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Mizaan al Hikmah (English-Arabic). It's over a 1000 pages, and i just started it. So far I am liking it. It is kind of like a bundle of flowers on a much larger scale. So far have come across one hadith i found rather worrying : that it is recommended for women to keep long nails... hmm :donno:

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Mizaan al Hikmah (English-Arabic). It's over a 1000 pages, and i just started it. So far I am liking it. It is kind of like a bundle of flowers on a much larger scale. So far have come across one hadith i found rather worrying : that it is recommended for women to keep long nails... hmm :donno:

^ lol really?! hmmm thats kindda weird tho...Can u post the hadeeth on here?

Ü ÞÇá ÑÓæáõ Çááøåþö Ü ááÑöøÌÇáö Ü: ÞõÕõøæÇ ÃÙÇÝöíÑóßõã¡ æááäöøÓÇÁö: ÇõÊÑõßúäó ÝÅäøåõ ÃÒíóäõ áóßõäóø .

It is narrated in al-Kafi on the authority of al-Sakuni that the Prophet of Allah (as) said to men, ‘Cut your nails’, and to women, ‘Leave them for verily that is more beautiful for you.’[al-Kafi, v. 6, p. 490, p. 491, no. 15]

http://www.darolhadith.net/modules.php?name=my_AlfabetMenu&vid=258&scid=14

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I vote for "anyone else." :)

Sure, at your service :!!!:

Kafi

Úáí Èä ÅÈÑÇåíã¡ Úä ÃÈíå¡ Úä ÇáäæÝáí¡ Úä ÇáÓßæäí ÞÇá: ÞÇá ÑÓæá Çááå (Õáì Çááå Úáíå æÂáå)ááÑÌÇá: ÞÕæÇ ÃÙÇÝíÑßã¡ æááäÓÇÁ: ÇÊÑßä ÝÅäå ÃÒíä áßä.

It is narrated in al-Kafi on the authority of al-Sakuni that the Prophet of Allah (as) said to men, ‘Cut your nails’, and to women, ‘Leave them for verily that is more beautiful for you.’

Grading

Majlisi (miratul uqul vol 22 pg 389)

ÖÚíÝ Úáì ÇáãÔåæÑ

Bahboodi

ÖÚíÝ

Hadith is da'eef(weak) but famous. Bahboodi says it's just da'eef(weak). Narrator al-sakuni is an aami I believe.

PS: The grading doesn't mean much to me. The hadith is talking about recommended affairs so I definitely wouldn't worry too much about the grading.

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I am continuing Iqtisaduna.

Iqtisaduna1cover.jpg

I moved on to Pt. 2 of Vol. 1.

Pt. 1 was essentially an overview of Marxist economic doctrine and a critical appraisal of it.

Pt. 2 gives a quick overview of capitalist economic doctrine and critically appraises it.

But more importantly, Islamic economic doctrine is finally brought into the mix. Shahid Sadr lays out certain principles in Islamic economics and contrasts them with that of Marxism and capitalism. For example, he states that Islamic economics presents the idea of double-ownership as a permanent principle. Whereas capitalist and Marxist economies accept this principle only as exceptions that are brought about by necessity (and which would be discarded if possible), Islam accepts both forms of ownership (private and public) as necessary for the economy.

Or, for example, Shahid Sadr mentions that Islamic economics is the subordination of economic "science" to ideological and human values. Meaning the economics in Islam is a means of reaching an ideological end, rather than being an end in and of itself.

In any case I liked Pt. 2 much better than Pt. 1, because the Shahid finally began assessing the Islamic economic doctrine.

The translation still sucks though. I mean no offense toward the people who worked hard to translate this book, but it's obvious that English is not their native tongue.

Ya Ali

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The diary of a social butterfly by moni mohsin

DESCRIPTION

Meet butterfly, Pakistan’s most lovable, silly socialite. An avid partygoer, inspired misspeller, and unwittingly acute observer of Pakistani high society, Butterfly is a woman like no other. In her world, SMS becomes S & M and people eat ’three tiara cakes’ while shunning ‘do number ka maal’. ‘What cheeks!’ as she would say. As her country faces tribulation-from 9/11 to the assassination of Benazir Bhutto - Butterfly glides through her world, unfazed, untouched, and stopped short only by the chip in her manicure. Wicked and hugely entertaining, the diary of a social butterfly gives you a delicious glimpse into the parallel universe of the have-musts.

ref:http://www.dukandar.com/socialbutterfly.html

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The Cleanest Race: How North Koreans See Themselves and Why It Matters by B.R. Myers

31T%2BZVFAPUL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

This book is very different from any other book written about DPRK thus far. Myers offers a completely new claim: he explains DPRK's actions neither in terms of political science "realism" (national self-interests blah blah), nor in terms of small country victim mentality (relentlessly defending against neighboring big powers). He explains DPRK's ideology neither as a throwback to Stalinism nor as a Confucian patriarchy. Instead, he says that the DPRK has a racial ideology inherited from Japan during the era of occupation (1910-1945). So far it seems like he is just saying things for shock value. He hasn't produced much evidence to back up his radical claims. I haven't read the whole thing though, so maybe he has something more in store. I might say more on this later.

Finished with this.

Well his argument became more convincing toward the end, when he stopped over-analyzing paintings and instead cited evidence in the DPRK's policies that hint toward a race-based worldview. For example, many North Korean women who illegally cross the border into China return home pregnant. The government has a policy of aborting these babies.

He also cites how North Korean propaganda is often no more friendly to its allies than to its enemies. Laos, for example. Laos is an ally of the DPRK. But in the domestically consumed North Korean propaganda, Myers says, Laos is depicted as no more than a North Korean colony.

The DPRK's domestic propaganda also evidently flaunts the fact that the DPRK used deceit in its signing of the NPT (meaning, it signed the NPT with the intention of violating it).

Also, he notes that how could North Koreans retain their loyalty -- and their desire to liberate their Southern brethren -- now that the government admits to the South's prosperity? How could this be justified other than in ethnonationalistic terms?

I am still not entirely sold on what he is saying, but he certainly raises some points. I wish he wouldn't be so shady as to his mysterious sources (which he calls "The Text," referring to domestic North Korean propaganda which is not easily available to foreigners). I have a feeling that he makes up a lot of stuff.

I tried searching to see if Bruce Cumings (a DPRK admirer and renowned Korea historian) has written a review about this book, but I couldn't find any.

I say it's worth reading but not unless you supplement it with some other DPRK reading.

Ya Ali

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(salam)

Hey! I have not read this book yet. Someone recommended this book to me and haven't got time reading it. Do you think I should or should not read this?

Holden Caulfield is a lousy goddamned phoney!

I am continuing Iqtisaduna.

Iqtisaduna1cover.jpg

I moved on to Pt. 2 of Vol. 1.

Pt. 1 was essentially an overview of Marxist economic doctrine and a critical appraisal of it.

Pt. 2 gives a quick overview of capitalist economic doctrine and critically appraises it.

But more importantly, Islamic economic doctrine is finally brought into the mix. Shahid Sadr lays out certain principles in Islamic economics and contrasts them with that of Marxism and capitalism. For example, he states that Islamic economics presents the idea of double-ownership as a permanent principle. Whereas capitalist and Marxist economies accept this principle only as exceptions that are brought about by necessity (and which would be discarded if possible), Islam accepts both forms of ownership (private and public) as necessary for the economy.

Or, for example, Shahid Sadr mentions that Islamic economics is the subordination of economic "science" to ideological and human values. Meaning the economics in Islam is a means of reaching an ideological end, rather than being an end in and of itself.

In any case I liked Pt. 2 much better than Pt. 1, because the Shahid finally began assessing the Islamic economic doctrine.

The translation still sucks though. I mean no offense toward the people who worked hard to translate this book, but it's obvious that English is not their native tongue.

Ya Ali

Henry C. Carey's Harmony of Interests and Principles of Social Science, and Friedrich List's National System of Political Economics are recommended as a comparable Western perspective.

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Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East by Khaled Ahmed

9780195479560.jpg

Finished this and a few other books during my disappearance from this place and I find it appropriate to go through them one by one for the benefit of the thread.

The book I quoted is the most comprehensive and systematic account of the Pakistani Sectarian scene. It starts with the commentary on the country's national narrative constructed as years went on after the independence from Britain. The ideology was devised by the intelligentsia on the principle of exclusion of the minorities in the name of religion. It reached its high point against the anti-Ahmedi agitation and the consequent declaration of the said community as heretical sect and therefore outside the pale of Islam by an elected assembly. It was only the matter of time when the agitators who equated the truth of Islam with the tenets of their particular sect to take on other, so called non-orthodox minority Muslim sects. Shia of Pakistan, quite logically, became their next target.

The author explains the anti-Shia focus of Deobandi seminaries and religiopolitical parties of Pakistan. Three major factors contributed to the systematic targetting of Shia. 1) The Iranian Revolution and the fear of Saudi-led Sunni Arabs to counter it, 2) the rise to power of a "religiously minded", Deobandi (Wahhabi) Zia-ul-Haq and 3) Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the US-Saudi funded jihad to fight it.

Anti-Shia fataawa have always come from certain Deobandi seminaries of Pakistan in the 50s, 60s and 70s but they had had little effect on people and on the state machinery. But in 1986, an Indian Deobandi scholar called Manzur Numani, fearful of the Iranian Islamic Revolution and its outreach, published a collection of fataawa from the classical Sunni jurists to the modern times apostatising the Shia. (He previously wrote an anti-Khomeini book which was commissioned to be translated into Arabic and English, among other languages, by the Saudi funded Rabita `Alami Islami). His anti-Shia anthology of fataawa was welcomed in Pakistani Deobandi seminaries and widely circulated among Sunni masses. Sipah Sahaba Pakistan (SSP), the flagship Shia-killing politico-sectarian outfit, was created just the previous year with the tacit approval of Zia who was fearful of Iranian Revolution being spilled into Pakistan.

And then the mayhem started.

The author documents major Shia massacres of Saudi funded Deobandi outfits during the 1980s, including the Parachinar massacre and the Gilgit massacre of Isma'ili Shia. The Turi tribe of Shia in Parachinar (which borders Afghanistan and was a major supply route of so called mujahideen fighting the Soveits) were not cooperating with Saudi-Pakistani designed jihad as they naturally looked towards newly formed Shia Islamic government next door. For instance, the famous Allamah Arif Hussain Hussaini, later assassinated, was a Turi Shia with intimate ties with Khomeini.

The author is very clear about the Shia attacks on Sunnis/Wahhabis. He rightly says that whereas Deobandi militants sought to kill ordinary Shia en masse the Shia militatant outfit, which was formed to counter the killing of Shia and whose members were mostly trained in Iran, picked their targets carefully. They targeted and killed those Sunni elements which were responsible for inciting murder and took part in Shia killing.

In effect, the sectarian war in Pakistan of the 80s became an Iranian and Saudi proxy war as Deobandis were funded and trained by Saudi in collusion with Zia military apparatus and Shia militants naturally sought strength and money from Iranian revolutionary regime.

The last section of the book takes a critical look at the sectarian shade in the politics and practice of Al-Qaida. Khaled Ahmed is more explicit in linking the Shia killing in Pakistan (and outside Pakistan) in later years (post-9/11) with Al-Qaidah. He says that not many people see Al-Qaidah as a sectarian outfit but this is what it is. Bin Laden under the influence of Abdullah Azzam started off with targetting the "Crusaders and Zionists" but his so-called second in command, Ayman al-Zawahiri, shifted the priorities to targetting the "collaborators" of the "enemy". The so called collaborators included all Muslim governments, armies and non-orthodox Muslim sects who didn't share Al-Qaidah or Wahhabi belief in "Jihad". The man behind approving the views and conduct of Zarqawi in Iraq, who had a rabidly anti-Shia agenda, was no other thaan al-Zawahiri himself.

Even before that, holds the author, Al-Qaidah accepted and welcomed membership from militants who were part-time Shia killers in Pakistan and also those who took part in Shia massacres of Hazaras in Afghanistan under the Taliban rule. Thus the author establishes Al-Qaidah and its allied militant outfits as distinctively sectarian, and belonging overwhelmingly to the Deobani-AhleHadith ideology.

The book also includes a commentary on Deobani-Barelvi violence in which the same anti-Shia Deobani outfits (i.e. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi) were killing prominent Barelvi Sunnis because, to them, they weren't "Muslim enough".

-------

This book is written by a Sunni (Barelvi or Deobandi, it doesn't say) but the author doesn't mince his words; doesn't offer 'feel good' theories popular among the people and the media which deflect the blame from the culprits and put it on a few 'extremist miscreants' - or on the ubiquitous and equally mythical Western 'foreign hand' - who are bent on creating discord among two (or more) sects which are otherwise living in near-complete harmony.

The author is scathing in his indictment of the Deobani and Ahl-e-Hadith elements (The names for Salafi-Wahhabi nexus in Pakistan) and holds them responsible for turning Pakistan into a sectarian killing field. The book also puts the share of blame on the Pakistani rulers as well as its intelligence agencies for fostering 'strategic' ties with the openly sectarian militant outfits in the broader interests of the status quo while ignoring the plight of the common citizen, common Shia, and in some cases, common Sunnis too.

A must read for anyone wishing to make him or herself acquainted with the intricacies of Pakistani sectarian scene. I think it must be translated into Urdu so that it can reach the wider readership in Pakistan who sadly, as with other things, live in a jaahil, conspiratorial ignorance.

Publisher's Link : http://www.oup.com.pk/shopexd.asp?id=1926

Amazon Link: http://www.amazon.com/Sectarian-War-Pakistans-Sunni-Shia-Violence/dp/0195479564

Edited by Marbles

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I've just finished Room by Emma Donoghue.

It was very well written, a little emotionally overwhelming at times. There were just minor parts of the plot where I struggled to beleive how things turned out the way they did, but mostly the author was superbly convincing. I'd recommend it if you have enough time to complete it within a couple of days because it's not something you want to put down for too long and if you're not feeling manically depressed already.

I look forward to reading more from the author.

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This man is simply the most complete man. Period.

You mean an atheist?

A notorious ladiesman?

A man who -- in spite of all his talk of universal brotherhood and national liberation -- was racist towards the Congolese?

A man who ignored basic principles of cleanliness?

A man who, in spite of his brave facade, was a BURDEN on his partisan comrades in Bolivia, and who died on his knees in that country?

Yeah he did some good things as well (although he was more useful as an economic planner than as a partisan commander). But to call him the most complete man is completely ridiculous. He was a highly flawed man.

The most complete man was the Prophet of Islam (S).

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You mean an atheist?

Of-course. Your point?

A notorious ladiesman?

"Notorious ladiesman" don't desert their upper class comfortable lives to roam from one hellish place to another to fight for liberation of oppressed nation and races. "Notorious ladiesman" don't implement strict orders against the sexual perversion upon himself and his own unit in a place that was reduced into a brothel [if I can recall correctly, it was in Havana]. "Notorious ladiesman" don't show disdain [not just verbally, but through their live and deeds] for materialism and money.

Action speaks louder than words, dear sir.

A man who -- in spite of all his talk of universal brotherhood and national liberation -- was racist towards the Congolese?

If he really was racist towards the Congolese, why did he fought for them?

A man who ignored basic principles of cleanliness?

... So? And I hope you do realize that the man was living [or rather, fighting] under extremely harsh circumstances. AND I'm hypothetically agreeing with your assertion while giving my proposals, I'm unsure about the validity of your claims.

A man who, in spite of his brave facade, was a BURDEN on his partisan comrades in Bolivia, and who died on his knees in that country?

I'm totally unsure about the validity of your claims. Bolivian Communist Party turned their back on Che, he only had 24 men. His disguise was blown due to his comrades' carelessness. Fidel didn’t send the promised food, ammunition, medicines, equipments, anything that was necessary. Then local peasants played their part in making his quest impossible for him. The conditions were unbelievably harsh, no vegetation, no animals, no farmers, nothing. Che and his men were starving, sick, fever, under armed, hallucinating, exhausted etc, and Che himself lost half of his body-weight and also suffering from chronic asthma. And no, that's not it. He was going through a very dark period of his life [thanks to his mother's death and other personal hell he was going through]. But still, Che continued, which alone is a concrete proof of the man's dogged persistence and immeasurable determination[in the end, he was unable to fire his rifle due to a wound, yet he kept fighting]. But things doesn't end there, Tanya's [his comrade] blunder caused his enemies to ambush and wipe his entire unit. Che’s messenger and his own comrade [a peasant, who was on his side, outright sold-out and betrayed him] played their part in ruining his quest [which, if I can recall correctly, caused his capture]. Then there were factors such as Bolivian propaganda that further played it's part.

Such were the circumstances under which he was fighting. Despite of all of that, he always led from the front. He even anticipated the disastrous aftermath and wanted to leave Bolivia, but he decided to not leave his comrades behind and searched for them (causing his capture). I honestly don't think any of these actions of his makes him a "burden" on his men. In fact, it's quite the opposite.

And who's to say he died on his knees? His own executioner recalls his fearlessness towards the face of death. His legendary last words: "Shoot, coward, you're only going to kill a man." are another concrete proof that not only did his enemies failed to rattle his fighting spirit, but he rocked the entire Bolivian army through his courage. And his legacy and influence continues to defeat his enemies to this very day.

Yeah he did some good things as well (although he was more useful as an economic planner than as a partisan commander). But to call him the most complete man is completely ridiculous. He was a highly flawed man.

Anyone who can sacrifice his life for an ideal, the highest form of human, to solve human ills, is the most complete man in my book. Anyone who can stare death straight at the face is the most complete man in my book. Anyone who can abandon his desires and comforts of life for a greater good is the most complete man in my book. And more...

The most complete man was the Prophet of Islam (S).

Riiight. You do realize that everything you said [and more...] about Che can be applied to Prophet Muhammad as well?

Edited by The Exalted One

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