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In the Name of God بسم الله

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Mourners remember Muslim soldier who died in Afghanistan

2nd Lt. Mohsin Naqvi one of four killed by roadside bomb

By SCOTT WALDMAN, Staff writer

Last updated: 3:46 p.m., Monday, September 22, 2008

COLONIE -- Mohsin Naqvi, a Muslim who joined the Army after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks and then died in an Afghanistan roadside bombing last week, was mourned by more than 100 people at a Central Avenue mosque today.

Male mourners left the prayer room at the al-Fatima Islamic Center about 20 minutes before the start of the 1 p.m. ceremony so that the female members of the mosque could pay respects to Naqvi, who was 26 years old.

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The men gathered in the hall and bowed their heads in silence as wailing could be heard through the closed doors of the prayer room. Some of the women chanted Naqvi's first name.

Naqvi joined the Army shortly after the terror attacks and hoped to bridge the divide between America and the Muslim world, friends and relatives say

"Our message is we have chosen this country. We are going to live here. We are going to die here. We are going to contribute in every respect," said Haider Khwaja, the mosque's vice president.

"He has sacrificed his life for the country."

Naqvi was among four U.S. Army soldiers killed Sept. 17 when a roadside bomb exploded near their patrol in eastern Afghanistan. He died during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

Naqvi grew up near Newburgh. He was born in Pakistan and came to the U.S. as a young child. The second lieutenant had joined the Army Reserve near Newburgh days after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and used his language skills to communicate with Afghans and reassure them about American intentions.

His wife, Raazia, lives with his sister, Tasneem Ali, in Mechanicville.

Six soldiers carried Naqvi's coffin into the mosque this afternoon as mourners filed in.

Following Muslim tradition, the soldiers all removed their shoes before carrying Naqvi's casket into the al-Fatima Islamic Center.

Once the casket was placed inside the mosque, Naqvi's brother, Hassan, 18, cried and kneeled before the coffin. The University at Albany pre-med student held his brother's military identification tags in his hands.

"He was so full of energy, so happy. I have not seen people so happy, laughing all the time," family friend and mosque President Imdad Imam said, describing Naqvi and his wife, Raazia, at their wedding three months ago.

Naqvi was deployed the next day. His funeral is being held at the same mosque where he was married.

Naqvi graduated from Newburgh Free Academy and was a prominent member of the Mid-Hudson Islamic Association. His death comes during a spike in violence in Afghanistan, where the U.S. has sustained 122 deaths in 2008, more than any year since the U.S. first invaded in 2001.

Naqvi was buried in Evergreen Memorial Park in Colonie.

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(Hassan Naqvi, right, is comforted by a family member as he listens to Iman Hashim Raza, left, say a prayer over the body of his brother Mohsin Naqvi )

Mourners picked up the coffin from the back of the hearse and carried it 50 yards to the grave. Following Muslim custom, they sat it down three times and passed it along the line of men.

Women sobbed as the soldier was carried to them. Soldiers fired a 21-gun salute and handed a folded American flag to Naqvi's widow.

Men reached inside the coffin to clutch the shrouded body and pray.

Family members grabbed handfuls of dirt to throw on the coffin and mourners picked up shovels to scoop up the earth.

They clutched each other as the grave was covered.

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Mourners pray for fallen soldier Mohsin Naqvi at his funeral ceremony at al-Fatima Islamic Center in Colonie on Monday, Sept. 22.

prayer led by Imam Hashim Raza Ghadiri (From London)

(Skip Dickstein / Times Union)

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Hassan Naqvi, brother of fallen soldier Mohsin Naqvi, is overcome with emotion before the funeral ceremony at al-Fatima Islamic Center in Colonie on Monday, Sept. 22 (Skip Dickstein / Times Union)

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The coffin carrying the body of Mohsin Naqvi is carried by a U.S. Army color guard from the al-Fatima Islamic Center in Colonie following Naqvi's funeral on Monday, Sept. 22. (Skip Dickstein / Times Union)

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There's no doubt people will read this story with a strong sense of irony but those who will call him bad names for serving in US army should watch!

He was an American and his interests as an American and as well as a Muslim laid with his own country.

Edited by Jibran Haider
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He died fighting for the enemy of the muslims in a time where muslims from all over the world have called for a jihad against the people he died fighting for.

There are two ways to gaurentee yourself a ticket to hell in Islam... committing suicide, and being a munafiq (betrayer).

He died fighting mujahideen in Afghanistan, as far as I'm concerned, if you betray your faith in war then you don't deserve to call yourself a muslim.

I'm sorry to say, but this is the ugly truth, I'm not going to pretend to feel sorry for him, it's REALITY and it is ISLAMIC.

May Allah have mercy on his soul, I believe that is all we can say.

Edited by Peli
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What exactly does it mean that he joined the army to "bridge the divide between America and the Muslim world"? Why did he have to join the army to do that?

And what does it mean he was with the Afghans to "reassure them about American intentions"? What did he think they were?

But nonetheless, he died in what he thought was right, let Allah hope his intentions were good.

Edited by Shia Engineer
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salamz

im not tryn to b scum ye

but he died fightn for america ye??? who does all dat dey do in afghanistan, and iraq and who supports the Zionist state and who is against russia wher all dey tryn to do is protect south ossetia

and how did Bush become president again??

so wat was he tryn to bridge between muslims and the west??

lik its true he loved his country, i love my country australia (mostly) but the government is different to the majority of the ppl of sydney. almost everyone knws its a bull[Edited Out] war here in sydney

contribute in every respect??? even if it means a haram war?? for a government dat is so corrupt?? whos military ppl rape n kill wen dey can get away with it?? ya dude we r young americans fightng for our country and the freedom of others...coz we gta put our noses in everythn.... rock on,totally ye bro alright..under the pressure of war u break....al d suicide n [Edited Out] dats goin on

these wars r so privatised dat ppl r makn so much money behind the scenes.

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I feel sorry for him that he died fighting for the oppressors and occupiers.

I'm not convinced that it is as simple as that. He aligned himself with one oppressor to fight another. I get the feeling his intentions were pure, though he may or may not have made the right decision. May Allah have mercy on him and grant him peace in the world to come.

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He enlisted in the US military willfully, underwent training willfully, fought in an American war willfully, and died by the will of Allah (SWT) for the causes of American interests and American projects in the region. Causes that are completely detached from Islam.

There is something that should never, under any circumstances, be confused, because the ramifications of confusing it are disastrous both in terms of the dunya and akhira. The guides that the Holy Prophet (pbuh) left us with are the Thaqalayn: the Holy Qur'an and Ahlul Bayt. The circumstances under which an individual is allowed to wage warfare are therefore clearly defined notions that can not and should not be blurred. Fighting for a cause other than the cause of Islam, and dying for a cause other than the cause of Islam, is not a religiously sanctioned course of action for any Muslim. He who willfully fights, risks his life, and gives his life for a cause other than the cause of Islam has not shown gratitude for the life that Allah (SWT) has given him, and there is no justification for this.

If Imam Ali (as) withdrew himself from the battlefield to avoid killing an enemy of Islam out of anger instead of it being for the sake of Allah, this should send a strong message to every person who claims to be of Shi'at Ali (as) that your very intention in jihad-al-ashgar is paramount, even if your adversary is an enemy of Islam regardless of your intention. What then, if you are fighting for an oppressor that has killed thousands of Muslims through warfare and bombing, supplied weapons that have killed hundreds of thousands of Muslims, starved hundreds of thousands more through sanctions, and invaded and occupied Muslim lands (and supported others in doing so), for causes that have everything to do with capitalist greed and hegemony, and nothing to do with justice and the values that Islam represents?

If he thought that he was doing a rightful thing or a justified thing, then may Allah (SWT) deal with him justly.

Edited by Learned
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He died fighting for the enemy of the muslims in a time where muslims from all over the world have called for a jihad against the people he died fighting for.

There are two ways to gaurentee yourself a ticket to hell in Islam... committing suicide, and being a munafiq (betrayer).

He died fighting mujahideen in Afghanistan, as far as I'm concerned, if you betray your faith in war then you don't deserve to call yourself a muslim.

I'm sorry to say, but this is the ugly truth, I'm not going to pretend to feel sorry for him, it's REALITY and it is ISLAMIC.

May Allah have mercy on his soul, I believe that is all we can say.

What mujahedin? They were a bunch of savage murderers and little-boy rapists who killed 40 000 Shiahs and God knows how many Sunnis who didn't agree with their views got killed.

It seems that any stinking illiterate criminal with bad teeth who puts on a beard is a mujahid to you guys.

They were enemies of Allah (swt) and may He burn those homo pedophile murderers in hell.

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He died fighting for the enemy of the muslims in a time where muslims from all over the world have called for a jihad against the people he died fighting for.

There are two ways to gaurentee yourself a ticket to hell in Islam... committing suicide, and being a munafiq (betrayer).

He died fighting mujahideen in Afghanistan, as far as I'm concerned, if you betray your faith in war then you don't deserve to call yourself a muslim.

I'm sorry to say, but this is the ugly truth, I'm not going to pretend to feel sorry for him, it's REALITY and it is ISLAMIC.

May Allah have mercy on his soul, I believe that is all we can say.

Clowns like you engage in groupthink and as a result are unable to think for themselves.

You think anyone who has a beard and claims to be uphold the will of the Almighty is worthy of praise.

Typical e-jihadi filth.

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Taliban and Wahhabis are enemies of the Shias of Imam Ali.

They hate Imam Ali and therefore they hate those who follow him.

Christians do not hate Shias.

In fact, Christians are friends of Shias. They let us pray, and hold public processions for Imam Hussain.

Talibans, Salafis and Wahhabis are cold blooded killers who want to drink blood of entire humanity.

They murder innocent people whoever they may be.

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Christians do not hate Shias.

America is NOT run by Christians, but by a bunch of megalomaniacs intent on dominating the world. Look up the world 'neo-colonialism' to find out more.

To be a pawn of the neo-colonialists is hardly an honor. Currently the commander-in-chief of the US military is the biggest violator of their own constitution, I wonder why any muslim would want to die obeying his orders (that are neither islamic nor constitutional)

I would recommend watching 'why we fight' to all who think there's any shred of morality behind these wars..

Edited by ShahLatif
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He enlisted in the US military willfully, underwent training willfully, fought in an American war willfully, and died by the will of Allah (SWT) for the causes of American interests and American projects in the region. Causes that are completely detached from Islam.

There is something that should never, under any circumstances, be confused, because the ramifications of confusing it are disastrous both in terms of the dunya and akhira. The guides that the Holy Prophet (pbuh) left us with are the Thaqalayn: the Holy Qur'an and Ahlul Bayt. The circumstances under which an individual is allowed to wage warfare are therefore clearly defined notions that can not and should not be blurred. Fighting for a cause other than the cause of Islam, and dying for a cause other than the cause of Islam, is not a religiously sanctioned course of action for any Muslim. He who willfully fights, risks his life, and gives his life for a cause other than the cause of Islam has not shown gratitude for the life that Allah (SWT) has given him, and there is no justification for this.

If Imam Ali (as) withdrew himself from the battlefield to avoid killing an enemy of Islam out of anger instead of it being for the sake of Allah, this should send a strong message to every person who claims to be of Shi'at Ali (as) that your very intention in jihad-al-ashgar is paramount, even if your adversary is an enemy of Islam regardless of your intention. What then, if you are fighting for an oppressor that has killed thousands of Muslims through warfare and bombing, supplied weapons that have killed hundreds of thousands of Muslims, starved hundreds of thousands more through sanctions, and invaded and occupied Muslim lands (and supported others in doing so), for causes that have everything to do with capitalist greed and hegemony, and nothing to do with justice and the values that Islam represents?

If he thought that he was doing a rightful thing or a justified thing, then may Allah (SWT) deal with him justly.

As always, Br. Learned expresses himself in the most eloquent and balanced way.

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Clowns like you engage in groupthink and as a result are unable to think for themselves.

You think anyone who has a beard and claims to be uphold the will of the Almighty is worthy of praise.

Typical e-jihadi filth.

Same can be said to you. About Hassan Nasrallah or anyone of the Shia leaders.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

He enlisted in the US military willfully, underwent training willfully, fought in an American war willfully, and died by the will of Allah (SWT) for the causes of American interests and American projects in the region. Causes that are completely detached from Islam.

There is something that should never, under any circumstances, be confused, because the ramifications of confusing it are disastrous both in terms of the dunya and akhira. The guides that the Holy Prophet pbuh.gif left us with are the Thaqalayn: the Holy Qur'an and Ahlul Bayt. The circumstances under which an individual is allowed to wage warfare are therefore clearly defined notions that can not and should not be blurred. Fighting for a cause other than the cause of Islam, and dying for a cause other than the cause of Islam, is not a religiously sanctioned course of action for any Muslim. He who willfully fights, risks his life, and gives his life for a cause other than the cause of Islam has not shown gratitude for the life that Allah (SWT) has given him, and there is no justification for this.

If Imam Ali as.gif withdrew himself from the battlefield to avoid killing an enemy of Islam out of anger instead of it being for the sake of Allah, this should send a strong message to every person who claims to be of Shi'at Ali as.gif that your very intention in jihad-al-ashgar is paramount, even if your adversary is an enemy of Islam regardless of your intention. What then, if you are fighting for an oppressor that has killed thousands of Muslims through warfare and bombing, supplied weapons that have killed hundreds of thousands of Muslims, starved hundreds of thousands more through sanctions, and invaded and occupied Muslim lands (and supported others in doing so), for causes that have everything to do with capitalist greed and hegemony, and nothing to do with justice and the values that Islam represents?

If he thought that he was doing a rightful thing or a justified thing, then may Allah (SWT) deal with him justly.

As always, Br. Learned expresses himself in the most eloquent and balanced way.

Seconded.

He died fighting for the enemy of the muslims in a time where muslims from all over the world have called for a jihad against the people he died fighting for.

Not that I support joining the US Army, but I just wanted to point out that some of the same Muslims you speak of have hosted these soldiers in their country to protect them (the Occupied Hijazi regime being the best example). The mufti's would have more credibility if they liberated their own countries first.

There are two ways to gaurentee yourself a ticket to hell in Islam... committing suicide, and being a munafiq (betrayer).

So we agree that self-acclaimed "mujahideen" in Iraq are booking themselves tickets to hell on a daily basis.

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Suicide and Suicide Bombing yourself are two different and very controversial subjects.

As muslims, we can all agree that suicide is wrong, so has the prohpet pbuh.

Suicide bombings didn't take place during the prophets time so we have no insight on this from our religion, but we go with our gut feeling on what is right or wrong.

I don't think suicide bombing is right, I am against it. To me, killing yourself in anyway is a cowards way out. That should never be an option, even if you have nothing to fight with.

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May Allah bless his soul! he died in the way of protecting shias in Afghanistan and here in the US.

If he succeeded in killing even one wahabbi/nasibi there.. he deserves jannah, end of the discussion.

What if he killed a Shia? The US army are very good at collateral damage.

The double-standards on this forum never cease. If this was an American soldier, we would all be sending our lanats on him.

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^He WAS an American soldier! Didn't you read the article?

I'm not going to say anything bad about the young man, even though I strongly disagree with the policies of the US Government that he worked for. Isn't it better to assume that his intentions were good unless we have reason to believe otherwise? What happened to making 70 excuses for apparent misdeeds of a fellow Muslim?

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Yes he was an American soldier n enlisted in the military to kill wahabbis and defend Shias in Afghanistan and in the US and das wat i will assume... u can send as many lanat on him as u want but i still believe that he is better than us!!

i personally know a few shias who enlisted in the US military to fite wahabbis and saddamists.

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Isn't it better to assume that his intentions were good unless we have reason to believe otherwise? What happened to making 70 excuses for apparent misdeeds of a fellow Muslim?

If we were to assume the intent of all those accused of harming Islam to be good, then 75% of the posts in the general politics forum would have to be deleted. I am not going to judge a Muslim who consciously took part in the invasion of a Muslim country (which, as posters like Dan Rafi forget, is a Shia country) any differently to a non-Muslim that took part in the invasion. Why is it that we Shias are so quick to call Arab collaborators in the Occupied Territories traitors, yet view those Shias that take part in the invasion and occupation of a Muslim nation differently? This is exactly the kind of thing that Wahhabis use against us to try and prove that we're in some way hoping for the destruction of the Middle East so that Iran can just invade everyone.

Yes he was an American soldier n enlisted in the military to kill wahabbis and defend Shias in Afghanistan and in the US and das wat i will assume... u can send as many lanat on him as u want but i still believe that he is better than us!!

i personally know a few shias who enlisted in the US military to fite wahabbis and saddamists.

I'm not sending lanats on anyone. To assume that every shot fired by a US soldier somehow magically ends up in the head of Wahhabi or "Saddamist" is absolutely absurd.

And for those Shia's who purposefully enlist in the US military for the sole purpose of "fighting Wahhabis and Saddamists" - you are worthy of all the scorn poured onto you by the very same people you hate. Taking part in an invasion of a country is not the time or the place to vent murderous tendencies - especially when that country is over 60% Shia. I suppose some people think that Wahhabis and "Saddamists" all look like Bin Laden and Saddam Hussein.

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^There is a difference between opposing wrongdoing and making assumptions about the intentions of the people who do what is apparently wrong, and I, personally, speak against atrocities, dishonesty, and injustice, not against individuals. I agree, it is hypocrisy to speak against the common Arab soldier fighting against Shia, while not speaking against Shia who conspire with tyrants, but there is not a thing wrong with speaking against the tyrants and terror leaders themselves, nor their organizations, and most of the footsoldiers are just men (and sometimes even boys or women) trying to survive and improve their family's situation.

As a former soldier in the US Army (before I was Muslim), I would definitely not recommend joining to anyone for any reason, even not considering the current tyranny of the Bush & Co regime. However, the young man did what he did, and the article says his intentions were for good. What benefit is there to think ill of him?

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^There is a difference between opposing wrongdoing and making assumptions about the intentions of the people who do what is apparently wrong, and I, personally, speak against atrocities, dishonesty, and injustice, not against individuals. I agree, it is hypocrisy to speak against the common Arab soldier fighting against Shia, while not speaking against Shia who conspire with tyrants, but there is not a thing wrong with speaking against the tyrants and terror leaders themselves, nor their organizations, and most of the footsoldiers are just men (and sometimes even boys or women) trying to survive and improve their family's situation.

As a former soldier in the US Army (before I was Muslim), I would definitely not recommend joining to anyone for any reason, even not considering the current tyranny of the Bush & Co regime. However, the young man did what he did, and the article says his intentions were for good. What benefit is there to think ill of him?

I do understand that people join the army for economic and social reasons as opposed to just signing up to do what's 'right'. Whilst understanding this and sympathising with those that join imperialist armies to help their economic situation - I don't see this as an excuse.

Don't get me wrong - I'm not happy that this person died. He was, like it's been said in this thread already, just a pawn of his government. At the same time, I believe in free will - and my free will, despite any financial or social problems at home or in my community - has led me to not join an army which will result in me killing my own people in Iraq or Afghanistan. Just to clarify, I actually know someone who was until recently serving in Afghanistan (and is still serving in another country as it happens) - so I am not someone that is totally detatched from the conflict and does a little dance everytime a US or UK soldier dies in one of the many conflicts today.

As for the article saying that his intentions were good - they all do, don't they?

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