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DoubleAgent4

Nowruz

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There is a hadith by the 6th Holy Imam AS, and he would not start a conversation about Norouz with his companion if it was nonsense, astaghfirullah. I heard that there is a hadith from Imam Ali AS explaining to his companion(s) that Norouz is a day that Arabs abandoned and Farsi people (meaning Salman Farsi's people) kept it. If Norouz was bad, Imam Ali AS could have said it was haram and rejected it.

Sister it's not that straight forward. There are some ahadith which are actually against the celebration of nawroz.

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(salam)

1: do we have sahih haidth both in support and in non-support of nowruz?

If so then

2: what is the sunni view on nowruz? in the time of our imams (as)

(wasalam)

Edited by AlMuttaqi

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(salam)

1: do we have sahih haidth both in support and in non-support of nowruz?

If so then

2: what is the sunni view on nowruz? in the time of our imams (as)

(wasalam)

It's been recently discussed, dissected and analyzed in this thread using many evidences (Qur'an, Sunnah, Traditions of the Prophets and Hadiths-from both schools, Sunni & Shia) along with basic logic.

Edited by Glow

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It's been recently discussed, dissected and analyzed in this thread using many evidences (Qur'an, Sunnah, Traditions of the Prophets and Hadiths-from both schools, Sunni & Shia) along with basic logic.

http://www.shiachat....am/page__st__25

(salam)

what we should see is a in-dept examination by someone who has analyzed every hadith contained in shia books of hadith perttianing to this matter.

(wasalam)

Edited by AlMuttaqi

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(salam)

what we should see is a in-dept examination by someone who has analyzed every hadith contained in shia books of hadith perttianing to this matter.

(wasalam)

Was the Qur'an and the Traditions of the Prophet along with the crystal clear straight forward logic presented not enough ?

I think the answer has been made very clear there from many angles.

There is actually more evidence presented then needed to debunk the assumption.

Edited by Glow

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some of my fondest memories are from Nowroz and Eid and I am sure that I am not alone.

They both thus remain as vibrant social rituals.

The flower used to bloom, the anticipation of people, the big function, the tv programs,

the day of..... its more than just a celebration... its so much more.

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some of my fondest memories are from Nowroz and Eid and I am sure that I am not alone.

They both thus remain as vibrant social rituals.

The flower used to bloom, the anticipation of people, the big function, the tv programs,

the day of..... its more than just a celebration... its so much more.

ive only been in Iran for one eid nowruz and for the rest i have been in usa but that 1 eid was so great and left me so many memories and thats probably y i love nowruz so much now. I wish everyday could be eid nowruz!

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There were some people in here that were bashing Glow with a baseball bat, just because he had different responses, as well as the fact that he's a Sunni Muslim.

Let me clear this up, and let me clear this up in an open minded manner.

First of all, Nowruz has nothing to do with Islam, at all. It's a cultural celebration.

Is it permissible, under Islamic laws, to celebrate? (According to Islamic laws, there's no harm, because there's no drinking or wild parties that lead to sinful activities, therefore it's halal, unless some moron makes it into some Westernized party).

Just because the dates of Nowruz might be coincidentally appearing around Islamic (religious) events, doesn't make it Islamic. That's just coincidental, so lets not try to muddy different facts.

Another thing that isn't Islamic, but we Shiites do, is talk to the dead, dream about the dead, spend time and money on ceremonies and caskets, and really put a lot of emphasis on the deceased i general.

Even this, is not considered to be Islamic at all. Just because some Sunni Sufi groups in Pakistan, perform the same rituals, Shiites do, does not make it any more, or less Islamic.

These same Sunni Sufis, much like the Shiites, are influenced by the Persian empire. Now are these things halal? This depends on the school of thought.

Because Shiites are influenced by the Persian Empire, Persian values, maybe even Zoroastrian ones, may come to play.

According to Sunni beliefs (I believe, both Hanafi and Shafi, schools of thoughts agree on this, I don't know about the Malikis), it is makruh and maybe even possibly haram, to spend too much time and money on the dead.

The reasoning? The dead are long gone. By putting emphasis on them, by spending money on expensive caskets, ceremonies, foods, and other time and money consuming events, according to the Sunni narratives, you are putting a great deal of spiritual stress on their backs, because they are not able to compensate the money and time spent on them. In other words, you are humiliating them in a spiritual manner, because they realize they cannot give back to the living.

So my conclusion is, when it comes to Nowruz, it should be permissible, because there's no drinking or sex parties, involved (If there are, then it would be haram).

When it comes to the Shiite and Sufi tradition of spending excessive time and money, on the dead, this is a cultural influence that interfered Islamic beliefs. It should involve some careful thought and consideration on the required amount of time and money spent on the deceased.

As a Shiite Muslim, if you want to speak, dream, or serve the dead, it is up to you. Just don't spend a lot of time and money, to the point, where you will become physically ill and hurt yourself in the process both spiritually, emotionally, and physically, and don't excessive amounts of money or time, to the point where the spirits of the deceased, become embarrassed and feels guilty for his death. So I agree with Sunni Muslims on this matter, their argument, is a rather strong and logical one.

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It's never too late :). Better now than never.

lol I wanted to add.

There are people who are now saying that Nowruz should be called an "Eastern New Year's"

Because non-Farsi speaking countries celebrate it as well.

I guess they forget that the Iranian culture has influenced Shiite Muslims as well as those that were associated with the Persian Empire.

Nowruzetan Piroz.

Edited by ShiaBen

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It's never too late :). Better now than never.

lol I wanted to add.

There are people who are now saying that Nowruz should be called an "Eastern New Year's"

Because non-Farsi speaking countries celebrate it as well.

I guess they forget that the Iranian culture has influenced Shiite Muslims as well as those that were associated with the Persian Empire.

Nowruzetan Piroz.

What are some of the Non-Farsi Speaking countries and areas that celebrate Nowruz

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What are some of the Non-Farsi Speaking countries and areas that celebrate Nowruz

The turkic countries: Kyrgizstan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan

Uzbekistan: they have historic persian influence, and still have native persian speakers in Bukhara (former ancient persian city), and other areas. The turkic uzbeks also celebrate it.

Turkey also some what. Nowruz pronounced Novruz in Turkish and turkic languages, is celebrated there. It's celebrated similarly, it's acknowledged that it's from persian, but some countries have developed some of their own ways of celebrating, and even some of their own historic tales (could be made up, some appear to be made up stories) it's pretty much similar though.

Azerbaijan: celebrated the same way as in Iran.

Farsi countries: Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Iran, celebrate it pretty much the same way as well. It's also a national holiday in the turkic countries, including Turkey most recently.

Kurdistan: All kurds celebrate Nowruz, it's also a big part of kurdish culture.

ws

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Don't quote me at all on this.

But I believe there is a group in Kashmir that celebrate it (maybe they are Shiite Muslims or Sufis).

And there is also a Shiite Sufi group in Kosovo and Albania that celebrate it.

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While US president Obama's 2011-Nawroz message called upon people of Iran to start 'unrest' and 'chaos' in Iran, Iranian Supreme Leader met with the heads of states and asked for peace, progress, prayers and wellness of people of the region and the world.

I hope to see people of Bahrain, Yemen, Libya, Saudi, UAE free of occupation forces, free of foreign installed dictators, free of atheist and Salafi forces this year, inshallah! Those who turned the green-fresh spring of this new year into pools of blood in Bahrain, Yemen, and Libya will have no choice but to face GOD's justice and face the consequences. God is with the oppressed people.

Ayatollah Khamenei with heads of States Part-1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiEC6NjsGt4

Ayatollah Khamenei with heads of States Part-2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IxONlFDHaQ

Ayatollah Khamenei with heads of States Part-3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfepvCNsX7Q

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