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In the Name of God بسم الله

Christians that support Hezbollah

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I was curious to know to those of you that heard from relatives during the Lebanese and Arab-Israeli wars. While the majority of the Christians in the war fought on the side of Israel, I heard that the Christians like Michel Aoun, that came from mixed Christian-Muslim villages that had higher numbers of Muslims, than cities that were strictly 100% Christian inhabited, tended to side with Muslims for a unified Lebanon.

Does this tend to be true??? If you were to compare a Christian from a strictly Christian inhabited neighborhood in Lebanon, compared to a Maronite from Southern Lebanon, or a strictly Muslim inhabited area. And can the same be true for the areas that have an equal proportion of Christians and Muslims, tend to support the Muslims??

There was a video years ago on youtube. A Greek orthodox or a Maronite woman I believe, I think she was from South Lebanon. She was a strong supporter of Hezbollah, and even put a huge flag next to her couch, and had some posters. It was a 1 minute video, and it was pretty straightforward and talked about how Israel will destroy any Lebanese be it Christian, Muslim, Druze etc., unfortunately I believe some anti-Hezbollah, anti-Muslim in general, Christians and other morons on youtube flagged it to prevent people from realizing there are Christians that are for a non-Western backed Lebanon.

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About half of the Maronite population inside Lebanon supports Aoun's Free Patriotic Movement, which is allied to Hezbollah. Whether or not you want to label these people pro-Hezbollah or not, they are very much allied to the party. Both parties share common objectives. In fact, much of Aoun's support base comes from almost entirely Christian voter districts such as Matn and Keserwan. Jbeil and Jezzine also support Aoun and have Christian majorities, even though there are large Shi'a minorities in these regions.

From what I have seen, the regions that are mixed with Shi'a Muslims and Maronites (or Christians, in general) tend to vote in favour of Aoun and Hezbollah. This is true in Jbeil, Ba'abda, Jezzine, Zahrani and Bint Jbeil, among others. Whatever the case may be, Hezbollah is seen to be a legitimate political force within Lebanon. It is recognized by all. And although you might not see Hezbollah flags being waved in places like Keserwan or Jbeil, you will see the flags of their allies. Franjieh's Marada movement is also allied to Hezbollah and Aoun. He won all of the seats in the northern Maronite district of Zgharta. Hezbollah also has allies from the Armenian community.

There are Christian areas and districts that have hostility toward Hezbollah, Muslims and mixing in general. Bcharre is one of these places. It is the capital of Geagea's Lebanese Forces and is the most homogenous region in the country. This is also the case among other Christian towns and villages in Mount Lebanon and the North.

There is something valid to your hypothesis, but it is more complicated than this. Lebanon is a deeply feudal society. The people will do what their leaders tell them to do. Take a look at Junblatt's Druze in Aley and Chouf. They support the politician regardless of his place along the political divide.

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You know a lot about Lebanon, it's a shame the [Edited Out] Israelis bombed Beirut. They always ruin everything. Sooner or later, they will get their just desserts.

I hope the Shia and Sunni can find a way to unite, and slowly remove the Christians who back the Western forces. Then Lebanon will eventually become a united country without foreign forces occupying it. I heard the Christian population shrunk from 35% of Lebanon, to being 18-20% of Lebanon, which gives a lot of hopes to the Shias and Sunnis, in having more rights in the govt.

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You know a lot about Lebanon, it's a shame the [Edited Out] Israelis bombed Beirut. They always ruin everything. Sooner or later, they will get their just desserts.

I hope the Shia and Sunni can find a way to unite, and slowly remove the Christians who back the Western forces. Then Lebanon will eventually become a united country without foreign forces occupying it. I heard the Christian population shrunk from 35% of Lebanon, to being 18-20% of Lebanon, which gives a lot of hopes to the Shias and Sunnis, in having more rights in the govt.

politically speaking the worst enemy shia's have are the sunni's.

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politically speaking the worst enemy shia's have are the sunni's.

Well brother, your 100% right about that, I don't disagree.

Well for Lebanese Shia it's a fight between both. Western back Sunnis like Hariri, and the state of Israel.

But for Shias in general, I think Sunnis are the largest and primary threat. They attack Shias in several countries like Pakistan, Saudi, Bahrain, Iraq, and Turkey.

They also are the largest population that poses a threat to Shias. But my brother you have to realize something, I think as Shias we have done a good job so far in some situations.

Benazir Bhutto, and the Assad family, are both from Shia backgrounds, and they have gone to high levels. While Pakistan is not stable, Syria seems to be doing a great job. Assad and the 15% Alevi are pretty clever and are able to outsmart the close to 80% Sunni population that wants to take over. I just hope Syria doesn't fall and elect a Sunni leader that will split it's relations with Iran, I think that would be really bad.

I think once Iran can reach it's goals, it can help influence the regions in the middleast a bit more, and help bring about a positive atmosphere.

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Well brother, your 100% right about that, I don't disagree.

Well for Lebanese Shia it's a fight between both. Western back Sunnis like Hariri, and the state of Israel.

But for Shias in general, I think Sunnis are the largest and primary threat. They attack Shias in several countries like Pakistan, Saudi, Bahrain, Iraq, and Turkey.

They also are the largest population that poses a threat to Shias. But my brother you have to realize something, I think as Shias we have done a good job so far in some situations.

Benazir Bhutto, and the Assad family, are both from Shia backgrounds, and they have gone to high levels. While Pakistan is not stable, Syria seems to be doing a great job. Assad and the 15% Alevi are pretty clever and are able to outsmart the close to 80% Sunni population that wants to take over. I just hope Syria doesn't fall and elect a Sunni leader that will split it's relations with Iran, I think that would be really bad.

I think once Iran can reach it's goals, it can help influence the regions in the middleast a bit more, and help bring about a positive atmosphere.

assad family is nusairi. So, nusairi are shias? Ask Qa'im. He says the alevis are converting to Sunni. So that means Syria will soon be

80+ 15 = 95 % Sunni :)

the left over 5% are mostly christian/druze

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Not sure what you mean, do you mean that the Alevi faith is dying out?? Sure the country will eventually have a Sunni president, but I think it will be awhile for now (Thank God not now :D).

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^ Alevis and Allawis are not the same. The former is an ethno-religious group in Turkey and the latter is a closed faith in Syria. Both groups have Shi'a elements in them, but are not Shi'a Muslims in the way we understand. For the Alevis, it is difficult to ascertain exactly what their beliefs are, since they do not have any central doctrine or authority. Many Alevis are secular humanists. Others practice ghuluw (exaggeration). Alevism is more of an identity in Turkey. It has a loose belief structure that is hard to identify. Some of them may in fact be Shi'a. However, they don't practice the articles of faith like the Shi'a and Sunni. They are heavily influenced by Sufism and even Sunnism to a lesser degree.

The Allawis are the same. Their religion is kept secret, much like the Druze in Lebanon. They don't allow converts. It is widely believed that they do in fact worship Imam Ali as a deity, although there is disagreement about this among Allawis. Again, we can't go to the source of their religion because their doctrine is kept secret. I have talked to Allawis who indeed worship Ali, believe that Gabriel made a mistake in delivering the message and believe that Ali created Muhammed from light. But since over 90% of their adherents don't have access to their religious scripture, many are becoming absorbed by Sunni Islam and to a lesser extent Shi'a Islam. The Allawi belief system is a puzzle. Nevertheless, they represent an identity, much like the Alevis. A Allawi may indeed practice Sunni Islam and still consider himself a Allawi.

Edited by asphyxiated
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You know a lot about Lebanon, it's a shame the [Edited Out] Israelis bombed Beirut. They always ruin everything. Sooner or later, they will get their just desserts.

I hope the Shia and Sunni can find a way to unite, and slowly remove the Christians who back the Western forces. Then Lebanon will eventually become a united country without foreign forces occupying it. I heard the Christian population shrunk from 35% of Lebanon, to being 18-20% of Lebanon, which gives a lot of hopes to the Shias and Sunnis, in having more rights in the govt.

What is a shame is your naked racism, and how you support the ethnic cleansing of non-muslims out of Lebanon.

Do you support it elsewhere, when muslims are being expelled? How about if the West expelled all muslims - would you support that too?

And I laughed at your comment about how you support Assad's dictatorship in Syria - I guess in your mind a dictatorship and oppression is perfectly acceptable, but only if you support the regime.

And lastly, you mention "once Iran reaches it's goals" - what goals are those, please tell us? Could it be nuclear weapons development?

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What is a shame is your naked racism, and how you support the ethnic cleansing of non-muslims out of Lebanon.

Do you support it elsewhere, when muslims are being expelled? How about if the West expelled all muslims - would you support that too?

And I laughed at your comment about how you support Assad's dictatorship in Syria - I guess in your mind a dictatorship and oppression is perfectly acceptable, but only if you support the regime.

And lastly, you mention "once Iran reaches it's goals" - what goals are those, please tell us? Could it be nuclear weapons development?

I never promoted ethnic cleansing, I was referring to the Christians that want to supress Muslims, obviously you can't read.

Well, Assad's dictatorship seems great, apparently this same dictatorship prevented Lebanon from getting crushed even more by Israel, as well as crushing the wahabis.

Well if Iran does develop nuclear weapons, I hope it uses them to wipe people like you off the planet. :D People like you who want to see a middleast that is continually suppressed by the West. Apparently you are another moron who still believes they are developing weapons. People like you who want to see Iran destroyed, and not to help the stability of the middleast.

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^ Alevis and Allawis are not the same. The former is an ethno-religious group in Turkey and the latter is a closed faith in Syria. Both groups have Shi'a elements in them, but are not Shi'a Muslims in the way we understand. For the Alevis, it is difficult to ascertain exactly what their beliefs are, since they do not have any central doctrine or authority. Many Alevis are secular humanists. Others practice ghuluw (exaggeration). Alevism is more of an identity in Turkey. It has a loose belief structure that is hard to identify. Some of them may in fact be Shi'a. However, they don't practice the articles of faith like the Shi'a and Sunni. They are heavily influenced by Sufism and even Sunnism to a lesser degree.

The Allawis are the same. Their religion is kept secret, much like the Druze in Lebanon. They don't allow converts. It is widely believed that they do in fact worship Imam Ali as a deity, although there is disagreement about this among Allawis. Again, we can't go to the source of their religion because their doctrine is kept secret. I have talked to Allawis who indeed worship Ali, believe that Gabriel made a mistake in delivering the message and believe that Ali created Muhammed from light. But since over 90% of their adherents don't have access to their religious scripture, many are becoming absorbed by Sunni Islam and to a lesser extent Shi'a Islam. The Allawi belief system is a puzzle. Nevertheless, they represent an identity, much like the Alevis. A Allawi may indeed practice Sunni Islam and still consider himself a Allawi.

Sorry typing mistake, I mix up the name sometimes, hmm Assad for some reason doesn't seem like he has the typical Sunni mentality. I still see him as being separate from the rest of the Sunnis for some reason. He is also secular, so for him I don't think he sees a big deal with this Sunni/Shia thing. I think his Alawi identity might have made him an independent thinker, and to distant himself from Sunni/Shia views, and to just identify himself as a Muslim.

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  • 2 weeks later...
You know a lot about Lebanon, it's a shame the [Edited Out] Israelis bombed Beirut. They always ruin everything. Sooner or later, they will get their just desserts.

I hope the Shia and Sunni can find a way to unite, and slowly remove the Christians who back the Western forces. Then Lebanon will eventually become a united country without foreign forces occupying it. I heard the Christian population shrunk from 35% of Lebanon, to being 18-20% of Lebanon, which gives a lot of hopes to the Shias and Sunnis, in having more rights in the govt.

Should people in the US slowly remove the Muslims who dont back the US troops in Iraq and Afghanistan?. If Christians in Lebanon chose not to back Hezbullah, then that is their right, they should not be forced out of Lebanon for that. If they feel that Hezbullah initiated the act which started the war, and are not happy about Hezbullah bringing Lebanon into a war with the Israelis, then that should be their personal choice to make.

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Wrong, you are completely changing what I said. The Christians like Gemayel tried to bring dictatorship by aligning themselves with the west, to supress Muslims and side with the Israelis. So are you saying, the Christians and Israelis, should help promote destruction in Lebanon??? Do you even know anything about Gemayel and the atrocities committed against the Muslims of Lebanon??? If you knew, then you would realize if these Christian Maronites respect Lebanon, they should think 2x, about trying to harm the Muslim population, and not side with the forces that want to destroy Lebanon, like the West and Israel.

Now, I'm not saying they should be forced to side with the Brothers of Islam, Hezbollah, Hamas or any other political and military organization, but if they don't agree with these groups, they should refrain from selecting sides that are destructive (Israel) and remain neutral or pick a side that will not come into serious conflict or battles with Hezbollah, but by picking sides, they have automatically decided to seal their fate, so if they get in the way of Hezbollah or any other group, then it's their fate that lies in their own hands.

Edited by ShiaBen
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