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In the Name of God بسم الله

What Are You Reading Currently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]

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I bought this the other day - The Broken Bead: Reflections on the Life of Hazrat Fatima (as) by Ayatollah Wahid Khorasani. It's a translation of some of his lectures on Bibi Fatima (as).

(salam) I just finished reading Al-Muhaddithat: The Women Scholars in Islam 2 days ago.     This book is an adaptation of the Muqaddimah or Preface to Mohammad Akram’s 40-volume biographical diction

^ Every person old enough to understand it should read 1984.

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Started this:

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The Black Album by Hanif Kureishi

About the rise of fanaticism among the immigrant communities of Britain. It's written in the mid 90s, much earlier than this phenomenon came to light post 9/11. Hope it's as good as the rest of Kureishi's novels. I have just started it.

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I'm reading Islam: a short history, by Karen Armstrong, at the recommendation of a muslim friend. It is highly informative about the complicated history of Islam. I recommend the reading for all, muslim and non-muslim alike.

(now if I could just get the hang of all those arabic words that muslims always love to use :o ... if I may joke... but no, really guys, those words are hard for us non-muslims to keep up with. :))

Salaam.

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Wondering which book to read next. I'm done with books I acquired at the literature festival apart from a collection of lousy short stories I'm neither keen nor in a hurry to read -_-

Any world class fiction, classic or contemporary, can you guys recommend? I'm itching to place a new order with my favourite retailer.

If you don't mind reading young adult, i would recommend Fault in our stars. i thought it was great

otherwise, i would definitely recommend "the heart is a lonley hunter" (if you don't mind a super depressing book).

also, read kafka's metamorphosis and then come back and tell me what you think about it

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If you don't mind reading young adult, i would recommend Fault in our stars. i thought it was great

otherwise, i would definitely recommend "the heart is a lonley hunter" (if you don't mind a super depressing book).

Thanks for the recommendations. Will check 'em for sure.

also, read kafka's metamorphosis and then come back and tell me what you think about it

Done that already.

Gregor Samsa's travails prima facie seem to be a work of unaesthetic absurdity, typical Kafka that is, but there is so much more to it than waking one day and suddenly finding oneself transformed into a large vermin.

The callousness of close relations at finding you not how they like you to be, or how they are used to seeing you, and sudden and complete reversal of their feelings for you when your physical form changes, even though you are the same Samsa you were a night before you were transformed into an ugly vermin, informs deeply on human psychological perceptions of reality, family and relationships.

How the family was relieved and happy and took an outing on the boat after the ugly vermin Samsa died of his wounds was unsettling and sad.

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Wondering which book to read next. I'm done with books I acquired at the literature festival apart from a collection of lousy short stories I'm neither keen nor in a hurry to read -_-

Any world class fiction, classic or contemporary, can you guys recommend? I'm itching to place a new order with my favourite retailer.

Have you read The Lord of the Rings?

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No, but I have *watched* it.

It's quite the stuff for the screen no?

There so much more to be gained from reading the books. I decided to try reading them after I had seen the movies also. :)

I wasn't real keen on the onscreen violence of the movies.

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(salam)

Talking about myself. Splendid suns is the next on my list.

That's a good read, you'll enjoy it. Make sure you have a box of tissues handy.

You mean simultaneously?

Anyway, a fascinating title never lets you put it down and grab another book.

(salam)

I agree 100 percent, I'll finish a really good book in a day just because I won't want to put it down!

I read catch 22 by Joseph Heller, it's not really your typical novel, quite historical.

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(salam)

I agree 100 percent, I'll finish a really good book in a day just because I won't want to put it down!

I read catch 22 by Joseph Heller, it's not really your typical novel, quite historical.

Ws,

Haven't read Catch 22 but if it falls into the genre of historical fiction, then it's a full-fledged sub genre in its own right, and an important one.

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I am continuing Iqtisaduna.

Iqtisaduna1cover.jpg

I moved on to Pt. 2 of Vol. 1.

Pt. 1 was essentially an overview of Marxist economic doctrine and a critical appraisal of it.

Pt. 2 gives a quick overview of capitalist economic doctrine and critically appraises it.

But more importantly, Islamic economic doctrine is finally brought into the mix. Shahid Sadr lays out certain principles in Islamic economics and contrasts them with that of Marxism and capitalism. For example, he states that Islamic economics presents the idea of double-ownership as a permanent principle. Whereas capitalist and Marxist economies accept this principle only as exceptions that are brought about by necessity (and which would be discarded if possible), Islam accepts both forms of ownership (private and public) as necessary for the economy.

Or, for example, Shahid Sadr mentions that Islamic economics is the subordination of economic "science" to ideological and human values. Meaning the economics in Islam is a means of reaching an ideological end, rather than being an end in and of itself.

In any case I liked Pt. 2 much better than Pt. 1, because the Shahid finally began assessing the Islamic economic doctrine.

The translation still sucks though. I mean no offense toward the people who worked hard to translate this book, but it's obvious that English is not their native tongue.

Ya Ali

Thanks so much for the above brother, even if I'm reading it after two years.. :)

I have a question, have you read this book: and do you know if it's the same or a better version of the version you had read?

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Besieged: Life Under Fire on a Sarajevo Street

besieged-life-under-fire-on-sarajevo-street-barbara-demick-paperback-cover-art.jpg

For four centuries, Logavina Street was a quiet residential road in a cosmopolitan city, home to Muslims and Christians, Serbs and Croats. Then the war tore the street apart. In this extraordinary eyewitness account, Demick weaves together the stories of ten families from Logavina Street. For three and a half years, they were often without heat, water, food or electricity. They had to evade daily sniper fire and witnessed the deaths of friends, neighbours and family. Alongside the horrific realities of living in a warzone, Demick describes the roots of the conflict and explains how neighbours and friends were turned so swiftly into deadly enemies. With the same honest, intimate reporting style which won her so many plaudits for Nothing to Envy, Barbara Demick brilliantly illuminates one of the pivotal events of the twentieth century, and describes how, twenty years later, the residents of Logavina Street are coping with its consequences.

Edited by AJ 12
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A Pocket Philosophical Dictionary by Voltaire

No, it's a not a dictionary. It's a collection of articles about topics on life, society and politics authored by Voltaire which become one of the founding and widely read texts of the European Enlightenment. Read a few of them so far. Craftily written, with wit and humour. Enjoying it...

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That's a good read, you'll enjoy it. Make sure you have a box of tissues handy.

I agree 100 percent, I'll finish a really good book in a day just because I won't want to put it down!

I read catch 22 by Joseph Heller, it's not really your typical novel, quite historical.

That was my dads favourite satire novel and a favourite of mine too =)) i have so much affection for that book. I love so much that my dad and i shared that kind of absurd humour.

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That was my dads favourite satire novel and a favourite of mine too =)) i have so much affection for that book. I love so much that my dad and i shared that kind of absurd humour.

(salam)

That's really sweet. As it's quite a slow-paced novel to accomodate for the historical and satirical aspect, it's not exactly popular so it's nice to find that you've read it.

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(salam)

That's really sweet. As it's quite a slow-paced novel to accomodate for the historical and satirical aspect, it's not exactly popular so it's nice to find that you've read it.

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Catch-22? its a classic! always appears on top 100 books of all time lists. It was made into a film in ... i think '71 with Alan Arkin as Yossarian. Also stared Orson Wells as colonal Cathcart xD, John Voight as Milo Minderbinder...Martin Sheen...Anthony Perkins...Art Garfunkle (i had the film on VHS when i was little =P), but my dad always said the book was un-filmable and the film in no way does it justice.

(salam)

I've seen the film and have to say I agree with what your dad said, completely.

True, but how many people read a book like that now days, being in a list doesn't make it popular especially with the younger generations. Hang on, you love Catch 22 but you make fun of Austen's masterpiece!! That doesn't even make sense :P

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