feel superior to the Turks, since they consider them the same people. But they do pity them with regards to the fact they converted to Islam and started to speak a language not indigenous to them.

I will say this, though. I couldn't for a single minute sympathize with Turkey. They are more nationalistic than me and you (albeit fake nationalism), regardless of the small religious statements a few political leaders say here and there, only to appease to Saudi investors into pumping money in their economy.

Anyway, the Germany and Austria of today are not inheritors of their imperial past anymore than Japan is the inheritor of her imperial past. European nationalities have all been amalgamated into a common identity (with, perhaps, the exception of the former Warsaw Pact states). And they inherit this identity from Britain and France, not from the Second Reich.

Turkey's democratization supposedly improves their chances of joining the EU. But the reduction of the military's influence will undoubtedly lead to the further Islamification of the country's politics (which, of course, would hurt their chances of joining the EU).

I personally think that Turkey is expressing the desire to join the EU with the knowledge that they have no chance. Either that, or they want to blackmail the Europeans by warming up to the IRI, a "rogue state."

Ya Ali

Despite Britain's ugly history with Turkey (and we all know what they did to them), here they are being proponents of this move.

I do not know for one bit what is in America and UK's agenda but I suspect they see Turkey as a channel into the rest of the Islamic world.

They'll probably end up giving them the EU ticket, as I've said before, due to pitying over them. Of course it comes with a price tagged to it. The Turks are still expected to apologize to the Armenians for slaughtering their women and children.

They're also expected to pull out of an island that doesn't belong to them (Cyprus) and hence improve their relations with their Greek neighbors.

They've tackled the most difficult issue so far, which is a political referendum against military interference. I'm sure those other side-objectives are going to be much easier to accomplish. Eventually it will get them what they want, which is EU recognition of that small Istanbul territory they currently possess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

Mo, for whatever reason, seems to be the resident Turk-hater on these boards. Any of his posts on topics related to Turkey and Turks will show that. Ignore him and his nonsense.

As for the referendum, excellent development. The secularist idiots are slowly but surely becoming marginalized, and they know it, which is why they continue to spread fear and paranoia about an Islamist takeover.

Turkey will never become a theocracy, but its only natural that as the country democratizes further, the country will become more religious. The Turks have had more than 70 years of secular nationalist, ideological brainwashing - it will take time to wipe away that influence, but it will be done, step by step. These election results are a good start.

As for the EU, I don't believe for a second that Erdogan or the AKP genuinely want to join that degenerate club. Their main goal is to cripple the power of the secularist judges and the military, and they are using these reforms in order to strengthen the country's democracy. Once all the reforms and changes are implemented, there will no need for the EU. The EU is just a tool in the quest for a larger agenda, and within a few years time, Turkey will have absolutely no need for the EU, IMO.

If Erdogan wins the 2011 elections, then he will have sealed the deal. It is from that point onwards that the country will change fundamentally.

Edited by bkt900
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

Referendum victory boosts Erdogan

ANKARA: Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday celebrated an emphatic victory in a poll on constitutional changes that analysts said strengthened his party’s chances of winning a third straight term in elections next year.

Transport Minister Binali Yildirim hailed the outcome as a boost for democracy while AKP deputy chairman Huseyin Celik said the party’s agenda was to work on a new constitution after the 2011 elections. Official provisional results showed 57.88 per cent of the voters backed the amendments with 42.12 per cent against, giving Erdogan’s Islamist-rooted Justice and Development Party (AKP) a better-than-expected margin of victory. Turnout was 73.7 per cent.

Erdogan, who promised in his victory speech Sunday night to embrace the “no camp”, convened the cabinet Monday to evaluate the referendum result. “We will prepare a new constitution... in cooperation with the opposition and civic bodies... That is the message given by 58 per cent of the public,” Celik told reporters here.

Analysts said Sunday’s vote had solidified the AKP’s position as the dominant force in the EU-candidate country. “The comfortable margin of the “yes” vote is market positive as it indicates that the AKP has good prospects of winning a third term at the general elections due by July 2011,” Wolgango Piccoli, an analyst with the risk consultancy group Eurasia, said in a note to investors.

The AKP, the offshoot of a banned Islamist movement, has been in power since 2002, reigning over strong economic growth while introducing business-friendly policies and reforms designed to bring the country closer to the European Union.

Turkish shares rose 2.73 per cent to hit an all-time high of 62,260 points in trading Monday, in expectation of continuing political stability after the 2011 elections, while the changes earned praise from Europe.

But the AKP is suspected by many of harbouring a hidden Islamist agenda and has frequently clashed with the military and the judiciary which see themselves as defenders of the country’s strict secular system.

The referendum outcome is unlikely to resolve the bitter power struggle and the government’s intention to fully rewrite the constitution “could be the new source of tension,” Finansbank chief economist Inan Demir warned.

The constitutional amendments are aimed at restructuring the country’s top courts and curbing the military’s influence, steps that opponents fear mask an AKP drive to tighten its grip on power and gain a free hand to raise the profile of Islam in the country. The AKP denies the allegations.

Political commentators agreed that Sunday’s vote pointed at a public appetite for democratic change, but warned Erdogan not to overlook the substantial “no” votes in the referendum as he moves ahead with his plan.

“The most important guarantee that should be given is that the governing party will use its increasing power to put into practice a contemporary regime based on the supremacy of law,” and not place itself above the law, political analyst Gungor Mengi wrote in the popular Vatan daily.

Some analysts warned that Erdogan had attained immeasurable power with the vote result. “Nobody can stand in the way of Erdogan now,” Mehmet Yilmaz said in the mass-circulation Hurriyet daily. “What Turkey will see now is a series of steps that will turn him into Putin,” he said, referring to the Russian prime minister.

The most controversial changes approved in Sunday’s vote modify the make-up of the country’s top court and a key body that deals with judicial appointments. Top courts have often blocked AKP-sponsored legislation, including a move to allow the Islamic headscarf in universities, while the party itself narrowly escaped being banned for undermining secularism in 2008. Other provisions further curb the powers of the once-untouchable army, limiting the power of military courts and abolishing an article providing a judicial shield for the 1980 coup leaders.

TheNews

0,1020,1420742,00.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

(bismillah)

Under Ottoman Rule , between 1896 -1920 more then 2 million Armenians Were Butchered like Animals . the So called "Turkey" is My Ancestral Land .

During these Years the So called ISLAMIC Caliphate , which used ISLAM to Destroy , Butcher , Kill , and demolish my ancestors and my 10K year Historic land .

Shame on all those who deny the ARMENIAN GENOCIDE and for those who do not voice out their Discussed against these False Believers , For Masons are more valued then Armenians.

No Islamic Country to date has acknowledged what happened to the Armenians

let the memories of our Martyrs live for every , and may our new martyrs rise and return our lands.

(wasalam)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member

^I believe the referendum wasn't on deciding whether Armenian genocide should be acknowledged or not! Please read the reports again. You don't have to express your hatred against Turks in every single post. We can not put all topic and all matters in pending because of Turkey's stance on Armenians. Almost all countries have some negative issues against them that we can bring up on every single discussion. But, lets not do that and see if you have anything to say regarding the AK party winning here!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

^I believe the referendum wasn't on deciding whether Armenian genocide should be acknowledged or not! Please read the reports again. You don't have to express your hatred against Turks in every single post. We can not put all topic and all matters in pending because of Turkey's stance on Armenians. Almost all countries have some negative issues against them that we can bring up on every single discussion. But, lets not do that and see if you have anything to say regarding the AK party winning here!

A Islamic Turkey is going to be better for Armenia then the nationalist Kafirs.

N

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member

From what I experienced, the Europeans do not feel superior to the Turks, since they consider them the same people.

You should visit Germany, Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands. They consider the Turkish people as barbaric animals. Some even go on to say that they prefer Roma (Gypsies) to Turks.

Not sure which Europeans you're talking to, most that I've spoken with wish that the Turks would go back to Turkey.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It must be real freedom to believe what others say so you don't have to form your own opinions. That's why so many of us believe in any conspiracy rumour we hear.

Did anyone check up on the story about the Jews boiling unwanted children in milk? BTW is that whole milk, low fat, or skim?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...