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In the Name of God بسم الله

Iraqi Puppet Regime Calls Us Their Friend

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Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari

The Americans are there with the consent and the approval of the Iraqi elected government," he said. "Americans are there. They're our friends. They're sacrificing. So, therefore, whatever happens to them, actually, we should feel that pain."

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This is the kind of despicable puppets (la) who have stolen Iraq from the people - he says not a word about the slaughter of Iraqi people by the Americans, instead praises 'em.

Edited by skylight1
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íóÇ ÃóíøõåóÇ ÇáøóÐöíäó ÂãóäõæÇ áóÇ ÊóÊøóÎöÐõæÇ ÚóÏõæøöí æóÚóÏõæøóßõãú ÃóæúáöíóÇÁ ÊõáúÞõæäó Åöáóíúåöã ÈöÇáúãóæóÏøóÉö æóÞóÏú ßóÝóÑõæÇ ÈöãóÇ ÌóÇÁßõã ãøöäó ÇáúÍóÞøö íõÎúÑöÌõæäó ÇáÑøóÓõæáó æóÅöíøóÇßõãú Ãóä ÊõÄúãöäõæÇ ÈöÇááøóåö ÑóÈøößõãú Åöä ßõäÊõãú ÎóÑóÌúÊõãú ÌöåóÇÏðÇ Ýöí ÓóÈöíáöí æóÇÈúÊöÛóÇÁ ãóÑúÖóÇÊöí ÊõÓöÑøõæäó Åöáóíúåöã ÈöÇáúãóæóÏøóÉö æóÃóäóÇ ÃóÚúáóãõ ÈöãóÇ ÃóÎúÝóíúÊõãú æóãóÇ ÃóÚúáóäÊõãú æóãóä íóÝúÚóáúåõ ãöäßõãú ÝóÞóÏú Öóáøó ÓóæóÇÁ ÇáÓøóÈöíáö

O ye who believe! Take not my enemies and yours as friends (or protectors),- offering them (your) love, even though they have rejected the Truth that has come to you, and have (on the contrary) driven out the Prophet and yourselves (from your homes), (simply) because ye believe in Allah your Lord! If ye have come out to strive in My Way and to seek My Good Pleasure, (take them not as friends), holding secret converse of love (and friendship) with them: for I know full well all that ye conceal and all that ye reveal. And any of you that does this has strayed from the Straight Path.

(sorat al-mumtahina aya-1)

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Salaam alaykum

I don't think we can label the entire Iraqi government as a "Puppet Regime", this is wrong. These are the elected government, and moreover people like Nouri al-Maliki and Ibrahim al-Ja'fari are pious and educated members of Hizb Al-Da'awa the Shi'ite political party founded by Sayyed Baqir Al-Sadr.

I have heard that the Kurdish Foreign Minister you quoted above is thoroughly corrupt, but they have to keep him to satisfy the Kurds. However I don't think the overall government is that bad. Their situation is very complex. With something like 150,000 American troops in their country they have no choice but to be friends with the US and try to use the US to their own advantage.

Let us not be too quick to judge everyone.

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An "elected government" that kills its own people with the assistance, and leadership of an occupying imperialist power - is, infact, nothing more than a puppet regime. The movement founded by Baqir As-Sadr is being led by Muqtada Sadr, who has clearly distanced himself from the puppet regime, and the people who uphold the principles of Sadr have been killed by the puppet regime.

post-13435-1215135289.jpg

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First of all my dear brother skylight, I think it is extremely hard for us who are so far removed from the actual situation, with our limited knowledge and our biased news sources, to really make a fair judgment about the situation in Iraq. However let us try to discuss this, perchance we can both benefit.

I will agree that Muqtada Al-Sadr has many supporters due to numerous reasons:

- His militia, the Mahdi Army, provides lots of social services to the poor Shias especially in the slums of Baghdad (Sadr city)

- The Iraqi government has been unable to do much for its people (largely due to American interference)

- He is seen as one of those who stayed and bore the brunt of Saddam's oppression unlike the current government heads who lived in places like Iran up until recently

However, given the sensitive and complicated situation in Iraq, who do you really think is more capable of handling this? The educated political leaders who currently comprise the elected officials, or Muqtada Al-Sadr who from my understanding has no real secular or theological education worthy of mention (please correct me if I'm wrong). With the occupying Americans on the one side, and the Iraqi Sunnis who are terrified of the thought of Shias rising to power, we need calm Shia politicians who look like normal guys (you know suit, tie, thin beard etc :) ). Hot-headed clerics will only distance the other demographics whom the Shias must work with in order to bring about stability to this war-torn country.

Lastly, please tell me if you can what Muqtada Al-Sadr is trying to do by running his own militia and rebelling against the government. Before laying the blame of the bloodshed squarely upon the "puppet government", tell me how it makes sense for an untrained and unorganized militia to do what they want. This is anarchy man! Does Muqtada want to overthrow the entire Iraqi government? Does he think he can take on the US? Then what next? Will he be able to run Iraq by himself???

May Allah improve the situation of the Shias.

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Here is what your so-called "educated" political leaders (in reality American puppets) are doing:

According to Iraq's oil minister, the long-term contracts will be signed within a year. While ostensibly under the control of the Iraq National Oil Company, foreign corporations will keep 75% of the value of the contracts, leaving just 25% for their Iraqi partners. That kind of ratio is unheard of in oil-rich Arab and Persian states, where achieving majority national control over oil was the defining victory of anti-colonial struggles. According to Greg Muttitt, a London-based oil expert, the assumption up until now was that foreign multinationals would be brought in to develop new fields in Iraq - not to take over those which are already in production and therefore require minimal technical support. "The policy was always to allocate these fields to the Iraq National Oil Company," he told me. "This is a total reversal of that policy, giving the Iraq National Oil Company a mere 25% instead of the planned 100%.""

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I will agree that Muqtada Al-Sadr has many supporters due to numerous reasons:

- His militia, the Mahdi Army, provides lots of social services to the poor Shias especially in the slums of Baghdad (Sadr city)

- The Iraqi government has been unable to do much for its people (largely due to American interference)

- He is seen as one of those who stayed and bore the brunt of Saddam's oppression unlike the current government heads who lived in places like Iran up until recently

- His militias is not restricted to the slums of Baghdad rather they are the biggest social welfare organisation in the country.

- That is a moot point given that the Iraqi Government has had more than enough time to restore and provide basic necessities of life to the people and have failed miserably.

- Not Iran but out in the West too. Many of the politicians met in UK before the invasion attending a meeting where the new strategy was discussed.

However, given the sensitive and complicated situation in Iraq, who do you really think is more capable of handling this? The educated political leaders who currently comprise the elected officials, or Muqtada Al-Sadr who from my understanding has no real secular or theological education worthy of mention (please correct me if I'm wrong). With the occupying Americans on the one side, and the Iraqi Sunnis who are terrified of the thought of Shias rising to power, we need calm Shia politicians who look like normal guys (you know suit, tie, thin beard etc :) ). Hot-headed clerics will only distance the other demographics whom the Shias must work with in order to bring about stability to this war-torn country.

Firstly, Moqtada has a political party in the country standing in the Government as well as in the Parliament hence if he was not capable of anything he would not be in the Parliament nor would people vote for him.

Secondly, the definition of Shia politicians is not defined by their appearance rather it is by their ability to govern a nation and have their best interests at heart. If appearance was the definition of being a capable calm politician then Muawaiyah would get all the votes.

Thirdly, yes the Sunnis are terrified of the Shias being in the Government because they are so vocal about is the way the Government is working which is for the Shia interests only and are taking the wealth of Iraq away for their own use meaning that they will be left out to dry. This is where the elitist again in the Shia majority have a role in this aspect and they are guilty of this.

Lastly, please tell me if you can what Muqtada Al-Sadr is trying to do by running his own militia and rebelling against the government. Before laying the blame of the bloodshed squarely upon the "puppet government", tell me how it makes sense for an untrained and unorganized militia to do what they want. This is anarchy man! Does Muqtada want to overthrow the entire Iraqi government? Does he think he can take on the US? Then what next? Will he be able to run Iraq by himself?

From the establishment of the Mahdi Army till now it has gone through many phases of reformation and organisation. Comparing the Mahdi army that was on the streets of Najaf in 2004 to the Mahdi Army now you will see a massive difference in both their way of operation and their motive. Before yes it was an unorganised and untrained militia but after seeing the consequences of this Moqtada called for a temporary ceasefire in which the militia has been refomed and organised. It is far from perfect but if they can make a change now for the betterment of the state of Iraq then it is worthwhile achievement given that their track record at least they have learnt a thing or two.

Given the recent bloodshed in Basra where the US forces had to intervene, the blame does lie with the puppet Government since the whole fiasco broke the ceasefire giving the opportunity for the Mahdi Army to be rearmed again and on the streets of Iraq. Moqtada is against the occupation of the US forces in the region and if you notice in the recent weeks when the SOFA was put on the table by the US he has been very vocal about this and that in itself highlights what he wants. The Government should pursue an active stand to ensure that the occupational forces leave Iraq with a set timetable. Moreover having occupational forces aids no one in the country apart from the elitists simply because the elitists have their hands in the same pocket as the US.

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^ Thanks very much for your post bro.

Firstly, Moqtada has a political party in the country standing in the Government as well as in the Parliament hence if he was not capable of anything he would not be in the Parliament nor would people vote for him.

Due to the points we both mentioned above, Muqtada has many supporters; he is a populist leader. This does not necessarily make him the most capable to lead. But since you're defending Moqtada, you too must agree that he has given his support to the current political process right? So then if he is part of this "puppet" government it can't be all bad right? Maybe they can work within this system to do some good.

Secondly, the definition of Shia politicians is not defined by their appearance rather it is by their ability to govern a nation and have their best interests at heart. If appearance was the definition of being a capable calm politician then Muawaiyah would get all the votes.

I guess I was just saying that in a situation like Iraq our PR image is important, and thus guys with suits and ties might have more of a chance of overcoming the sectarian image and being nationalist politicians working for the betterment of the country and gathering support of other alienated groups. But for sure this is secondary to the interests that these people have at heart.

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^ Thanks very much for your post bro.

Due to the points we both mentioned above, Muqtada has many supporters; he is a populist leader. This does not necessarily make him the most capable to lead. But since you're defending Moqtada, you too must agree that he has given his support to the current political process right? So then if he is part of this "puppet" government it can't be all bad right? Maybe they can work within this system to do some good.

I guess I was just saying that in a situation like Iraq our PR image is important, and thus guys with suits and ties might have more of a chance of overcoming the sectarian image and being nationalist politicians working for the betterment of the country and gathering support of other alienated groups. But for sure this is secondary to the interests that these people have at heart.

As salam Alaykum:

All governments suffer from corruption. I am not a fan of Al Maliki but if he stands his ground and does not allow the US to remain in Iraq (which it has no right to do so) then he will at least be in sync with the desire of most Iraqis and Ayatollah Sistani. Also, he must make sure some of the Iraqi oil revenues reach the Iraqi people and that order is maintained. I say "some" of the oil revenues because we all know, unfortunately, that governments horde money. Look at the US, the richest nation on earth, where 1/3 of its citizens live in poverty (I hope this does not surprise anyone).

Al Maliki, with the help of Moqtada, was elected. This present administration must be respected, which is the position of both Sadr and Sistani. Yet, the government must also respect the dignity of its citizens: End the occupation, provide security and rule of law, and maintain the social welfare of the people.

ws

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I have to say one thing about the U.S being in Iraq. 90% of Americans do not wish to be there, and want someone to remove are trupes. The other 10% have lost someone because of this "war" and want reveng. I persanaly dont see the point of being over there, and I'm sorry that we are and the pain we have caused to the people. My Brother is being sent over there nex year and he dusn't want to be but he has no choice in the mater because he sined up for the military. I am sorry for what my goverment has dune and I hope that it ends sune. :(

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Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari

The Americans are there with the consent and the approval of the Iraqi elected government," he said. "Americans are there. They're our friends. They're sacrificing. So, therefore, whatever happens to them, actually, we should feel that pain."

----------------

Mr Zebari, you may feel "pain" for American losses, but I dont think that these same Americans felt pain when they destroyed thousands of your houses, killed hundreds of thousands of your people, raped your wemen, displaced millions, and made millions more live in constant fear!

And Yeh, I dont also think that the Americans felt pain when they provided Saddam (once thier home boy) with chemical weapons, which he used on your own kurdish people.

But yeh, politics is politics!

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I have to say one thing about the U.S being in Iraq. 90% of Americans do not wish to be there, and want someone to remove are trupes. The other 10% have lost someone because of this "war" and want reveng. I persanaly dont see the point of being over there, and I'm sorry that we are and the pain we have caused to the people. My Brother is being sent over there nex year and he dusn't want to be but he has no choice in the mater because he sined up for the military. I am sorry for what my goverment has dune and I hope that it ends sune. :(

nope.

it's ur corporatocracy system in government who made this world today. not hte american civilian. time to revolution

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Due to the points we both mentioned above, Muqtada has many supporters; he is a populist leader. This does not necessarily make him the most capable to lead. But since you're defending Moqtada, you too must agree that he has given his support to the current political process right? So then if he is part of this "puppet" government it can't be all bad right? Maybe they can work within this system to do some good.

Firstly, I am not defending him rather stating that he is not always bad as people like to think. I have given him praise for what he has done right and criticized him when he has been wrong.

Secondly, his support for the current political process is dependent on what aspect you are talking about. Does he believe that the Government should exist? Ofcourse however his main point of difference is the interference by the US and the point that the occupational forces are still present without a timetable of pulling out indicating long term interests in Iraq by US.

Thirdly, his involvement in the Government is only limited to certain ministries in which his party has excelled in many areas while been non-productive in other areas. Having said that yes there is more that they could have done but have not done so and they deserve criticism for that. However the question still remains if these ministries can progress even with continuous conflict with the Iraqi Army and Government why have the Government failed? The main areas of the Government are interfered by the US there is no denying that. You only have to look at the proposal of SOFA for that and the fact that many Iraqi Politicians have even considered such a proposal does indicate a sort of giving into the US pressure.

I guess I was just saying that in a situation like Iraq our PR image is important, and thus guys with suits and ties might have more of a chance of overcoming the sectarian image and being nationalist politicians working for the betterment of the country and gathering support of other alienated groups. But for sure this is secondary to the interests that these people have at heart.

Have a look at the rankings of the most corrupt nations in the World at present and see where Iraq is.

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Salaam alaykum

I don't think we can label the entire Iraqi government as a "Puppet Regime", this is wrong. These are the elected government, and moreover people like Nouri al-Maliki and Ibrahim al-Ja'fari are pious and educated members of Hizb Al-Da'awa the Shi'ite political party founded by Sayyed Baqir Al-Sadr.

I have heard that the Kurdish Foreign Minister you quoted above is thoroughly corrupt, but they have to keep him to satisfy the Kurds. However I don't think the overall government is that bad. Their situation is very complex. With something like 150,000 American troops in their country they have no choice but to be friends with the US and try to use the US to their own advantage.

Let us not be too quick to judge everyone.

Well said. It's refreshing to know that there is still a voice of reason left among the fellow brothers and sisters on the Iraq forum when it comes to the situation in Iraq, which many of the young pundits here have completely misunderstood.

Edited by MajiC
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