Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله
Guest Dialectician

What Are You Reading Currently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

On ‎8‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 1:44 AM, LeftCoastMom said:

I was grousing to

Thanks for the new word. When l first read it l thought it meant 'calling', like this: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruffed_Grouse/sounds .

Kinda like a Tom-Tom communication.

l wasn't aware the word is also used for 'complaining'.  :sorry:

Ahamduallah, Man has dictionaries.

Now what would l think if you wrote 'smoking'? l, myself, do not read smoke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently on my desk:

  • Arabian Sands, by Wilferd Thesiger (AKA Mubarak b. London). A British explorer who volunteered to do a survey of desert locusts in the Rub' al-Khali after WWII. He spent time with the Rashid and Bayt Kthir bedouins, this book is his travelogue of crossing the Rub' al-Khali (or Rimal) desert with them. About a third done this work, fascinating read about a corner of the world before globalization hit it.
  • The Mongols and the Islamic World: From Conquest to Conversion, by Peter Jackson (no, not that one). Absolutely fascinating work, currently in the first chapter where he deals with the Muslim reactions to the Mongol expansions. I had no idea that Ibn Abi l-Hadid, Yaqut al-Hamawi, and Ibn al-Athir had all made some mention of the expansions. 
  • Old Nubian Texts from Qasr Ibrim 1, by J. Martin Plumley & Gerald M. Browne. A collection of manuscripts from Qasr Ibrim in southern Egypt written in the Old Nubian language, I found out about this language a few months ago and have been trying to get resources on it. It seems to have been the ancestor of modern Nubian languages spoken along the Nile in southern Egypt and the northern Sudan (some now under danger from being replaced by Arabic). When the area converted to Christianity in late antiquity they started writing down Christian material, a lot of which seems to be local. It was due to texts and inscriptions like these that we, thankfully, have knowledge of this medieval language. The book gives the text typed up in the Nubian script, a translation, notes, and provides a facsimile of the original document. I think thirteen documents are covered in total.
  • The Crucible of Islam, by G. W. Bowersock. This is a small book (two hundred or so pages) on the late antique context in which Islam emerged, covers important topics like religion in Arabia, South Arabia and Ethiopia, the city of Mecca, etc. It's a real page turner, I've finished about half of it. I'd recommend this to people to get an understanding of the pre-Islamic history of Arabia and the Middle East that was the milieu Islam came from and to become introduced to understand the thinking of academics regarding late antiquity and early Islam.
  • Kitab al-Khaza'in, by al-Mawla Ahmad b. Mahdi al-Naraqi. This is light reading I come to every now and then, a collection of small stories, poetry, and jokes in Arabic and Farsi. It's a nice change to take a break from other readings and the school books I'll be having to go through starting next week ( :( ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Journey to the end of Islam" by Michael Muhammad Knight

 

Fantastic book (I like most of his work) covering his tour with a group of Muslim rock bands throughout several countries and trying to come to terms with Muslim identity (as he's American.) He explores many facets of Islam, from the ultra-conservatism in Sunni Islam, to some of our more controversial sects in Shia, the book culminates in his pilgrimage to Mecca. The book is a personal journey and offers room for us too, to reflect on Islam in the 21st century - both the good and the bad. Ultimately, it's trying to love and do Allah's Will, while making sense of the modern world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Hate you Give

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32075671-the-hate-you-give

I just started it this morning. The chapters are short but I have to stop to collect my emotions at the end of each. This book is intense. I'm afraid to read what happens next and can't put it down. 

The writing might be challenging for people whose first language isn't English or who are unfamiliar with the urban patois. Even I, a well-read hillbilly from the southern end of the Appalachians, wouldn't want to be forced to read it aloud. So far it's really good though, at least up to chapter 4. Eye opening, even. 

They made a movie of it. I haven't seen the movie. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/15/2019 at 11:44 AM, notme said:

Read it. But not if you don't want to care. It'll tear you up and you'll come out the other side changed. 

Well, you might. I suppose it might not have such an impact on people who can't say "that could have been me but for fortunate (or unfortunate) birth". 

-------

Up next: A People's History of the United States

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2767.A_People_s_History_of_the_United_States

I haven't started it yet, but it was the suggested first book for a community activist reading group that hasn't formed yet. It was on my "to read" list anyway. I'm more a pacifist than an activist, but I can read and talk. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still reading A People's History of the United States, but I also started reading Kindred, by Octavia Butler. 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/60931.Kindred

It's classified as sci-fi, but it's not really. There's time travel, but it's more like speculative historical fiction. 

 

Edited by notme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The following quotation is from a review of the book, 'A world without Islam' by G. Fuller:

https://www.amazon.co.United Kingdom/dp/B00FOQSFX4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Quote

Christianity and Islam are significant shifts away from the previous forms of social bonding that emphasized kinship. Multiple layers of "social glue," including language, behavioral norms, dress and sacred rituals, define individual membership in a group and distinguish groups from each other. The social glue that is culture is influenced by local conditions but is also a reflection of the group's inherited tendencies. A shared, common culture facilitates in-group cooperation and altruism, serving to perpetuate the group's unique genes in a world of competing groups striving for control of limited resources. The universality emphasized by Christianity and Islam displaced kinship and extended cooperation, altruism and resources to persons outside the kinship group, thereby decreasing Darwinian competition and the survival of unique genes. The ultimate Darwinian impact of insular, ethnic religions, such as the pre-Christian and pre- Islamic Semitic tribal religions, was the propagation of their unique clusters of genes. With the application of altruism to strangers, and the introduction of other behaviors that do not promote in-group interests, what is the ultimate genetic impact of Christianity and Islam?

Hama, Aldric.The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies; Washington Vol. 36, Iss. 2,  (Summer 2011): 256-262.

FWIW, this is a review of the book from the Amazon site:

Quote

This is an exceptional book. I can read over and over again. It lays history of political conflicts to the reader in a way so neutral and capturing. The book is enlightening and revealing. It just makes you understand that it's not religions that drive us mad, but it's politics and what type of power we seek in the world. The book is not with Islam nor against it. It just shows you that the conflict in the Middle East, that started with the Crusades, would've happened whether Islam existed or not. The issue is purely political. I recommend the book very highly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, strength=Abbas said:

Oh man! This is the book that inspired my friend to become a Shia !!

It's (Lantern On The Path) one of my all-time favorite books, it's so great. Very dense in it's explanations of it's topics, very eloquent like Imam Ali ((صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم)) as well. Imam al-Sadiq is one of my favorite Imams to read probably because of that, he speaks directly to me. 

I casually share excerpts from that book with one of my non-Muslim friends (a Pagan actually) and she is always completely amazed by stuff we have in Islam, deeply rewarding reading!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...