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In the Name of God بسم الله
Guest Dialectician

What Are You Reading Currently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]

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So, finally, after a 4-months long block I felt enough urge deep inside me to pick a book. And so I did. I wanted to read something light or familiar. So I bought this recently published book which interests me so much. It's the first of its kind in Pakistan written by a Pakistani and printed in Pakistan. Hmmm

Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East by Khaled Ahmed

Description from the Publisher:

This book is the first comprehensive account of how Pakistan became involved in sectarian terrorism starting in the 1980s. How was the state of Pakistan dragged into this terrorism? All Pakistanis want to know about the roots of today’s terrorism. This book lays bare the infrastructure of terror as it targeted the sects in its first phase. The demand for this book is going to be across the spectrum, from the scholar to the lay reader. It will make available the answers no one has tried to supply in the past.Weblink

This description doesn't explain the scope of the book. I will review it once I am done. I have read 1/4 and I find it remarkable coming from a Sunni. The guy is very objective in its assessment of the major reasons of the sectarianism in Pakistan which include Deobandi (Wahhabi-inspired) apostatisation and killings of Shia as well as Pakistan's logical progression toward a hardline Sunni state due to the national narrative the state developed soon after its independence. The high point of sectarianism during Zia's time gets most attention. I haven't read it yet so can't say.

I'd recommend it to every paki and to every concerned foreigner (except Iranians who are so full of themselves) who want to read up on the dynamics of sectarian conflict in Pakistan and it's fallout.

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Finished Reading "American Conspirices" by Jesse Ventura. Decent book. If you're interested in getting a intro into alternative - perhaps more evidence based - theories into the JFK, RFK, Lincoln assassination, then this book is good start. Also discusses the assassination of Malcolm X and MLK. No quesiton all the aforementioned individuals were assassinated by elements within the U.S Government. It's always interesting how in every assassination case, the modus operandi always involves a lone nut case. Very conveniant, but it's almost always is a false, fictional narrative. If one digs deeper, there are always other parties or individuals involved - which the media and "official" investigations fail to report on. The lone nuts also ends up having a history of involvement with the CIA, yet that also is ignored.

Readers are encouraged to read up on MK Ultra. CIA program to brainwash and hynotise people. Interesting to note how both Lee Harvey Oswald and Sirhan Sirhan showed evidence of being hypnotised.

Currently Reading "The Revolution - A Manifesto" By Ron Paul. Excellent read. Refreshing to hear a voice of reason in the U.S government when every politician seems to be towing the party line. There were some accusations that Ron Paul is a closet advocate of the Neoliberal worldview. Thankfully this book dispells that myth because Dr.Paul voices strong oppostion to the WTO, IMF and "free" trade agreements like NAFTA. Still, his advocacy of Austrian economics is troubling. HIs views, however, on domestic and foriegn policy are absolutely great. He tackles issues no other politician seems brave enough to discuss. His traveler dignity act in response to the embarrasingly undignifiying naked body scanners is much needed. Hopefully enough support is raised to pass through the act

An introduction to islamic sciences - Ayt. Muthahari

Im stuck on the 6th chapter of Malcom X's bio, i havent been able to find the time to carry on reading from where i left off (as enlightening as the first few chapters are).

All those i would be interested to know how the last book is '"The Turks Today', im really interested in the ethnic conflict and the cultural differences of the countries which used to be part of greater persia or the soviet, also the involvement of the turks and their political ideology since BC-to date.

I only found out recently that hte turks have a considerable role to play in islamic history as they were a main influence in the politics of the final abbasid khalifas, and some of them were even over thrown by turks, or placed in power by them.

Malcolm X's autobiography is an amazing book. Make sure you read the entire thing, especially the chapters detailing his trips to the Middle East and Africa. Very inspiring.

I'm in the initial phases of the book(The Turks Today) still because i've been reading other material as well. Only thing i recall the book mentioning concering ethnic conflicts was the Turkish-Greek conflict over the Cyrpus Islands.

The Turks obviously played an integral role in Islamic History, perhaps not so much in its initial phases as in the middle and latter phases of it's history.

Edited by Fiasco

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Why would I hang myself? I liked that book a lot.

:squeez:

"...Slowly, very slowly, like two unhurried compass needles, the feet turned towards the right; north, north-east, east, south-east, south, south-south-west; then paused, and, after a few seconds, turned as unhurriedly back towards the left. South-south-west, south, south-east, east. …"

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Thank God that we have such people to liberate Muslim women. :rolleyes:

That's one of the first things that came to my mind as well while i was reading the book. Ridiculously hypocritical

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What up, homos. Did you miss me?

:squeez:

"...Slowly, very slowly, like two unhurried compass needles, the feet turned towards the right; north, north-east, east, south-east, south, south-south-west; then paused, and, after a few seconds, turned as unhurriedly back towards the left. South-south-west, south, south-east, east. …"

I don't know what that's all about, but does this have anything to do with the fact that the Savage (in the book) hanged himself?

If so, then I gotta say:

1) That's haraam.

2) I am not one tenth the man that the Savage was. That dude was a straight G. I couldn't even hold his jockstrap.

Seyyed Ali Ghaderi, Khomeini Ruhollah: zendeginame-ye Emam Khomeini bar asas-e asnad va khaterat va khial, j. 1 (Khomeini Ruhollah: the Biography of Emam Khomeini according to historical archives, his memoirs, and his ideals, Vol. 1).

9643351971.240.jpg

John Erickson, The Road to Stalingrad

The-Road-to-Stalingrad-Stalin-s-War-with-Germany-Volume-One-Stalin-War-With-Germany-0300078129-L.jpg

I have temporarily suspended all efforts to read either of these two books. They are both incredibly dense, and the fact that they are both just the first of two volumes makes me want to vomit every time I try to open them up. It's a wonder that I even got through 150 pages of the Stalingrad book and 80 pages of the Emam book. I will save those ones for when somebody puts a gun to my head and forces me to read; that is the ideal circumstances for reading such books.

New book I am starting: Ebrahim Razzaghi, Ashnaei ba eghtesad-e iran (Introduction to Iranian Economics)

9643122727.240.jpg

It isn't a thousand pages long like those other books (280 pages if you don't count the tables; although, the text is pretty small), and it's a much more readable topic than military history or biographical history, so I expect to finish it fast.

Allotted time: one week. If I don't finish it within a week then I'm a failure in life.

Ya Ali

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G. Willow Wilson - Butterfly Mosque.

Its about her reversion to Islam and her marrying an egyptian man and living in Egypt.

I really reccommend it, it did bring a tear to my eye through the book, as i can connect to her.

inshallah more people read this book.

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New book I am starting: Ebrahim Razzaghi, Ashnaei ba eghtesad-e iran (Introduction to Iranian Economics)

9643122727.240.jpg

It isn't a thousand pages long like those other books (280 pages if you don't count the tables; although, the text is pretty small), and it's a much more readable topic than military history or biographical history, so I expect to finish it fast.

Allotted time: one week. If I don't finish it within a week then I'm a failure in life.

A week has passed, hasn't it?

Yeah well I got through about 20 pages before putting it down. I haven't picked it up in a few days.

I have no intention of finishing that book.

I have now started reading the Farsi translation of Usool al-Kafi. I am 50 pages into the first volume. I am pretty sure I will eventually abandon this as well.

I'm tired of reading. I can't get through books anymore.

Once I abandon Kafi I think I'm gonna start reading Pt. 2 of Vol. 1 of Iqtisaduna.

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Just read A fine balance by Rohinton Mistry. Extremely depressing but makes you think about a lot of stuff going on around us. I think it should esp be read by people from south asia.

A Fine Balance, critically Mistry's most successful work to date, tells the story of four characters (Maneck, Dina, Ishvar and Omprakash ) and the impact of Indira Ghandhi's state of emergency on them. One of the most successful aspects of this book is its carefully crafted prose:

The morning express bloated with passengers slowed to a crawl, then lurched forward suddenly, as though to resume full speed. The train's brief deception jolted its riders. The bulge of humans hanging out of the doorway distended perilously, like a soap bubble at its limit.

This intricate opening paragraph, which is typical of the precise prose of A Fine Balance throughout, helps propel the novel forward through what is one of the most memorable portraits of post-Independence India ever written.

Will probably start on No space for Further Burials by Feryal Ali Gauhar

Edited by farwa

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i was reading Hamid Dabashi's "Iran - A people interrupted", but this guy seems to hate everyone and everything. I don't what point this guy is trying to make. Great command over the English language though.

Also read Muhammad Ali's "The Soul of a butterfly". Definitely recommended. He's really candid and open in his book about his fights, his fears, his accomplishments, his spirituality. Heck, you would think you're reading a Sufi manual when reading this book.

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Man, i used this thread as motivation to read more. But people just stopped posting! You guys suck.

i would agree with u on this, ppl jus don't post here often now, this thread was much better before

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