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In the Name of God بسم الله
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muhammad_follower

Imaam Khomeini's Successor

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Is this true? From WIkipedia, so i dont trust it fully.

Grand Ayatollah Hossein Montazeri, a major figure of the Revolution, was designated by Khomeini to be his successor as Supreme Leader. The principle of velayat-e faqih and the Islamic constitution called for the Supreme Ruler to be a marja or grand ayatollah, and of the dozen or so grand ayatollahs living in 1981 only Montazeri accepted the concept of rule by Islamic jurist.[27] In 1989 Montazeri began to call for liberalization, freedom for political parties. Following the execution of thousands of political prisoners by the Islamic government, Montazeri told Khomeini `your prisons are far worse than those of the Shah and his SAVAK.`[83] After a letter of his complaints was leaked to Europe and broadcast on the BBC a furious Khomeini ousted him from his position as official successor. Some have said that the amendment made to Iran's constitution removing the requirement that the Supreme Leader to be a Marja, was to deal with the problem of a lack of any remaining Grand Ayatollahs willing to accept "velayat-e faqih"[84][85][86]. However, others say the reason marjas were not elected was because of their lack of votes in the Assembly of Experts, for example Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Reza Golpaygani had the backing of only 13 members of the assembly. Furthermore, there were other marjas present who accepted "velayat-e faqih"[87][88][89] Grand Ayatollah Hossein Montazeri continued his criticism of the regime and in 1997 was put under house arrest for questioning the unaccountable rule exercised by the supreme leader.[90][91][92]

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Is this true? From WIkipedia, so i dont trust it fully.

You can go and feed in anything into any entry in Wikipedia. Its a joke, note a work of reference.

There was a time when Mir Husein Ali Montazeri had been named successor to the Syed, but the Syed rescinded it over difference about how to deal with opponents.

The lady above has given you a good link.

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(salam)

Mehdi Hashemi, son-in-law of Sheikh Husein Ali Montazeri, was convicted of plotting to murder Imam Khomeini (ra) and overthrowing the Islamic government in collusion with "Mujahedin-e-Khalq (who are now very openly acting at the behest of Neo-Cons). He was hanged in 1987. Sheikh Montazeri, rather than supporting the Imam (ra) and the Revolution, preferred to support Mehdi Hashemi.

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Grand Ayatollah Montazeri was the heir apparent and spoke out against the executions of critics of the regime, and gave up the reins of power. His a brave and honourable man:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/2699541.stm

son-in-law of Sheikh Husein Ali Montazeri, was convicted of plotting to murder Imam Khomeini in collusion with "Mujahedin-e-Khalq

Wait, so it’s guilt by association? And of course Iran has an exemplary justice system?

In 2004, 22 years old Ateefah Sahaaleh was hung in public from a crane for "crimes against chastity". And was accused of adultery. She was not married and she was just 16, worse she was mentally ill. She had in fact been sexually abused by a married who received a tap of the wrist by the “Judge” and let off.

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Grand Ayatollah Montazeri was the heir apparent and spoke out against the executions of critics of the regime, and gave up the reins of power. His a brave and honourable man:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/2699541.stm

That is not what the link you have provided states. 'for criticising human rights abuses by the regime.'

is that the same as what you have stated?

Wait, so it’s guilt by association? And of course Iran has an exemplary justice system?

In 2004, 22 years old Ateefah Sahaaleh was hung in public from a crane for "crimes against chastity". And was accused of adultery. She was not married and she was just 16, worse she was mentally ill. She had in fact been sexually abused by a married who received a tap of the wrist by the “Judge” and let off.

Maybe you should research further what happened to the case you have stated above before crying injustice.

Lastly it was not guilt by association rather it was proven that he had a hand in the murder of Shaheed Beshti and other members of the revolution. Ayatollah Montazerai protected and defended him even after the evidence was convicted him.

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Salaam Brother,

That is not what the link you have provided states. 'for criticising human rights abuses by the regime. 'is that the same as what you have stated?..."spoke out against the executions of critics of the regime"

I believe that executing critics falls under the jurisdiction of "human rights". The revolution like all revolutions was particularly bloody when it began.

Maybe you should research further what happened to the case you have stated above before crying injustice.

I have seen and read interviews with her family and human rights groups working in Iran. It is a very well documented case and one that happens far to often.

it was not guilt by association

I agree. As long as you're not claiming Grand Ayatollah Montazeri is guilty of conspiracy to murder, because a relative may have been.

Edited by Jawanmardan

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Salaam Brother,

I believe that executing critics falls under the jurisdiction of "human rights". The revolution like all revolutions was particularly bloody when it began.

Wsalaams,

My point was related to where it says execution of critics. Yes I do agree that human rights abuse had taken place but no where in the article it is found that execution of critics had taken place. Human rights is a very vast field. The revolution when it began was blood stained, 15th Kordad is an example of that.

I have seen and read interviews with her family and human rights groups working in Iran. It is a very well documented case and one that happens far to often.

I agree it is a very well documented case but from what I recall reading this case was opened again recently and reviewed.

I agree. As long as you're not claiming Grand Ayatollah Montazeri is guilty of conspiracy to murder, because a relative may have been.

I never claimed that.

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Salaam,

I believe his departure from the regime began to formulate after the mass executions, Let us agree that he speaks as a critic of human rights, which at least for me is reassuring that there is someone of his stature speaking out.

it is a very well documented case but from what I recall reading this case was opened again recently and reviewed.

Brother it’s an appalling case. That a mentally ill 16 year old victim of sexual abuse should end up being executed by the very people who should have been protecting her. Watching the documentary was heart wrenching. I’m pleased if there is a review taking place, but why has it taken so long, and so many protests to get to this stage.

That it should have even occurred demonstrates how vacant Iranian justice is.

I never claimed that.

Then I don’t see the direct relevance of he being brought up in this discussion. And I am certainly not convinced by his conviction if the case I brought up demonstrates.

Warmest regards brother.

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Brother it’s an appalling case. That a mentally ill 16 year old victim of sexual abuse should end up being executed by the very people who should have been protecting her. Watching the documentary was heart wrenching. I’m pleased if there is a review taking place, but why has it taken so long, and so many protests to get to this stage.

That it should have even occurred demonstrates how vacant Iranian justice is.

The Iranian Justice system needs a revamp I agree on that but no matter how much revamp and reformation takes place there will always be individuals who will abuse the system for their personal pleasure and position.

The Iranian Justice system is changing but at a very slow rate. From what I recall in the last 4-5 years I have been there and spent considerable time there is that slowly the Government is waking up to their mistakes. The question is is it too little too late for them.

Then I don’t see the direct relevance of he being brought up in this discussion. And I am certainly not convinced by his conviction if the case I brought up demonstrates.

Did he not commit obstruction of justice by preventing his son in law from being arrested and tried? Knowing very well that the evidence linking his son in law to the murders and activities by MKO was more than sufficient.

Warmest regards brother.

Likewise! :)

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