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In the Name of God بسم الله

Honoring The Legacy Of Fadlallah.

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O God have mercy on the Honorable Defense of Islam and Tawheed, specially Tawheed, Ayatolalha Al-Fadallah, and make us honor what he tried to safeguard of your religion and not make his works in vain.

This is a thread to honor his legacy of what I believe he emphasized on while others didn't. To his haters, you can go make another of many threads against him, but stay out of this one.

This thread is for those whom honor him, those whom don't, stay out.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Sayyed Fadlullah’s Contributions to the Civil Society and the Downtrodden

fadlallahschools.jpg

“We have to improve our education and gain more scientific knowledge. If we do not make the best of our time now, we will not be able to build our future or develop in the Future…”

With these words Sayyed Muhammed Hussein Fadlullah used to address people, especially the youths, to benefit from every single minute of their lives. For that reason, his eminence opened many religious and social institutions that were mainly founded with the contributions of many Muslim benefactors.

In 1966 Sayyed Fadlalluh received an invitation from a group of believers who had established a society called “Usrat Ataakhi” (The family of Fraternity) to live with them in the Nabba’a neighborhood in Eastern Beirut. There, he started organizing cultural seminars and delivering religious speeches that tackled various topics.

Sayyed Fadlullah’s main concern was to continue to develop his academic work. He founded a religious school called” The Islamic Sharia Institute” in which several students enrolled and later became prominent religious scholars including Martyr Sheikh Raghib Harb. He also established a public library, a women’s cultural center and a medical clinic.

When the Lebanese civil war (1975-1989) forced him to leave the area, he moved to Beirut’s southern suburb where his top priority was to teach and educate people in this historically abandoned part of the country. For Sayyed Fadlullah, the mosque was the place to pray, teach, preach, and mark religious occasions, like Ashoura.

He soon started to teach Islamic principles, jurisprudence, and morals at an academic level.

Sayyed Fadlullah has also founded a religious school in the Sayyeda Zainab neighborhood in the Syrian capital, Damascus, where he used to teach regularly.

In addition to academic and religious activities, Sayyed Fadlullah concentrated on helping the downtrodden in compliance with God’s saying in the holy Quran: “Restrain thyself along with those who cry unto their Lord at morn and evening, seeking His Countenance; and let not thine eyes overlook them, desiring the pomp of the life of the world; and obey not him whose heart We have made heedless of Our remembrance, who followeth his own lust and whose case hath been abandoned.” (S18:v28)

Sayyed Fadlullah shared the people’s grievances, and made great efforts to find solutions for their problems. With the advent of the Lebanese civil war and the escalation of the Zionist aggression, he recognized quite early the enormous magnitude of the social problems that had generated. People were being killed, displaced and unemployed. He made every possible effort and established orphanages and schools for the children of martyrs and the poor as well as people with special needs.

Thus, the Mabarrat (charitable institution) Association was established, and it soon became one of the greatest models in this field. The Mabarrat established orphanages and expanded others, and built social and medical centers as well as mosques:

The Orphanages:

- Imam Al-Khouie Orphanage (Beirut-Daouha)

- Imam Zein Al-Abidine (a.s.) Orphanage Biqaa (Hirmil).

- Imam Ali Bin Abi Talib (a.s.) Orphange, South Lebanon. (The Ma`roub-Sour road)

- Virgin Mary Orphange (a.s.) South Lebanon (Jiwaya).

- Al- Sayyida Khadija Al-Kubraa(a.s.) Orphange, Beirut (Bir-Hassan).

-The Zainab (a.s.) Orphange West Biqaa (Suh`mur) Under construction.

-The Imam Al-Hadi Institute For The Deaf and Blind.

Medical Centers.

1- Bah`man Hospital Beirut (Haret Hreik).

2- Al Sayyida Al-Zahra’(a.s.) Hospital South Lebanon (Al-Abbasyyah) Under construction.

Sayyed Fadlalluh Institution for Charity and Social Welfare provides aid for thousands of needy each year in the form of a monthly donation, per annum, or in the form of educational or medical aid. It helps about a 100 thousand people every year, and the value of its average yearly donations, over the last few years, amounted to around 6 billion Lebanese pounds ($4 million).

Sayyed Fadlullah went all the way to fight ignorance, sectarianism, and reactionism, using the mosques, first in Bir- al-Abed and then in Haret Hreik as schools to teach ethics, spread knowledge and call for action. He also gave lectures in many universities, schools, social and cultural clubs, in an effort to emphasize Islamic values among the youth and the nation as a whole.

His eminence also lectured on Islam in many countries including, the United States of America, the United Kingdom, France India, Iran, Algeria. He participated in scores of Islamic and intellectual conferences around the world.

Schools

1- The Imam Al Khouie Orphanage Beirut (Dawha)

2- Imam Al-Baqir Secondary school Beka`a (Hirmil)

3- Imam Al-Jawad Secondary school Beka`a (Ali Nahri)

4- Imam Ali Bin Abi Talib school South lebanon (Ma`roub)

5- Imam Hassan Secondary school, Beirut (Ruwais)

6- Al-Mujtaba Secondary School, Beirut (Hay Al-Salum)

7- Imam Ja`afar As-Sadiq school South Lebanon (Jwaya)

8- Al-Kaouthar Secondary school Beirut (Bir Hassan)

9- Imam Hussein School, Beka`a (Suh`mour) under construction.

Vocational Schools

1- Ali Al-Akbar Vocational Institute Beirut (Doha)

Islamic Centers

1- The large Islamic Center, Beirut (Haret Hreik: Consists of the Al-Imamain Hassnian Mosque, the Zah`ra Hall and the Islamic Cultural Center.

2- Imam Hasan Askari Center Beka`aa’(Sira’in)

3- Imam Hussein Center-Beka`a(Jlala)

4- Imam Ali Bin Abi Talib center South Lebanon.(AL-Hawzah-Sour)

5- Ahl Al-Beit Mosque Beka`a’ (Rayak)

6- Imam Ja’afar Al-Sadiq Mosque Beka`a (Hirmill)

7- Ahl Al-Beit Center, North Lebanon (Tripoli)

8- Sayyida Zainab Mosque, Beka`a (Ba’albek)

Media and Information Centers

1- Al- Bashai’r Radio station.

2- Office of Information

Religious Colleges

1- Islamic Sharia Institute

2- Women’s Religious College

3- Sour (Tyre) Religious College

4- Al-Murtada Religious School (Damascus)

Worth mentioning, Sayyed Fadlullah succeeded in founding many institutions that have been helping many people around the country with the belief that these institutions would continue to achieve their sublime goals since they don’t depend on individuals… and the long journey keeps moving towards fulfilling these goals after Sayyed Fadlullah’s death.

Source: http://www.islamidavet.com/english/2010/07/04/sayyed-fadlullahs-contributions-to-the-civil-society-and-the-downtrodden/

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(bismillah)

Sayed Ammar Nakshawani gave a whole lecture on the Biography and Importance of Sayed FadhlAllah on the day of his death. Does anyone have the recording from the satellite channel?

:yaali:

Some of the ulama in that area are not happy with what Sayyid Ammar did. Funnily enough Sayyid Ammar in the past has spoken out against the opinion held by Sayyid Fadlallah regarding the attack on the house.

Perhaps it's not the right time but some day one of our English speaking ulama needs to sit on the pulpit and say the truth about this matter.

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The lecture was given by Seyyid Ammar was on Sunday evening at Hyderi Islamic centre. Full of praise for Ayatollah Fadlallah.

Some of the ulama in that area are not happy with what Sayyid Ammar did. Funnily enough Sayyid Ammar in the past has spoken out against the opinion held by Sayyid Fadlallah regarding the attack on the house.

Perhaps it's not the right time but some day one of our English speaking ulama needs to sit on the pulpit and say the truth about this matter.

Bro, you cant expect everyone to agree on all the views held by all marjas.

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Don't agree with everything he had to say but he truly was a great man. A great man who made great contributions, may Allah bless his soul and elevate his status. Most of us aren't worth his slippers. You can disagree with someone but still recognise what great peope they are/were. No harm in it whatsoever.

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Some of the ulama in that area are not happy with what Sayyid Ammar did. Funnily enough Sayyid Ammar in the past has spoken out against the opinion held by Sayyid Fadlallah regarding the attack on the house.

Perhaps it's not the right time but some day one of our English speaking ulama needs to sit on the pulpit and say the truth about this matter.

Do these local ulama consider themselves more educated on Islam than Syed Fadlallah?

I thought it was our belief that only the Qur'an could be taken as 100% authentic, but now it seems that if someone questions whether some event from history is completely proven, then it is as if he questions the Qur'an. If people disagree about some event, then they should have a scholarly debate about it, but they shouldn't react with the kind of over-emotional response that greeted the product of Syed Fadlallah's research. To be unhappy with someone because they have praised a scholar of the stature of Syed Fadlallah is simply ridiculous. Even if what he said about the attack on the house, and/or some other things, is wrong, does that mean he did nothing in his life worthy of praise, or that his good deed should be overlooked?

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You people are completely missing the point. These local scholars are not small time nobodies. They are representatives of the Maraja and that makes a difference. The maraja have said that Sayyid Fadlallah is not a Marja, it's not me who is saying it. I was actually speaking to the son of a well known scholar who was a very close friend of Sayyid Fadlallah's father. According to this scholar Sayyid Fadlallah declared himself to be a Mujtahid and Marja when he had no Ijaza. I am only telling you that because it comes from someone who is very close to their family.

I know the man has done a lot of good, I will even admit that he looks holy but that doesn't take away from the fact that his teachings are not all good. I personally wouldn't rule out the possibility that he was doing taqiyyah all this time and said things to unite the Muslims and throwing in a few very odd rulings (like the pornography one) to clearly show that his ijtihad is not valid. I am not here putting down his charity work I am talking about his ijtihad. We cannot judge a person's ijtihad based on his great charity work. And anyhow we are Shia Muslims, we know that it is possible for a scholar to do lots of good things but still be wrong in his teachings. We have many Sunnis/Christians and even atheists who have done lots of good work. Even an atheist like Bob Geldof has done good things for Africa, much more than most of us have done. If we want to praise the good work of Sayyid Fadlallah then so be it but lets not pretend that he was a qualified Marja or that his works were not full of mistakes.

This is not just about one historical event but a whole list of things.

Edited by Muhammed Ali
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You people are completely missing the point. These local scholars are not small time nobodies. They are representatives of the Maraja and that makes a difference. The maraja have said that Sayyid Fadlallah is not a Marja, it's not me who is saying it. I was actually speaking to the son of a well known scholar who was a very close friend of Sayyid Fadlallah's father. According to this scholar Sayyid Fadlallah declared himself to be a Mujtahid and Marja when he had no Ijaza. I am only telling you that because it comes from someone who is very close to their family.

I know the man has done a lot of good, I will even admit that he looks holy but that doesn't take away from the fact that his teachings are not all good. I personally wouldn't rule out the possibility that he was doing taqiyyah all this time and said things to unite the Muslims and throwing in a few very odd rulings (like the pornography one) to clearly show that his ijtihad is not valid. I am not here putting down his charity work I am talking about his ijtihad. We cannot judge a person's ijtihad based on his great charity work. And anyhow we are Shia Muslims, we know that it is possible for a scholar to do lots of good things but still be wrong in his teachings. We have many Sunnis/Christians and even atheists who have done lots of good work. Even an atheist like Bob Geldof has done good things for Africa, much more than most of us have done. If we want to praise the good work of Sayyid Fadlallah then so be it but lets not pretend that he was a qualified Marja or that his works were not full of mistakes.

This is not just about one historical event but a whole list of things.

(salam)

Very nice post, with a few interesting comments :)

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You people are completely missing the point. These local scholars are not small time nobodies. They are representatives of the Maraja and that makes a difference. The maraja have said that Sayyid Fadlallah is not a Marja, it's not me who is saying it. If we want to praise the good work of Sayyid Fadlallah then so be it but lets not pretend that he was a qualified Marja or that his works were not full of mistakes.

(salam)

So what if he was not a marja? His good work spoke highly of himself. And he left a legacy of charitable work. Since most scholars and lecturers will probably stop speaking ill about Sayyed Fadhullah (may God forgive him), maybe we should follow in their footsteps and desist from speaking ill about a dead person.

I don't know why you are so worried about people following scholars who are not marja, they are so many Shias in the Indian-Subcontinent who don't follow any marja and don't believe they should. And if you are worried about misguidance then please work towards getting 85% of Muslims towards the path of ahlul bayt.

I am sorry.

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You people are completely missing the point. These local scholars are not small time nobodies. They are representatives of the Maraja and that makes a difference. The maraja have said that Sayyid Fadlallah is not a Marja, it's not me who is saying it. I was actually speaking to the son of a well known scholar who was a very close friend of Sayyid Fadlallah's father. According to this scholar Sayyid Fadlallah declared himself to be a Mujtahid and Marja when he had no Ijaza. I am only telling you that because it comes from someone who is very close to their family.

I know the man has done a lot of good, I will even admit that he looks holy but that doesn't take away from the fact that his teachings are not all good. I personally wouldn't rule out the possibility that he was doing taqiyyah all this time and said things to unite the Muslims and throwing in a few very odd rulings (like the pornography one) to clearly show that his ijtihad is not valid. I am not here putting down his charity work I am talking about his ijtihad. We cannot judge a person's ijtihad based on his great charity work. And anyhow we are Shia Muslims, we know that it is possible for a scholar to do lots of good things but still be wrong in his teachings. We have many Sunnis/Christians and even atheists who have done lots of good work. Even an atheist like Bob Geldof has done good things for Africa, much more than most of us have done. If we want to praise the good work of Sayyid Fadlallah then so be it but lets not pretend that he was a qualified Marja or that his works were not full of mistakes.

This is not just about one historical event but a whole list of things.

(salam)

1: Your not a qualified mujahid to say a marja is not a marja.

2: one can claim their own ijtihad and ijazah he has by a list of marja's saying he is a mujahid and etc.

3: like ayatollah shirazi said in about the sayyid that there was a hate campaign against him!

4: if it was haram to use things haram when it is consider a LAST medical remedy for the disease then let you find me some words by "MARJA's" about morphine, alcohol and other haram things being used as permissible if as a medical remedy.

No matter if you agree or not, your still not qualified to openly say someone is not qualified, the amount of condolences and statements by other ayatollah's shows you that this man was seen as a mujahid, and a grate treasure to the community. and look and behold who is saying things against the sayyid - Israeli's. if it is not clear enough now, that ayatollah sayyid fadlullah was seen as a close person to hezbollah and they wanted to kill him and could not do so, so they set out fabrications and hate campaigns. then brother you should start looking with opened eyes and not closed ones.

perhaps that if he did taqqiya was to say he was not so close to hezbollah as he actually was!

after all his official site did say this " He experienced Islam in complete awareness of the responsibility that ought to be shouldered and the line of justice that ought to be followed. He was the mastermind who launched the resistance movements, which inspired from his thought the spirit of confrontation, opposition and steadfastness and were able to achieve big accomplishments and victories in Lebanon and Palestine and any position of Jihad [struggle]…"

(wasalam)

Edited by AlMuttaqi
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(salam)

^people do not like people when they speak truth on things recall how the prophet (pbuh) was treated by quraysh for speaking against their lies and fabrications and shirk. ayatollah fadlullah is seen as one who renovated.

(wasalam)

Edited by AlMuttaqi
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(salam)

^people do not like people when they speak truth on things recall how the prophet (pbuh) was treated by quraysh for speaking against their lies and fabrications and shirk. ayatollah fadlullah is seen as one who renovated.

(wasalam)

(salam)

I know which is why I said I will be the darkknight everyone hates.

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(salam)

Do not grieve much over it, the night may be dark but in the summers heat it has relief in temperature, it has an illuminated moon therein and within appears what is hidden behind the blue sky by day. just strive towards reaching heights of purity in yourself. some of these people will not listen and sometimes arguments can be misleading and fall to fallibility. as well as distressful.

(wasalam)

Edited by AlMuttaqi
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(salam)

Do not grieve much over it, the night may be dark but in the summers heat it has relief in temperature, it has an illuminated moon therein and within appears what is hidden behind the blue sky by day.

(wasalam)

Salam

Whom faced forgeforht and stopped him from teaching tawheed???? Whom lead it against him???? It was MEE MEE, I am the foundation of the Shirk of Ghulats on Shiachat...

Don't tell me not to grieve and no one tell me to take it easy...

wa salam

Edited by MysticKnight
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Salam all,

Those who are overly concerned with the validity of Fadlullah's status should take a good long look at themselves and worry about their own sins, and have respect for a great man who is now with his Lord. This great scholar will not be replaced...condolences.

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The lecture was given by Seyyid Ammar was on Sunday evening at Hyderi Islamic centre. Full of praise for Ayatollah Fadlallah.

And yet Sayed Ammar himself has taken apart SMH Fadhlullah's views on the burning door in a number of his lectures. It seems a bit odd, no?

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And yet Sayed Ammar himself has taken apart SMH Fadhlullah's views on the burning door in a number of his lectures. It seems a bit odd, no?

Why would it be odd? There is more to Islam than the burning door incident.

Anyway, it will be interesting to hear Syed Ammar's lecture to find out what exactly he said.

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Why would it be odd? There is more to Islam than the burning door incident.

Its odd that a person that has criticised SMH Fadhlullah on many issues, most importantly the burning door (which is the most important moment in the history of Islam) should then give a lecture praising him after he's died.

Would David Cameron give a lecture praising Kim Yong II or Ahmedinejad if they died? I think not.

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Its odd that a person that has criticised SMH Fadhlullah on many issues, most importantly the burning door (which is the most important moment in the history of Islam) should then give a lecture praising him after he's died.

Would David Cameron give a lecture praising Kim Yong II or Ahmedinejad if they died? I think not.

It would would depend on what the nature of the criticism was. If it was just a disagreement on certain issues, then that is fine, and is normal. However, if he was personally attacking Syed Fadlallah, then yes, it would be odd. Anyway, without having seen the lecture, it's difficult to draw too many conclusions.

I would be interested to know what your definition of the history of Islam is, in order to determine that the story of the burning door is the most important moment in its history, Because that seems very strange to me, to say the least.

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I would be interested to know what your definition of the history of Islam is, in order to determine that the story of the burning door is the most important moment in its history, Because that seems very strange to me, to say the least.

The reason why it is the most important moment is because it makes it clear as the light of day the people who were loyal to the Holy Prophet (pbuh) and those who appeared to be loyal but were anything but

But yes, it is difficult to comment without knowing exactly what the Sayed said.

Edited by Socrates
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The reason why it is the most important moment is because it makes it clear as the light of day the people who were loyal to the Holy Prophet (pbuh) and those who appeared to be loyal but were anything but

I would have thought the election of Abu Bakr had already made that pretty clear, although what happened later did further confirm it. However, even if we take what is in the Sunni books concerning what happened, there is still more than enough evidence to determine the true nature of certain individuals. The story of the door doesn't need to be true for that. In addition, as important as it is to know who was loyal to the prophet, and who wasn't, in my view that isn't the single most important thing in Islam.

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In addition, as important as it is to know who was loyal to the prophet, and who wasn't, in my view that isn't the single most important thing in Islam.

The loyalty to the Prophet (pbuh) and by extension the Ahlul Bayt (as) is the foundation of Islam (according to the Qur'an, hadith and common sense). Nothing could be more important than it.

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One of the channels from lebanon showed Sayed Ammar's lecture from london. He praised all his good works for Islam, his graduation in the period of great scholarship from Najaf Ashraf and his far sighted vision. On the incident of the door, he said even if there are differing opinions, there should never have been a smear campaign against him, rather there should be discussion with open-mindedness and respect.

Edited by janali
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On the incident of the door, he said even if there are differing opinions, there should never have been a smear campaign against him, rather there should be discussion with open-mindedness and respect.

Thank you brother. I agree with Syed Ammar 100%. This is how disagreements should be handled. Not by getting emotional and by smearing people.

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The loyalty to the Prophet (pbuh) and by extension the Ahlul Bayt (as) is the foundation of Islam (according to the Qur'an, hadith and common sense). Nothing could be more important than it.

I completely disagree with this. How can loyalty to the Prophet (pbuh) come before love and obedience to Allah (swt)? Loyalty to the Prophet (pbuh) and to the Ahlul Bayt (as) comes from obedience to Allah (swt), not the other way around. The very word Islam means submission(to Allah (swt)).

For argument's sake however, let's take what you say to be the foundation of Islam, and the incident of the door to be the most important moment in Islam's history. Logic should dictate that if someone doesn't follow the foundation of something, then he cannot really be said to follow it at all. How can someone call themselves a muslim if they don't know the foundation of Islam? Now, Sunnis don't recognise the incident of the door in the Shia form, and they don't think the one in their books is that big a deal. Neither do they recognise the proper position of the Ahlul Bayt (as). Therefore Sunnis aren't muslims.

Do you agree with this?

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I completely disagree with this. How can loyalty to the Prophet (pbuh) come before love and obedience to Allah (swt)? Loyalty to the Prophet (pbuh) and to the Ahlul Bayt (as) comes from obedience to Allah (swt), not the other way around. The very word Islam means submission(to Allah (swt)).

Loyalty to the Prophet and submission to Allah is the same thing. You can't have one without the other. But many people claim to submit to Allah yet they don't believe in the Prophet.

For argument's sake however, let's take what you say to be the foundation of Islam, and the incident of the door to be the most important moment in Islam's history. Logic should dictate that if someone doesn't follow the foundation of something, then he cannot really be said to follow it at all. How can someone call themselves a muslim if they don't know the foundation of Islam? Now, Sunnis don't recognise the incident of the door in the Shia form, and they don't think the one in their books is that big a deal. Neither do they recognise the proper position of the Ahlul Bayt (as). Therefore Sunnis aren't muslims.

Do you agree with this?

From him from Ibn Faddal from `Asim b. Humayd from Fudayl ar-Rassan from Abu Dawud from Abu `Abdillah al-Jadali. He said: Amir al-Mu’mineen `Ali b. Abi Talib ÕáæÇÊ Çááå Úáíå said to me: O Abu `Abdillah, shall I narrate to you the good deed that whoever comes with it is safe from alarm on the day of the resurrection, and the sin that whoever comes with it Allah will prostrate him upon his face in the Fire? I said: Yea. He said: The good deed is love of us, and the sin is hatred of us.

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Loyalty to the Prophet and submission to Allah is the same thing. You can't have one without the other.

Not at all. Someone could be loyal to the Prophet (pbuh) and not submit to Allah(swt). Loyalty and submission aren't the same thing. Even if they were, I believe the chain of thought that says you submit to Allah (swt) because you are loyal to the Prophet (pbuh), and he tells you to do so is deeply misguided.

But many people claim to submit to Allah yet they don't believe in the Prophet.

The key word being 'claim'.

From him from Ibn Faddal from `Asim b. Humayd from Fudayl ar-Rassan from Abu Dawud from Abu `Abdillah al-Jadali. He said: Amir al-Mu’mineen `Ali b. Abi Talib ÕáæÇÊ Çááå Úáíå said to me: O Abu `Abdillah, shall I narrate to you the good deed that whoever comes with it is safe from alarm on the day of the resurrection, and the sin that whoever comes with it Allah will prostrate him upon his face in the Fire? I said: Yea. He said: The good deed is love of us, and the sin is hatred of us.

So in other words, you do not consider Sunnis to be muslims, but you don't want to say it clearly.

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Not at all. Someone could be loyal to the Prophet (pbuh) and not submit to Allah(swt). Loyalty and submission aren't the same thing. Even if they were, I believe the chain of thought that says you submit to Allah (swt) because you are loyal to the Prophet (pbuh), and he tells you to do so is deeply misguided.

Khuzayma ibn Thabit al-Ansari (ra) entered into a debate going on between the Prophet (pbuh) and another companion. He learned that the Prophet (pbuh) had bought a camel from another person and now this person was refusing to honour the contract. The companion asked the Prophet (pbuh) whether he had any witnesses and he replied in the negative. Khuzayma stepped in and said, "O Messenger of Allah! You told us to believe in Allah, the prophets, the angels, the hereafter and we believed you even though we didn't see any of these things! How could we ask you for a witness over a petty camel?!" The Messenger of Allah (pbuh) presented Khuzayma as a witness and the other person was forced to honour his contract. From that day onwards, Khuzayma was known as "Dhu-Shahadatayn" (the one's whose testimony counted for two).

You believe in Allah through logic, but you submit to him because the Prophet (pbuh) said so. That's why you're a Muslim, and not a Christian, or Jew, or a pantheist or deist.

So in other words, you do not consider Sunnis to be muslims, but you don't want to say it clearly.

"The words of the Imam are the Imam of the words" - Imam Ali (as)

Edited by Socrates
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Its odd that a person that has criticised SMH Fadhlullah on many issues, most importantly the burning door (which is the most important moment in the history of Islam) should then give a lecture praising him after he's died.

Would David Cameron give a lecture praising Kim Yong II or Ahmedinejad if they died? I think not.

Very childish. What would this guy (whoever he is, Amar) say in regard to Fadlallah on his death? That he had disagreement with Ayatollah on 'burning door' issue and that is why he was a bad man? I don't know what kind of culture you follow, but from what I seen across the world people remember a deceased's good deeds and achievements while praying for him after his death, NOT that they had a few disagreements on this issue and that issue.

Maybe, if the issue of 'burning door' arises again, this guy may still have the same view and do not agree with Ayatollah Fadlallah's view on the specific matter.. But, that does not mean to ignore all great works Fadlallah did for Islam, for his country and community.

Same thing happened when Muntazeri died, many remembered his good works..not the other way around.

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You believe in Allah through logic, but you submit to him because the Prophet (pbuh) said so. That's why you're a Muslim, and not a Christian, or Jew, or a pantheist or deist.

No, I follow the Prophet (pbuh) because Allah says so, I don't submit to Allah because the Prophet (pbuh) tells me to. If the Prophet (pbuh) told me not to submit to Allah(swt) (naudhubillah) then I wouldn't listen to him. By the same token, if Allah(swt) told me not to follow the Prophet (pbuh), then I wouldn't. I'm surprised you can't see how wrong what you have just stated is.

I believe in Allah (swt) through logic, I submit to Him through logic, and I follow His messenger through logic. If I simply stop at believing in Allah(swt), then how am I supposed to know that I should listen to the Prophet (pbuh)? I follow Islam because it is the only religion that makes any logical sense to me. For the same reason I am a Shia and not a Sunni.

"The words of the Imam are the Imam of the words" - Imam Ali (as)

Just come out and say it. I don't know what you are afraid of. Is it against forum rules or something?

Edited by Haider Husayn
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No, I follow the Prophet (pbuh) because Allah says so, I don't submit to Allah because the Prophet (pbuh) tells me to. If the Prophet (pbuh) told me not to submit to Allah(swt) (naudhubillah) then I wouldn't listen to him. By the same token, if Allah(swt) told me not to follow the Prophet (pbuh), then I wouldn't. I'm surprised you can't see how wrong what you have just stated is.

How would you know how to submit to Allah without the Prophet (pbuh)? If the Prophet told you not to submit to Allah, he wouldn't be a prophet. Its pretty simple.

Just come out and say it. I don't know what you are afraid of. Is it against forum rules or something?

I'm not afraid of anything, but why do I need to say anything when the infallibles have already said it?

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Its odd that a person that has criticised SMH Fadhlullah on many issues, most importantly the burning door (which is the most important moment in the history of islam)

I saw a lecture by hujjat al islam dr shomali, he said that the most important event of not only islam but of humanity was the prophethood of Mohammad (saww) because every event led up to that, and everything after came as a result of it. But that might only be what they teach in Qom, I guess in Najaf they teach what you're saying?

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