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In the Name of God بسم الله
fadak_166

Share Your Iraqi Recipes

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I thought I was going to see something new here, not stolen Leb dishes and calling them Iraqi recipes...

Ba Dumm Tsssss....

How adorable...

Anyways, here's an Iraqi dish that is hella famous apparently...

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Baydat w Tamer'

Eggz and dates... Maybe I'd taste it, if the dates were well stewed first...

Now is this counted as a meal or desert? Please elaborate...

So this is actually a real food?!!! I remember my mom making that when I was younger and she would convince me to eat it by saying it's arab food. I never believed her, but she was right!

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DATLEEE!!

Classic Iraqi sweets, very delicious (and fattening :P). I have made a image tutorial to make the process easier, I really hope you enjoy!!

Its very easy to make and really good for ramadan, you can make a batch that will last you 2 days (if you can resist temptation :P).

you can make them bite size or into donut shapes, so whatever you prefer.

Please note that the sugar syrup recipe is the normal one, nothing new, just the usual 2 cups sugar, one cup water, teaspoon of lemon juice recipe

I apologise for

  • bad image quality (used phone to take pics and paint to edit)
  • bad spelling and grammar (very quick job)
  • anything that looks off or retarded in the pics or explanation :P

Any questions please dont hestitate to ask me

PLEASE NOTE - DO NOT ADD ALL THE WATER ON THE FLOUR, add most of it first, mix to see if it needs more, then add bit by bit, otherwise if it becomes waterly and sticks to your hand then it wont come out nice.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tablespoons butter (you can add more if you want, the more you add the less soft inside and more crumbly)
  • 2 tablespoons oil (can be normal sunflower or olive oil)
  • sugar syrup

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Anyway, anyone tasted bagila oo dihin? The fried egg with an overdose of oil = :sick:

We call it Bagila oo bayth (broad beans and eggs) and yes you have to pour a load of oil on top. :)

I do a cheat version where the broad beans are canned, they are the brown ones not the green ones. They might be the same but brown ones are boiled? Im not sure, but make sure they are brown. (My lack of cooking skills is showing here).

Anyways the bagila is already mainly cooked so i open the can and just heat it up with its water until it boils, then fry eggs separately in a pan with alot of oil.

Break bread into pieces of eatable size and put in a dish, then put the bagila on top with its water. Add the eggs on top and then pour the oil as well...

This is a very iraqi dish and noone can claim it as theirs!

You can have this as breakfast, lunch or dinner. Its quick and easy to do and suitable for anytime.

Some of these recipes are great, i am iraqi but i hardly cook iraqi food. I have only recently started cooking so my cooking skills arent great but this thread will be a great help to start learning. So thank you all for sharing...and keep the recipes coming.

Edited by MummyZ

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Bacha- iraqi delicacy

 

The major ingredients you would require to prepare pacha is Sheep’s (or goat’s or lamb’s) head, the stomach (cleaned and processed under sanitary measures), lamb meat, rice, onions, tomatoes, water for boiling and bread. You are free to choose from the several seasoning options that are available including pepper, herbs, etc.

Process

So, how do we cook Pacha? Well, there is nothing much, indeed, that you would be required to do.

a. Just boil the water and immerse the sheep head so that it is totally dipped in the water.

b. Bring the water to boil. You can even add salt in the water for taste. Boil until the meat has become tender and could be cut out using a table knife.

c. Take the head out with the froth covering the parts of the head.

 

Happy bacha eating !!!

d. Now for your own interest, you can even try out bar be cue with the sheep head but they do not practice it authentically.

e. For sides, stuff the sheep stomach with steamed rice and the sheep meat pieces before you sew it up.

f. The pacha is now ready to be dressed with your favorite seasoning and served with tomato and onion salad. You can also serve the bread in the sides.

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Ew bacha's nasty, I can never eat it..... My mom made me eat the tongue when I was 9... It was a horrifying experience...

Wow everything on here is something I've never I had! (except for the gross bacha)...... I don't feel iraqi anymore :'(

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My the best iraqi friend taught me how to make biriani, maqlooba, dolma, borek, kebbeh and some other dishes. My favourite one is biriani and i discovered that sharia ( sorry i don't know how to type it correctly ) its just a normal pasta! :D :D 

 

From sweets i love kleja and i don't remember the name but it was something orange what i ate on Muharram ceremony. Does someone know the name of it? It tastes like caramel a bit.

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On 11/1/2008 at 10:58 AM, fadak_166 said:

Stuffed Grape Leaves (Dolmas) with Pictures

makes 60 to 70 rolls

Filling:

4 cups brown rice, soaked for at least 1 hour, then drained & rinsed

1 to 2 pounds finely diced meat ? venison, grass-fed beef, or natural lamb

1/2 onion, finely diced

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

2-1/2 teaspoons sea salt

3/4 teaspoon pepper

3/4 teaspoon allspice

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

dolma_filling.JPG

Rolls:

(2) 8-ounce jars grape leaves, drained & rinsed well

juice of 1/2 lemon

sea salt

water

Combine all stuffing ingredients and mix well in bowl. The picture demonstrates that the meat must be finely diced.

Lay out a towel for blotting next to a clean work surface, such as a cutting board. Take one grape leaf and blot it dry on the towel, then transfer it to your work surface, orienting it with the stem side facing toward you and with the rough (veined) side up.

dol1.JPG

Put 1 teaspoon of the stuffing above the stem and spread it out in a tube-shape as the picture shows.

dol2.JPG

Fold the bottom up over the stuffing.

dol3.JPG

Fold each side to the middle.

dol4.JPG

dol5.JPG

Roll tightly to make a tube that is about 3 inches long and 1/2 inch thick. Dimensions may vary depending on the size of grape leaves. Adjust amount of filling accordingly, but realize that the filling will swell quite a bit when the rice cooks. You will risk breaking the grape leaves during cooking if the rolls hold too much filling.

As you finish each roll, transfer it to a large stockpot, keeping the end of the rolled edge down. Repeat. Pack the finished rolls tightly into layers in the pot, as shown.

When all rolls are finished, sprinkle the tops of all the rolls in the pot with sea salt. Drizzle the lemon juice over all. Cover with water that comes up an inch or two over the top of the rolls. Put a lid or plate that fits inside the pot over the top of all the rolls to keep them in place while cooking.

Bring the contents of the pot to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and let simmer for 1 hour. Add water as necessary to make sure all the rolls are covered during the entire cooking time. After 1 hour, check a roll for doneness. The rice should be soft. Keep cooking until the rice is tender.

When done, remove from heat. Drain the excess water. Gentle remove the rolls from the pan to a serving platter or storage container. Try not to break them; they will firm up as they cool down. Serve warm or cold, salting as desired.

Note: there are MANY recipes for this, and different fillings. this is just one of many

Thanks for sharing recipes with us. I will try this.

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Yes, Of course Biryani is the king of all dishes and you can make biryani in any style.But most delicious biryani recipe style comes from Iraq, the smorgasbord of taste  and the aroma of history blends to offer you distinctly delicious dishes, rich in taste, aroma and delight.Will share here with step by step images on how to make Delicious Iraqi Biryani

 

Ingredients

250 g minced lamb
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
2 tablespoons onions, finely chopped
1 cup vegetable oil or 220 g, for deep frying
1 medium potato or 150 g, cut into medium cubes
1 medium carrot or 150 g, cut into medium cubes
1 medium onion or 125 g, sliced
½ cup frozen green peas or 80 g, thawed
1 whole chicken or 800 g, cooked, without bones and shredded
2 tablespoons raisins
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
Pinch of saffron filaments
½ cup almonds or 75 g, peeled and toasted
2 tablespoons ghee
¾ cup vermicelli or 75 g
2 cups rice or 400 g, washed
2 cubes  Chicken Stock Bouillon Cube
1½ teaspoons arabic mixed spicess
4 cups water or 1000 ml

 

How to Prepare

 

In a mixing bowl, combine minced lamb, onion and parsley (season with salt and pepper).

Form meat mixture into small balls; place in a baking tray and bake in a preheated oven at 200˚C for 10 minutes or until meat balls are cooked. Remove and set aside.

 

Meanwhile, deep fry potato and carrot in the hot oil (reserve 2 tablespoons of oil) and set them aside over a kitchen tissue to absorb any excess oil. In a medium saucepan, heat the reserved oil and sauté onion until its tender then add green peas, shredded chicken meat, raisins, black pepper powder, saffron leaves, almonds, the prepared meat balls potato and carrot. Stir until well combined and set aside (add salt to your taste).

In a medium pot, melt the ghee, add the vermicelli and stir until vermicelli is changed in color to golden brown; Add rice, MAGGI Chicken Stock cubes and spices (add salt if needed). Stir for seconds then add the water and stir constantly to boil. Cover and simmer over a low heat for 20 minutes or until rice is cooked.

Image result for heat the reserved oil and sauté onion until its tender then add green peas, shredded chicken meat, raisins, black pepper powder, saffron leaves, almonds, the prepared meat balls potato and carrot

 

Add the prepared meat and vegetable mixture over the rice and mix all carefully with the rice. Cover and cook for another 5 minutes then serve.

Iraqi Biryani Recipe

 

 

 

 

There are more Iraqi recipes my friend Jehuna has shared me one website with lots of Iraqi recipes.Will share with you the link here:http://www.nestle-family.com/english/iraqi-recipes.aspx

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23 hours ago, mabroo said:

Yes, Of course Biryani is the king of all dishes and you can make biryani in any style.But most delicious biryani recipe style comes from Iraq, the smorgasbord of taste  and the aroma of history blends to offer you distinctly delicious dishes, rich in taste, aroma and delight.Will share here with step by step images on how to make Delicious Iraqi Biryani

 

 

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