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imran7

Most Non-muslims Converts Are Not Shiite - Why?

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in a wahabi mosque if u wanna get info about their religion u have to wear ur pants high or else if they find out ur shia their will be deep consequenses

yup! piousness is measure by the height of the pyjma, i have to mention that pant is haram for them, if one wants to wear pant then it can be wear only under that maxi like dress, its then halal i guess.

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Also, foreign dress is obligatory, especially if it makes you stick out like a sor thumb when you walk down the street.

Because, of course, in Islam, it is the outside that matters.

any thing which wahabi mullahs can not understand, is haram, thats the most simple rule they have. any thing which fly above their head is haram, no need to think about it.

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I can tell you for a fact that the only Shia I am able to locate within a three hour drive of where I live are unfriendly and do not want me to join them. I do not know if they are just normally antisocial, or they repelled me because I am a revert, or if they repelled me because I am an unmarried woman. They did email me a newsletter every month, though, until I quit using that email address.

I feel same as you! The women in hussainia are unfriendly most of them. They are only talking with each other and don't speak a word to me. if they do it's only those few I have known long time but they only say salamu alaykoum and how are you and then they talk with their own people.If i am talking to one and an arabic sister interfere in the conversation the arabic sister i talk to break what I say to her and starts talking to the other arabic sister. VERY IRRITATING AND VERY RUDE!!!It happens either I am married or not.Many they don't know either english or norwegian.Only arabic cause they have not gone to classes to learn norwegian...

Edited by ummleyla

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Well, here's a groundbreaking idea that does not even require highly organized dawa squads. If you're in America, or Canada, or the UK, where the language is English, run programs at centres predominantly in English. Don't hire speakers or scholars who can't speak the language of the country they're going to be living in. Have open houses and advertise them by dropping leaflets in the houses in the neighborhood, as well as in neighborhood houses of worship. There are tonnes of our books translated to English; buy some, and have them available to buy or borrow in your library.

This is not rocket science, but these are common sense things that Wahhabis have at least enough functioning brain cells to figure out. Going out actively to preach to the masses takes some organization, but the bare minimum we can do is at least be OPEN and WELCOMING to the masses.

Alaikum salaaam,

SPOT ON!

This is something that bothers me a lot. I was determined to find a group of Shia Moslems near where I live and have found a small Hussaynia alhamdulillah. We go for Friday prayers and important days. The people there are friendly and welcoming and although they can speak English and do to me and my husband the khutba is in Arabic and Urdu, no English!!!!!

Before we found this group we had a choice of 2 mosques for Friday prayers:

1. A sunni mosque where the people were ok, just gave a weird look at me when I used my turbah, but generally besides the bits of Arabic I could just about make it (from my limited Arabic) from the thick Pakistani accent, the rest of the stuff was in Urdu and I just had to sit and do tasbih during this time.

2. A sunni Wahabi mosque (the main central mosque of course) where I don't even agree with some of the stuff said in the khutba but at least it is in a language I understand! Yes the Wahabis have their khutba in Arabic and ENGLISH and have open days and exhibitions during the festival time so they are the main point of call for anyone wanting to learn about Islam. And have the only mosque in my city that actually is recognisable as a mosque, so as a non-Moslem you would probably approach them first. I mean how would you know the other places existed?

I preferred just to go to the Urdu place. So great now we have a Husayni, but the other week for the day of Seyyeda Fatimah Zahra's (as) martyrdom, we went there and the event went on for several hours. I couldn't really appreciate/participate because it was mostly in Urdu. Sure I got the gist as I know what happened and can't help but well with tears at the names of Ali (as), Fatimah (as) and Hossein (as) but it sure was a strain sitting through a couple of hours of Urdu. It would have been better in Arabic in my opinion - at least it would have helped me improve my Arabic which is important for my advancement in Islam.

Whenever I visit London (which I do not like having to do) I go to Maida Vale to the Iranian mosque there. I speak Farsi, so feel more at home, but my husband does not speak Farsi, but so much is in English there and the organisers all seem to speak English. It is also extremely clean, with a nice garden at the front and inside is also clean and well organised. I wish there were more places like this around the UK. For example we often visit Leicester and I searched the Internet for a shia place to go and pray and found somewhere and there was an event on for that evening, but again all the advertising etc. seemed to be in Urdu (I am presuming Urdu or other Asian language), so in the end we decided against it. The last thing you want is to be stuck in a room with people who may or may not be hostile to you as the only white people, but not even understanding what they are saying. Which by the way I absolutely accept if I am abroad. We had the fortune to be able to visit the Blue Mosque in Istanbul for Ashura. The khutba was in Arabic and then Turkish - exactly as I would have expected. But imaging a Turkish visitor attending a mosque in the UK - they would find the talks not in Arabic and English, but in a language they did not know!

So as an English-speaking British born Moslem it is very frustrating to have Islamic events, Friday prayer sermons in a language other than English or Arabic. Also many 'imams' I have come across in the normal sunni community have either no or limited English and it is the Wahabbis that seem to love speaking in English.

Another example: we go on residential Quranic Arabic courses every so often - the courses and teacher are great, but the other participants are usually a strange mix, with always a couple of hard-core Wahabbis there at least. Last course my husband sat next to one of these Wahabbi men (Pakistani background) who told my husband that as well as learning Arabic for obvious reasons, he was also trying to learn Hebrew so he can go out there and preach to the Jews about where they are wrong.

These people have 'dawa tables' every week. I swear I had never heard of a 'dawa table' until I went to Leicester!!!!! The first time I was asked if we had a dawa table I honestly thought they were talking about furniture!!!! and then thought it was like 'the round table' i.e. some sort of meeting and then gradually realised that they were these annoying people with the long beards who look like Taliban extremists that stand in shopping centres with a table of Islamic literature. Believe me these people are so active it is frightening.

What is also frightening is that I keep meeting so many new Moslems who have come to Islam and then are snatched up quickly by these people who relish in telling them what is right and wrong in Islam and all about deviant groups (Shia of course). A young female convert on this last course told me my tasbih were haram, the fact that another elderly sister laughed and told a harmless joke was haram, it went on and on. She never once stopped to think that the elderly lady she criticised was a born Moslem (Shaafi sunni) in her mid 60s and I am 49 and converted at 16 so together we may have more knowledge or experience than her. No, she had been taught by the true and pure Moslems - the Wahabbis - so she must be right. So many criticisms and she had no idea I was shia at this stage - it was simple things like tasbih or laughing set her off. I sometimes wonder if they had such wild lives before that maybe Wahabbism and its rigidity is appealing to them?

But sorry for rambling, back to the point - yes, if more information,talks, meetings by the shia brothers and sisters were in ENGLISH or the language of the country they resided in, they would have more chance to get the real message across. I would love to be more involved in this myself, but guess what, I have tried to contact centres to study further so I may subsequently inform people, but everything is down in London or not in English or emails don't get replied to! grrrrrr But I look at this as a test of sabr/patience. I will carry on studying quietly at home, visiting shiachat for bits of extra info. and insha'Allah even on an informal level I may be able to pass on some little bits of information to new Moslems, but I have to say it is very hard once they have already been brainwashed.

OK rant over!

Allah hafez

Fatimeh

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(salam)

Non shias converts mostly do salafi wahhabi coz thats what the theme of the Quran seems to be in their eyes, Allah Allah and only Allah.

Also, Wahhabis are like a record player, repeating its propaganda over and over and over and over and over.

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wa alaaykum salaam wr wb

I thank Allah swt I am not a salafi/wahabi!

I am revert/convert to Islam. When I first became Muslim I heard lots of bad things about Shias. I think many people are scared off from even looking into Shia beliefs by all the crazy nonsense. But alhumdooleluh I happened to know a few Muslims who were Shia so I had the sense to see that they didn't exactly fit all the garbage said about them - so I had an open mind as I began to learn more about Islam and I made sure to look in to Shia beliefs. It was truly the only thing that made sense - I don't understand how anyone can be Sunni and be satisfied with their deen - I would still feel so lost like I had not found what I was looking for, still without Truth, if I had not been able to learn about ahlulbayt (as) - so thank Allah swt for ahlulbayt (as), alhumdooleluh.

Another reason why many converts/reverts are not Shia is that they have a heck of a hard time, in many cases, finding Shias who will actually talk to them. I've heard countless stories from reverts actually trying to find a Shia masjid only to have their phone calls never returned, etc., and some people do not manage to do it on their own without some connection to actual real live other Shias who will at least somewhat accept them into their fold.

(salam)

Non shias converts mostly do salafi wahhabi coz thats what the theme of the Quran seems to be in their eyes, Allah Allah and only Allah.

Also, Wahhabis are like a record player, repeating its propaganda over and over and over and over and over.

Edited by otowi

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I do think salafis keep repeating that Shias are wrong and that only people that are right are those that follow the Qur'an and Sunnah.

I have been talking to some Sunnis and Salafis (I think), While they dont directly criticize shia and shia muslim's beliefs, they also dont engage in direct debates or answer my questions about shia/sunni difference, question about using Reason and such, rather they provide links to websites (which only parrot what sunni or salafi beliefs are)

They dont want to directly say this is what I believe and this is right because of so and so.

People want to learn the basics of Islam, the way they are taught (by these websites or people doing dawah) is simple and so many people convert to Sunni or Salafi path of Islam.

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I am a revert and I reverted directly as Shia. The person who helped me most was Sunni, but not opposed to me studying and practicing in the right way. I found these websites to chat with other Shia people, which helps me quite a bit. I can't drive so can't even get to our tiny little group of Shia people who meet at someone's house every Friday. What convinced me that Shia was right was copious amounts of research over about ten years before I even said shahada. True, not many people are willing to do that, but if anyone discusses it with me out of interest, I can help them along the right path. Allah (Ta'aalaa) put me here for a purpose, led me to the right path for a purpose, filled me with what little knowledge I have for a purpose, and enables me to communicate with other shia for a purpose. I await.

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I am a revert and I reverted directly as Shia. The person who helped me most was Sunni, but not opposed to me studying and practicing in the right way. I found these websites to chat with other Shia people, which helps me quite a bit. I can't drive so can't even get to our tiny little group of Shia people who meet at someone's house every Friday. What convinced me that Shia was right was copious amounts of research over about ten years before I even said shahada. True, not many people are willing to do that, but if anyone discusses it with me out of interest, I can help them along the right path. Allah (Ta'aalaa) put me here for a purpose, led me to the right path for a purpose, filled me with what little knowledge I have for a purpose, and enables me to communicate with other shia for a purpose. I await.

sorry for not sticking to the thread.

Abdul Hamid, would you please check my profile and email me at the address listed on my profile so I may ask you some questions. I am on my spiritual journey and need some help. (I am basic member and cannot do PM or send email via SC. Thanks)

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apologies if this has been mentioned (i didnt read through all of it:blush:)

btw this has nothing to do with the question..

anyways, if u look at the way i do.. there are more christains than muslims why is that? does that mean we muslims are incorrect? No. well, with sunnism and shiasm its the same.. there are more sunnis then there are shias. does that make us shia incorrect? No. in my opinion if sunnis would look/ view this way maybe they would think twice about their religion..

(wasalam)

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Alaikum salaaam,

SPOT ON!

This is something that bothers me a lot. I was determined to find a group of Shia Moslems near where I live and have found a small Hussaynia alhamdulillah. We go for Friday prayers and important days. The people there are friendly and welcoming and although they can speak English and do to me and my husband the khutba is in Arabic and Urdu, no English!!!!!

Before we found this group we had a choice of 2 mosques for Friday prayers:

1. A sunni mosque where the people were ok, just gave a weird look at me when I used my turbah, but generally besides the bits of Arabic I could just about make it (from my limited Arabic) from the thick Pakistani accent, the rest of the stuff was in Urdu and I just had to sit and do tasbih during this time.

2. A sunni Wahabi mosque (the main central mosque of course) where I don't even agree with some of the stuff said in the khutba but at least it is in a language I understand! Yes the Wahabis have their khutba in Arabic and ENGLISH and have open days and exhibitions during the festival time so they are the main point of call for anyone wanting to learn about Islam. And have the only mosque in my city that actually is recognisable as a mosque, so as a non-Moslem you would probably approach them first. I mean how would you know the other places existed?

I preferred just to go to the Urdu place. So great now we have a Husayni, but the other week for the day of Seyyeda Fatimah Zahra's (as) martyrdom, we went there and the event went on for several hours. I couldn't really appreciate/participate because it was mostly in Urdu. Sure I got the gist as I know what happened and can't help but well with tears at the names of Ali (as), Fatimah (as) and Hossein (as) but it sure was a strain sitting through a couple of hours of Urdu. It would have been better in Arabic in my opinion - at least it would have helped me improve my Arabic which is important for my advancement in Islam.

Whenever I visit London (which I do not like having to do) I go to Maida Vale to the Iranian mosque there. I speak Farsi, so feel more at home, but my husband does not speak Farsi, but so much is in English there and the organisers all seem to speak English. It is also extremely clean, with a nice garden at the front and inside is also clean and well organised. I wish there were more places like this around the UK. For example we often visit Leicester and I searched the Internet for a shia place to go and pray and found somewhere and there was an event on for that evening, but again all the advertising etc. seemed to be in Urdu (I am presuming Urdu or other Asian language), so in the end we decided against it. The last thing you want is to be stuck in a room with people who may or may not be hostile to you as the only white people, but not even understanding what they are saying. Which by the way I absolutely accept if I am abroad. We had the fortune to be able to visit the Blue Mosque in Istanbul for Ashura. The khutba was in Arabic and then Turkish - exactly as I would have expected. But imaging a Turkish visitor attending a mosque in the UK - they would find the talks not in Arabic and English, but in a language they did not know!

So as an English-speaking British born Moslem it is very frustrating to have Islamic events, Friday prayer sermons in a language other than English or Arabic. Also many 'imams' I have come across in the normal sunni community have either no or limited English and it is the Wahabbis that seem to love speaking in English.

Another example: we go on residential Quranic Arabic courses every so often - the courses and teacher are great, but the other participants are usually a strange mix, with always a couple of hard-core Wahabbis there at least. Last course my husband sat next to one of these Wahabbi men (Pakistani background) who told my husband that as well as learning Arabic for obvious reasons, he was also trying to learn Hebrew so he can go out there and preach to the Jews about where they are wrong.

These people have 'dawa tables' every week. I swear I had never heard of a 'dawa table' until I went to Leicester!!!!! The first time I was asked if we had a dawa table I honestly thought they were talking about furniture!!!! and then thought it was like 'the round table' i.e. some sort of meeting and then gradually realised that they were these annoying people with the long beards who look like Taliban extremists that stand in shopping centres with a table of Islamic literature. Believe me these people are so active it is frightening.

What is also frightening is that I keep meeting so many new Moslems who have come to Islam and then are snatched up quickly by these people who relish in telling them what is right and wrong in Islam and all about deviant groups (Shia of course). A young female convert on this last course told me my tasbih were haram, the fact that another elderly sister laughed and told a harmless joke was haram, it went on and on. She never once stopped to think that the elderly lady she criticised was a born Moslem (Shaafi sunni) in her mid 60s and I am 49 and converted at 16 so together we may have more knowledge or experience than her. No, she had been taught by the true and pure Moslems - the Wahabbis - so she must be right. So many criticisms and she had no idea I was shia at this stage - it was simple things like tasbih or laughing set her off. I sometimes wonder if they had such wild lives before that maybe Wahabbism and its rigidity is appealing to them?

But sorry for rambling, back to the point - yes, if more information,talks, meetings by the shia brothers and sisters were in ENGLISH or the language of the country they resided in, they would have more chance to get the real message across. I would love to be more involved in this myself, but guess what, I have tried to contact centres to study further so I may subsequently inform people, but everything is down in London or not in English or emails don't get replied to! grrrrrr But I look at this as a test of sabr/patience. I will carry on studying quietly at home, visiting shiachat for bits of extra info. and insha'Allah even on an informal level I may be able to pass on some little bits of information to new Moslems, but I have to say it is very hard once they have already been brainwashed.

OK rant over!

Allah hafez

Fatimeh

u r sooo very right re: wahabis and their dawa techniques

i love ur posts! i find u sooo inspirational....i could jus read wat u have to say all day long!

u have a new stalker

wow i didnt know they did stuff in the blue mosque on ashura - im PLEASANTLY surprised

u truely are blessed - converted from the age of 16 in the uk...and u r now a lover of the ahlulbayt....may ur love for them increase.ameen..Allah bless x

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my experience - at least in america - is that sunnis tend to be friendly, welcoming, nonjudgmental, and embrace the "new muslim" immediately as a brother or sister who is equal in status. they more often abide by the principle that "all muslims are brothers and sisters no matter where you come from" and are much more likely to include new converts socially.

on the other hand, most of the shi'a communities i have seen tend to be very paranoid, stand-offish and socially exclusive. it takes a lot of social work just to be accepted in most shi'a groups. particularly among women. it shouldn't have to be like that. there are exceptions of course but i find this to be more common. i remember i had a shi'a friend once who actually started participating in sunni activities just to feel a sense of "sisterhood" even though she didn't share their beliefs.

in addition, i remember when i used to be a sunni, i used to ask shi'a questions about shi'a islam... and i would get nothing in response. it really frustrated me. to this day, i don't know whether they were engaging in taqiyyah, or they just really didn't know how to answer my questions.

also, as br kadhim said, the language issue is paramount... if all the shia lectures are in languages that potential converts do not understand, they're not going to benefit... just having to sit through a lecture in a completely unfamiliar language can weird new converts out since everything is so new to them

assalamu alaikum

What happens sometimes is that families make pragmatic decisions. They see their children will not be accepted in the immigrant communities so they go to the sunni one where they will be accepted. I have seen families that had become shia who then left and became sunni for this very reason. They say no way that their children would stay muslim in such an atmosphere.

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(salam) There are a couple points id like 2 make...

1) Firstly, Shias tend to try and convert sunnis more than they try to convert Non-Muslims... Dont know why this is though... Maybe since they a bigger threat.

2) Secondly, Non-Muslim converts are mostly familiar with Sunnism, and since we have been stereotyped by the Sunnis as the "wrong path", and with what is said in the media... Non-Muslim converts rarely tend to read up on Shiaism... Until after they come in contact with a Shia, where point 1 happens lol

May Allah put every and keep everyone onthe right path Inshallah

Ya Ali Madad

In India during Muharrum Hindus mourn, recite nauha and distribute tabarrukh. Every one loves Imam Hussain A.S. and are shia by heart.

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(salam)

Non shias converts mostly do salafi wahhabi coz thats what the theme of the Quran seems to be in their eyes, Allah Allah and only Allah.

Also, Wahhabis are like a record player, repeating its propaganda over and over and over and over and over.

assalamu alaikum

The reason so many become wahabis is because the wahabis are very active dawa wise and will become instant friends to newcomers. The others pretty much ignore new people.

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assalamu alaikum

The reason so many become wahabis is because the wahabis are very active dawa wise and will become instant friends to newcomers. The others pretty much ignore new people.

That's right sister! i feel they ignore me in shia hussainias while in Rabita which is run by the salafis who hate shia many are very friendly to me. And the the guy i knew was friendly too, trying to make me a salafi. Sent info about salafi beliefs and stuff.He didn't know I was a shia cause i said i was "just muslim".I became shia without being sunni first but I read about it. I found shia more logic so chose shia alhamdulillah.Just to bad the original shias don't treat the converts more nice. F.ex I am never invited to anyone at f.ex iftar in ramadan even many know I am alone. I have a husband but he is not here.The iraqis are only with iraqis. I don't have so much contact with converts either.F.ex there are many unmarried men in hussainia.When I was single NOBODY of the sisters cared to help me finding a good husband among the brothers.They think the iraqi men are for the iraqi women only.If one convert marry an iraqi guy it will be one less man for the unmarried iraqi women in iraq who need to get out .....Iraqi women prefer iraqi men before other natioalities. My iranian ex husband is married to a iraqi woman but her brother in law didn't accept it at all. He wanted her to marry an iraqi man.She is exception of those who marry another than iraqi man.If I didn't find the one I am married to now who knows,maybe I would end up marrying a sunni. And end up as sunni myself .Yikes.But I don't think so....I follow what Sistani says about it. If she fears she will lose her shia faith,that she will be misled,it's haram for a shia female to marry a sunni male.Some they say I should convert to sunni from shia. :o Majority who convert convert to sunni cause they maybe have a sunni man and those who don't have husband they hav friends who are sunni. They only read about sunni and then convert. They don't read about both sects first like I did.But some dothat though. Those who chose shia direct without being sunni first.Many who convert become hardcore salafias. I now one who did,but she dropped out and is now just a normal sunni.She doesn't hate shia anymore like before.She was salafi just a short while.

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umm then why do athiests most of the times convert to christianity

hmm most of the atheists and agnostics that I've met have all left or rejected Christianity because once logic is applied, the religion falls apart. I know a few people and have heard of many more who even went to seminary (Christian religious school) who came out atheist or agnostic and are completely lost, as they couldn't continue justifying all the beliefs that just aren't logical. In fact, I had started off college with the intent of becoming a Christian missionary, but as my unanswered questions grew, I realized I could never tell someone that their beliefs are 'wrong' when I can't even understand my own.

Nevertheless, I think part of the reason why so many Americans fall into this category of belief (agnosticism especially) is that Christianity is all they know and are familiar with.

Further, in response to the original post, I agree with everyone else that other reverts I've heard of or met reverted to Islam after reading the Quran, not because of Sunna beliefs in particular. Personally, before I was even interested in Islam, I had done some reading on it as I had several Muslim students and wanted to know more about their beliefs - I was completely turned off by what I read, only realizing later that what I had read was all Sunna beliefs (which is the most accesible). It was no different, if not worse, than Christianity - full of inconsistencies, discrepancies, errors, blasphemy against God, the prophet, and the Quran... no thanks. Certainly seemed like a man-made religion to me. When I began reading about the different sects and their beliefs did everything in my life start changing.

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(salam)

As you know, the Sunni majority have historically been the predominant ruling authority over Muslim masses, controlling the instruments of information propagation and the channels of communication. The outnumbered Shi'ahs on the other hand have throughout Muslim history been a suppressed minority with no voice with which to disseminate the faith. It's natural then that the Ahl al-Sunnah constitute the vast majority of Muslims today.

Having said that, the condition of the Shi'ah minority has improved greatly in modern history, with the establishment of the first Shi'i Islamic state, the empowerment of Shi'ahs in Iraq for the first time and also those in Lebanon. There is also exposure via larger Shi'i populations in Western centres such as London, Dearborne, Sydney and Toronto. These developments have no doubt resulted in greater awareness of Shi'i Islam in the world. I'm reminded of one hadith here:

Imam Sadiq [as] says:

Very soon Kufa will be empty of the believers. [Religious] knowledge will disappear from that region the way a snake disappears from its abode into a hole in the earth, [without leaving any trace]. Then it will reappear in the city known as Qumm. That city will become the treasure of religious knowledge and excellence. From there it will spread throughout the world, thoroughly eliminating ignorance in matters of religion among the destitute, including women [who will participate in this process of learning anew about Islam].

... Religious knowledge will spread across nations from Qumm and God's proof will have been provided to all people in such a way that there will not be a single person on earth who will not have heard about the religion and its wisdom. It will be following this event that our Qa'im will appear. God's punishment and tribulation will be ready for execution, because God exacts His revenge only when the people have rejected His proof.

-Safinat al-bihar, hadith related under 'Qumm.'

This is not to say we should be complacent. In comparison to the Sunni brethren our dissemination campaign is weak and it lacks enthusiasm and also a real sense of brotherhood and hospitality. Success here is then a combination of not just quantity but also of quality and on that basis we ought to become more active on the community, social, public and media levels.

To the brothers and sisters I would say that university is an excellent place to start participating in Shi'i awareness activities, via religious and cultural societies. For many who involve themselves in these uni. campaigns valuable experience is gained which rather than wasted can be usefully channelled into charities, groups and organisations outside of university. These could be established and operated by volunteers from the younger generation, who better understand the society and who can better tailor their activities to cater for the communities as well as reach out to non-Muslims.

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Well, there are more sunnis than shias, so reverts have more access to sunnis than to shias. Not to mention the sunnis around here are like some jehovah's witness wannabes, its embaressing i swear.

I must interrupt, that statement was uncalled for, if our sunni brothers like to propagate the deen of Muhammad :s:, it is because they love their faith, theres nothing to be faulted in them doing so...

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salam

completley agree on that, the magnetic attraction that the Islamic concept of tawheed + not having to deny Jesus (as) gets shattered by people who prefer Ya Ali from Ya Allah (swt) and elevate shrines to that of kabba. It is sad indeed, and perhaps the reason many find themselves turning to salaf sects instead of shi'i school of thought.

i think we can conter balance this by showing people that our concept of Allah is much more rational at a philosophical level. eg we dont believe that we can see Allah with our EYES on the day of judgement and we dont have ahadith which say that Allah has body parts.

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hmm most of the atheists and agnostics that I've met have all left or rejected Christianity because once logic is applied, the religion falls apart. I know a few people and have heard of many more who even went to seminary (Christian religious school) who came out atheist or agnostic and are completely lost, as they couldn't continue justifying all the beliefs that just aren't logical. In fact, I had started off college with the intent of becoming a Christian missionary, but as my unanswered questions grew, I realized I could never tell someone that their beliefs are 'wrong' when I can't even understand my own.

Nevertheless, I think part of the reason why so many Americans fall into this category of belief (agnosticism especially) is that Christianity is all they know and are familiar with.

Further, in response to the original post, I agree with everyone else that other reverts I've heard of or met reverted to Islam after reading the Quran, not because of Sunna beliefs in particular. Personally, before I was even interested in Islam, I had done some reading on it as I had several Muslim students and wanted to know more about their beliefs - I was completely turned off by what I read, only realizing later that what I had read was all Sunna beliefs (which is the most accesible). It was no different, if not worse, than Christianity - full of inconsistencies, discrepancies, errors, blasphemy against God, the prophet, and the Quran... no thanks. Certainly seemed like a man-made religion to me. When I began reading about the different sects and their beliefs did everything in my life start changing.

Welcome to islam sister! I would suggest you go here: http://revertmuslims.com/forum/index.php

Its a forum designed by reverts to islam for reverts to islam. You will meet many converts there whom can share their experiences with you and help you along this new path in life

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i remember when i first converted i had to ask the shia alim if shias even wanted converts. i contacted him, and i was expecting a christian-like experience where i make the first call and then he would start inviting me to all these events and such. not like that at all. he was always available when i wanted to talk to him, but he never called me. this is exactly what i needed. i didn't want to be proselytized, i wanted it to be on my own terms and at my own pace.

i went to both sunni and shi'i events, my inner experience was that i felt more welcome by the shias.(resident alim Molauna Syed Abbas Aleya has very good english and gives his sermons in english and has no problem talking with non-muslims; we have a nice community in seattle; we have politics, but who doesn't?)

also, whenever i asked the sunnis about the shias, they lied to me and took on this patronizing attitude about wanting to protect me from their (shia) wrong beliefs. if i wanted to be treated like an irrational non-thinker, christianity does ok with that. if one's beliefs are so true, why should he have to lie to defend those beliefs? the sunnis need to seriously analyze why they make up so many lies about the shia beliefs.

finally muharram came along at just the right time. after hearing about Imam Hussain (as) and the Human and Divine Justice i was permanently drawn into Islam. in the West we have machiavelli, but i never agreed with the 'ends justifying the means' as to my intuitive logic the 'means determine the end.' i knew that long before i was shia, so once i heard the genuine Islamic concept of Justice, i knew i was home. the key fit the door. i converted a few days after Ashura. May 18, 1998.

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As a revert I can tell you I faced many problems when I first tried to attend the masjid near my house. It allows any muslims to come but while the sunni were involving and nice the few shia there refused to even so much as say salaam to me and basically ignored me.

The treatment I received there starting off almost turned me off islam completely (I am still trying to get back on path to be learning as I should) especially when they were combined with some of the things in my life I need to correct. If shia want more reverts they need but be more open to them when they come looking in person for help in learning and understanding.

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Salam,

As a revert and a Shia I can empathasize with (although I have not personally experienced it often) the "unwelcome" feeling that many of those new to Islam feel when they first try and socialize or worship with other non-revert Shia. I think the main cause of this is the organizational structure of most Shia masjids in the U.S.

Unlike the Salafi/Wahabbi masjids in the U.S., most Shia masjids are locally funded and organized. Generally speaking, these organizations grow "organically" in the communities in which they reside. They generally come about when a group of local immigrants get together to organize something (usually very small at first) to help educate their children about Islam and celebrate Ramandan, Eid's, Ashura, etc.

As a result of this structure, the members of these masjids are usually "locals" who all know eachother and usually are predominatly one nationality (and somethings the majority are even immigrats who come from the same village in their native land). This structure creates a natural "barrier" to outsiders, who are not known (and sometimes not even welcome) to the "locals" who have generally been active in the same masjid (or organization) for years and sometimes for generations. Also, the services are generally held in the native language (usually Arabic, but often Farsi, Urdu, etc.), which is not understandable to most Americans.

As the Shia population in the U.S. (and other Western countries) changes from one of predominatently immigrants (who came in the 70's and 80's) to one of predominately native born this structure will inevitably change.

Salam,

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the same situation in my country... i can strongly say that i am the only one who decided to be shia in my country... in my city there is one mosque, actually in all my country there is just 3 :( and all 3 are sunni mosques, and if u enter there they will not let u go out untill u dont become a sunni, i swear.... now i am just trying to escape from those people, but even in street these womens who converted to sunni Islam are coming to me and saying : ''salam sister, come with us, u must follow the right religion and dont be kufir.... Elhamdullillah i have my husband with me and soon i will go away from this country inshallah

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Most notably today the most European or American non-Muslims converts are not Shiite, rather they are ‘Sunni-Salafi’ One of the most important reasons, is the role of Dawah missionaries which are Govt. (Saudi) Funded. There are many reverts to Shiite though, however does it make a sense that first a non-Muslim has to convert to Sunni then revert to Shiite.

Also Don’t we need to make it easier and simpler to understand the ideology of Shiite to Western Non-Muslims. And also dont we lack the resources to do so.

I am sure they have researched every aspect of Islaam. Maybe for them sunnism makes more sense? Not all reverts are sunni, I have met some that are shiaa. And I even knew a revert who was sunni and then became shia, sadly she passed away last year. I think we should be happy that they are at least Muslims now and saved from Allah aza wa jaal's punishment rather than picking at if they are sunni or shia.

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(salam) (bismillah)

I was thinking about this early on today before I was even on Shiachat to see this post.

The reason is that when you embrace Islam the one group that will embrace you are the sunni/salafi people. They will pay for your hajj and even send you to madina for nothing!

I have been Shi'i for years and from what I have faced its not so nice. Go into a shia center, if you are a revert you will feel unwanted and disrespected. There are a couple nice people at these centers but for the most part its nothing to brag about...

I have honestly been getting sick of this! At one time i stuck to my Shi'i beliefs but on the outside I acted like I was sunni. I still am a Shi'i but I have become jaded over the years at the shia community. Last night I made maghib sallah at a masjid here in brooklyn that was sunni and I was welcomed.

I will never leave Shia. My belief in Ahlul Bayt has only grown stronger over the years. I would never leave this school of thought but I am tired of the way these communities have treated me.

If I was a weak person I would just go with the majority but I can not believe in anything that does not come from Ahlul Bayt.

People are not going into our school of thought due to the [Edited Out] (people) we have in our centers at large.

- a revert

(salam) (bismillah)

I was thinking about this early on today before I was even on Shiachat to see this post.

The reason is that when you embrace Islam the one group that will embrace you are the sunni/salafi people. They will pay for your hajj and even send you to madina for nothing!

I have been Shi'i for years and from what I have faced its not so nice. Go into a shia center, if you are a revert you will feel unwanted and disrespected. There are a couple nice people at these centers but for the most part its nothing to brag about...

I have honestly been getting sick of this! At one time i stuck to my Shi'i beliefs but on the outside I acted like I was sunni. I still am a Shi'i but I have become jaded over the years at the shia community. Last night I made maghib sallah at a masjid here in brooklyn that was sunni and I was welcomed.

I will never leave Shia. My belief in Ahlul Bayt has only grown stronger over the years. I would never leave this school of thought but I am tired of the way these communities have treated me.

If I was a weak person I would just go with the majority but I can not believe in anything that does not come from Ahlul Bayt.

People are not going into our school of thought due to the [Edited Out] (people) we have in our centers at large.

- a revert

OH YEAH! that felt so good to just vent about what i have been feeling.. Alhamdulillah for Shiachat :-D

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Assalamu alaikum,

I'm a revert who converted to Islam into a Sunni community about six years ago; Sunni Islam was all I was exposed to.

I can say that, in my experience and in talking to other American reverts, that IF we know we have a choice, it's harder to find basic information online (not to mention in person) about the Shi'a community. It took me months to figure out what the differences actually were.

Also, many of us are attracted to Islam because it's presented as very simple: one God, five pillars. Throw in belief in angels, the revealed text, prophets, Judgment day (which many of us were already exposed to if not believed in as Christians) and that's the entirety of what one needs to know. (Later we realize there's so much more, but that's another matter.) Shi'a Islam does not appear simple. Not only does it encompass the above, then there's the matter of the Imams, and hereditary gifted knowledge, both of which are difficult for many to accept, without a lot of study and prayer.

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Salaam Alaikum Brothers and Sisters,

I am new here but I found this conversation very interesting. I would like to contribute as a new member. I was introduced to Shia first. It is the only Islam I studied before I have chosen to commit myself to the faith. I was working at a bank and I guess I had shown I was conflicted in my faith and a Sister who happened to be Shia told me to go visit an aalim at the local masjid. He was very patient. He answered questions. He introduced me to brothers. He did not impose himself on me. There is no compulsion in religion and he planted the seed in me that has grown until this day. Siratl mustaqim...those words never left my lips.

It was the original sister's act of good will and it was a brother's understanding that brought me here to you after all these years. It has taken some time, but I am here making my shahadah. Professing my faith.

It is simple. Be open! Listen! Embrace the opportunity to talk about your faith because undoubtedly an opportunity will arise in EVERYONE'S life to bring someone closer to Allah (swt).

Also, (this an aside), more books need to be translated to English. More PDF files. More software. The Shia word needs to be spread. And I think this is very important...follow thru...if someone expresses an interest, give them your email. If you are comfortable, give them your phone #, an IM address. Be a resource and be an emissary of your faith

It would mean so much to the person who is searching if you were made available...

Ma'salaam,

Stefan

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Salam Alekum, Br.

Alhamduillah(All Praise is due to Allah), for your decision.

Here are some resources in English that I have come across, in case you don't know about these already.

First, www.al-islam.org. This has lots of good books and lectures translated into English. This is the resource I use most often(like 20x per day)

The only problem with this site is that the search doesn't work too well. I can suggest a good reading list if you are interested.

This site, shiachat, is good for interacting with other muslims, but be careful about the information that is posted by other members.

There are lots here that present themselves as learned, but really have no clue what they are talking about. Just a note of caution.

If you have a question or issue, always refer back to the most knowledgeable br or sis that you know and trust, and also to original sources,

such as Quran and Hadith, authentic hadith.

Welcome to ShiaChat and good luck. Salams,

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