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In the Name of God بسم الله
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wonderer

Thoughts (2010-2016) [ARCHIVE]

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This is all correct, but usually when people talk about pursuing happiness, they mean it from a selfish point of view.  Contentment is true happiness, not the state of being entertained which most worldly people call happiness.  

 

"A kind of unexpected, ineradicable childishness pervades our people; in direct opposition to what is best in us, our infallible practical common sense, we often behave with the utmost foolishness, with exactly the same foolishness as children, senselessly, wastefully, grandiosely, irresponsibly.and all that for the sake of some trivial entertainment."...which we call happiness.

 

...said Franz Kafka.

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Speaking of materialism, I'd love to have a room just like this one.

 

interior-furniture-green-silk-curtains-a

 

Except I want a sliding ladder directly on the book shelf, like they have in movies.  

Edited by notme

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Happiness is when your living in a  moment that you never want to end. Like when your in dua and you can feel God is pleased with you and you dont want to stop so you don't lose that feeling. Those moments are so hard to come by.

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This is all correct, but usually when people talk about pursuing happiness, they mean it from a selfish point of view.  Contentment is true happiness, not the state of being entertained which most worldly people call happiness.  

 

I think this is a better approach than saying that the pursuit of happiness is futile. There are different types and degrees of happiness. 

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Bro Muhammad Ali, 

 

In no way am I saying my opinion is set in stone or anything.. After all this is a 'thoughts' thread. The context behind it was the pursuit of Happiness in the material sense.. If we use the word happiness as part of contentment then of course it's a noble pursuit. Happiness isn't to be avoided or not sought after. I didn't mean that at all. I'm merely making the point; if we look at happiness and sadness in the purist emotional sense - they are equal emotions. They will come and go throughout life.

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Good article. In particular the word 'literally' has become a sort of misnomer that's more and more accepted due to widespread (mis)use. It won't be surprising if in a few years time it comes to mean 'figuratively' too, in spite of its actual meaning. We have a precedent for this.

 

Take decimate. It historically meant to kill one person in a group of ten as a warning to the rest. Later it came to mean to cut something in ten parts. Eg, when you cut a piece of meat in ten parts, you decimate it. But further on it changed to mean complete or great destruction. To decimate an army; a town decimated by plague etc.

 

There are other minor mistakes people make all the time but don't think much of it. Take everyone and every one. They can't be used interchangeably.

 

"Every one of us graduated in the year 2014," . 'Every one' means 'each person.'

 

"Everyone knows Khalid is a liar." every one in a group, present or not.

 

Likewise, everyday and every day, everything and every thing, anyone and any one etc.

 

The article mentions 'alot' which is wrong, and so is 'alright'. There's no word such as this. It is all right.

Edited by Marbles

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^ I never thought of the everyone/every one difference. We need to learn about this stuff in elementary school!

 

 

We used to, and I'm even not all that old. 

 

I was reading a book sample on my kindle yesterday that talked about the loss of classical education, and how much it harms an individual and society as a whole.  Right now I'm home schooling a middle school age child, and my daughter is going to be ready for kindergarten when she's just a few weeks short of five years, but not allowed to go due to her birth date being past the cutoff date.  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001NLKZSM/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1SNU8Y5779BU6&coliid=I88HLMD60QH8H

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We used to, and I'm even not all that old. 

 

I was reading a book sample on my kindle yesterday that talked about the loss of classical education, and how much it harms an individual and society as a whole.  Right now I'm home schooling a middle school age child, and my daughter is going to be ready for kindergarten when she's just a few weeks short of five years, but not allowed to go due to her birth date being past the cutoff date.  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001NLKZSM/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1SNU8Y5779BU6&coliid=I88HLMD60QH8H

I learned it as well, but the newer generation of teachers don't cover this material. Everything's about teaching to the test now. And apparently grammar isn't important enough to be on these tests. And I find it so weird that certain states and countries have cutoffs. I honestly don't see the point in having a child stay behind a year just because they were born later.

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I honestly don't see the point in having a child stay behind a year just because they were born later.

Nobody is better able to judge a child's readiness for school than the parents. My daughter is advanced in math skills, pretty much where she should be in language skills, has excellent hand-eye coordination, but not particularly mature for her age. I'm planning to do all that's in my power to make sure she doesn't get delayed just because she was born 3 weeks after the cutoff. If this means home schooling, that's what we're going to do.

Edited by notme

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Likewise, everyday and every dayeverything and every thinganyone and any one etc.

 

The article mentions 'alot' which is wrong, and so is 'alright'. There's no word such as this. It is all right.

 

Actually, alright is definitely a word.  I'm guessing it came about similar to how "albeit" somehow became a word.

 

But those are good points in general.  I think sometimes people make a similar mistake with "maybe" and "may be".  I suppose "may be" can be used interchangeably with "might be".  But "maybe" is more like "perhaps".

 

Edited by Bright

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Actually, alright is definitely a word.  I'm guessing it came about similar to how "albeit" somehow became a word.

 

But those are good points in general.  I think sometimes people make a similar mistake with "maybe" and "may be".  I suppose "may be" can be used interchangeably with "might be".  But "maybe" is more like "perhaps".

 

Ha, well this is bizarre... apparently alright may technically not be a word (not yet, at least):

www.grammarist.com/usage/all-right-alright/

 

But I've seen it used so often, and I think it's more useful than a word like "altogether":

www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/all-right-versus-alright

 

The first link cites this New York Times headline as an example of a high-end publication sticking with "all right":

"The Banks Are Not All Right"

 

But as someone in the comments points out, that wording creates ambiguity... it could be read as "The banks are not all correct".  The paper probably liked the play on words, but still, for everyday usage, it's an example of how "alright" fills a useful role.

 

I find it so bizarre though, because I've seen "alright" used in so many publications.  The first link also mentions that the 2 wordings have an equal number of Google results, so it seems inevitable that it will officially become a word at some point.  And the second link mentions a style guide that says:

"“all right” as two words and “alright” as one word have two distinct meanings."

 

It sounds like there's also a British vs American English difference here, with alright being more alright with Americans.  Well, I'm still going to keep doing my part for its acceptance, by using alright when possible.  :P

 

 

What other secrets do you know, Marbles?  :!!!:

 

The decimate explanation is also interesting.

Edited by Bright

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what does 777 mean?

 

The number 7 is often considered lucky in Western countries... I think part of it might be that it's a nice-looking/simple number visually.

 

The Chinese seem to like the number 8 because it visually looks like a sideways infinity symbol.  It apparently also sounds like their word for prosperity or wealth.

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Actually, alright is definitely a word.  I'm guessing it came about similar to how "albeit" somehow became a word.

 

'Alright' is a corruption of 'all right' and has only become a word in recent usage. But it's not admitted into the dictionaries. So if you search for 'alright' online, you will get the meanings of 'all right.'

 

'Albeit' is a very old, even obsolete, word; I don't know its etymology.

 

I think sometimes people make a similar mistake with "maybe" and "may be".  I suppose "may be" can be used interchangeably with "might be".  But "maybe" is more like "perhaps".

 

Yes, correct on both counts.

 

It's acceptable to use 'may be' and 'might be' interchangeably in contemporary practice but in the past the tense form was the simple determinant of which term you'd use. But there are still sentences, which I can't readily think of, where we should only use 'might be' because to use 'may be' makes them odd and ruins their tenses.

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Middle English, "although it be". I still use albeit, but I'm very old, perhaps even obsolete. :)

 

Nooo, just refined surely =D

'Alright' is a corruption of 'all right' and has only become a word in recent usage. But it's not admitted into the dictionaries. So if you search for 'alright' online, you will get the meanings of 'all right.'

 

'Albeit' is a very old, even obsolete, word; I don't know its etymology.

 

 

Yes, correct on both counts.

 

It's acceptable to use 'may be' and 'might be' interchangeably in contemporary practice but in the past the tense form was the simple determinant of which term you'd use. But there are still sentences, which I can't readily think of, where we should only use 'might be' because to use 'may be' makes them odd and ruins their tenses.

 

As our resident polyglot, i think its high time you had a language class on here Marbs. You could teach us an idiom from a different language each day, or how to say the same phrase in different languages, or something equally fun post-73242-0-74182500-1342726119.jpg

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(salam)

 

albeit:  conjunction, Although. [Middle English: al be it, "let it be entirely (that)" ]

 

Paraphrase of an exempli gratia: Many sentences and phrases continue with cautionary conjunctions, albeit "although" 'is more natural'.

 

Gosh, I ain't heered albeit in decades.

 

 

Added:

Here's what I found from Middle English texts"

 

" ...albeit..... ,yet....."   sentence construction

 

"... albeit... , it hath(has) ..."     

 

I'll bet albeit isn't all a bite into our language, yet still remembered.  :dry:

 

 

Edited by hasanhh

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Bro everyone is too lazy to read your links. Can you give us the lazy person's summary?

I myself have to read him, I heard a few things about that figure, and I wanted to have some insight about him. He, according to my friend, challenges many

 

commonly held shia beliefs.

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