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In the Name of God بسم الله

Vanishing Liberties

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Criticism of Israeli atrocities will be "anti-semitic hate speech"

Shades of the Bolsheviks, recall Stalin had the DEATH PENALTY for possession of The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion

See also: Exempting Israel from Criticism, by Paul Craig Roberts

Vanishing Liberties

If the seemingly unending wars in Iraq and Afghanistan ever do come to a close and a new war with Iran, Somalia, or Sudan can somehow be avoided, the most serious long term damage from the conflicts will be to the fundamental freedoms that Americans have cherished for more than two hundred years. The erosion of America’s liberties has been driven by fear of terrorism but it is enabled by leaps in technology coupled with new legislation and a police state mentality that have made every citizen a target. Hate crimes and laws targeting the internet provide a framework that relies on advanced monitoring technology to criminalize behavior that would have been considered off limits for privacy reasons ten years ago.

The National Security Agency can monitor every phone call made in the United States and quite likely every e-mail. European security agencies have the same capabilities and have gone far down the road of legitimizing state intrusion into private activities, limiting free speech and free association. In Britain, most cities and highways are now monitored by CCTV cameras and the police have begun to use aerial drones to observe and record demonstrations of groups considered to be extreme...

New legislation in Germany will require all internet users to be licensed with a backtracking feature that will enable the government to determine where any internet transmission originated. The new regulations will require all users to have a tamper proof internet ID and will be enforced by special police. All telecommunications data, to include both internet and telephone, is already retained by the German service providers for six months, a law that has been in effect since 2008. The government can obtain the stored information by court order. It is particularly interesting to note what German politicians and officials said in support of the new legislation. One commented that it is necessary to stop the internet from becoming a "lawless chaos room." Another described the internet as a "source of criminality, terrorism, and much similar filth." Yet another said "What is illegal offline is also illegal online."

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Criticism of Israeli atrocities will be "anti-semitic hate speech"

Shades of the Bolsheviks, recall Stalin had the DEATH PENALTY for possession of The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion

See also: Exempting Israel from Criticism, by Paul Craig Roberts

Vanishing Liberties

So you inferring that the snooping is now to prevent "anti-semetic speech"?

What about the Nokia Siemens technology Iran has and used recently? and also

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2009/07/2009720132832678525.html

Iran has passed a new internet law that experts fear will make information on internet users more readily available to the authorities.

Press TV, a news channel funded by the Iranian government, said on Monday that Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the country's president, has issued an order for the implementation of the law.

According to Press TV, the cyber law would provide internet users with "more security", as internet service providers are required to save all data sent and received by their clients for at least three months.

But critics of the legislation say the stored data would enable the authorities to monitor internet users, including anonymous bloggers opposed to the regime in the Islamic republic.

'Censorship tool'

Rob Faris, a research director at the Harvard University's Berkman Centre, told Al Jazeera that the new law could serve as an additional tool for the authorities to keep an eye on cyberspace.

"Given how internet savvy the young Iranians are and the help they are getting from Iranian expats, whatever law Ahmadinejad passes, there will be a way round it"

Potkin Azarmehr, Iranian blogger

"For blogs that include restricted content, this legislation could give authorities one more way to go after them, though this doesn't seem needed.

"The government has not been constrained in the past by a lack of legal instruments."

But the government insists the law is aimed at reducing cyber crimes and providing surfers with more security in cyberspace.

Qorban-Ali Dorri-Najafabadi, the prosecutor general, said on Sunday that the law would protect the rights of the people and prevent violation of their privacy in cyberspace.

Faris agreed that the law could help tackle pornography and other "forbidden" content hosted within Iran.

"If this legislation is indeed used to prevent fraud and privacy violations, this could be helpful." he said.

Post-poll turmoil

The law comes amid continuing political tensions in Iran following a disputed presidential election on June 12.

The election, which saw Ahmadinejad returned to office for a second-term by a wide margin, tirggered widespread protests prompting the government in Tehran to severely restrict public access to the internet.

Social networking sites, such as Facebook, that enable people to communicate were blocked and mobile phone services disrupted during the height of the protests.

Reporters Without Borders, the Paris-based media censorship watchdog, has said the Iranian government is "aware of the growing influence of weblogs and is trying to restrict them by filtering sites that host them and set them up".

However, Potkin Azarmehr, an Iranian blogger based in London, said the plan to censor the internet might not work.

"Given how internet savvy the young Iranians are and the help they are getting from Iranian expats, whatever law Ahmadinejad passes, there will be a way round it," he said.

Edited by Irishman
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