Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

Sipah-e-mohammed Pakistan

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

  • Advanced Member

Sipah-e-Mohammed Pakistan (SMP) literally meaning ?Army of Muhammad? refers to a Shia group which is involved in sectarian terrorist activity primarily in Pakistani Punjab. The SMP is one of the two sectarian terrorist outfits proscribed on August 14, 2001, by President Pervez Musharraf.

Formation

The exact date of formation of the SMP is not certain. But it is generally believed that Maulana Mureed Abbas Yazdani created the outfit in 1993 after he was convinced that the predominant Shia organisation, Tehreek-e-Jaferia Pakistan (TJP) would not allow its young cadre to physically counter the Sunni militancy of the Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) and the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ). The Shia youth had been urging the TJP leadership to take notice of the alleged excesses of the SSP whose members were alleged to be targeting Shia's and their beliefs.

Objective

The primary objective of the SMP is the protection of the Shiite community from Sunni fundamentalist and terrorist outfits. Its main rival is the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ). SMP chief Ghulam Raza Naqvi is also reported to have visualised the creation of a Quds force comprising both Shias and Sunnis to ?liberate? Jerusalem.

Leadership and Structure

Ghulam Raza Naqvi is the Saalar-i-Aala (chief) of SMP. A dreaded hitman, when arrested in 1996, the government had placed a reward of Rs 2 million for his alleged involvement in about 30 cases of murder and dacoity. He is now in prison. He is known for turning Thokar Niaz Beg, a village in the suburbs of Lahore, a no-go area for the police who failed in at least four attempts to break this Shia stronghold. Thokar Niaz Beg also serves as the SMP headquarters. Munawwar Abbas Alvi is a front ranking SMP leader who is also in prison.

The SMP is estimated to have a cadre base of 30000 Shia followers. This mainly comprises former members of the Tehreek Nafaz Fiqh-e-Jafariya (TNFJ) and TJP. The SMP has a strong following in the Punjab province.

There are apparently no terrorist training facilities for the SMP cadres outside Pakistan and neither are its cadres been allowed to operate from outside Pakistan.

Linkages

The outfit reportedly maintains close links with the Shia regime in Iran.

Major Incidents

The SMP is involved in a number of massacres, targeted killings and dacoities. However, the phase following the October 1999 military coup in Pakistan saw a decline in sectarian violence. In February 2001, at a meeting of the Milli Yekjehti Council (MYC*), the SMP and the SSP announced their willingness to shun all differences and to withdraw cases against each other. Meanwhile, several Shia organisations have been petitioning the government for the release of SMP chief Ghulam Raza Naqvi, though the government is yet to respond. The TJP President Allama Syed Sajid Naqvi commenting in the context of the August 14, 2001 order proscribing SMP and Sunni terrorist outfit LeJ, said that there should be uniform policy vis-?is the release of cadres. He opined that as the SSP Chief Azam Tariq has been released despite his alleged involvement in many sectarian related crimes, the Federal government should release the SMP chief also.

The SMP, in February 2001, was reported to have sought membership in the Grand Democratic Alliance, formed to launch a movement for restoration of democracy in Pakistan. Even as these apparent gestures towards peace are made, the SMP was suspected to be involved in the attack on an SSP controlled mosque in which nine worshippers were killed and 12 others injured on March 12, 2001.

The SMP?s connection with the Shia regime in Iran led to the assassination of Iran?s Counsel General in Lahore, Sadeq Ganji, in December 1990 by suspected Sunni terrorists. The assassination was apparently a reprisal for the murder in February that year of SSP founder, Maulana Haq Nawaz Jhangvi. Similarly, soon after a bomb explosion at a Lahore court in January 1997 in which the then SSP chief, Zia-ur-Rehman Farooqi was killed along with 29 others, an Iranian diplomat Muhammad Ali Rahimi was killed in Multan in the same month. The Iranian Cultural Centre in Lahore too was attacked and burnt down in that month. Besides, five personnel of the Iranian armed forces who were in Pakistan for training were murdered in September 1997. An SSP activist Sheikh Haq Nawaz Jhangvi, was convicted and hanged on March 1, 2001 for the Iranian diplomat, Sadeq Ganji?s assassination.

In 1996, a faction of the SMP cadres opposed their chief Maulana Yazdani for his conciliatory attitude towards the MYC, which to them amounted to a compromise on their faith and fundamental beliefs. The present Saalar-i-Aala ('commander') of the SMP Ghulam Raza Naqvi reportedly ordered the assassination of Maulana Yazdani, which was executed in September 1996. Another faction was formed under the leadership of Major (Retd.) Ashraf Ali Shah in 1996 and confronted Ghulam Naqvi?s group which led to internecine clashes.

Ghulam Naqvi, had, in 1996, ensured that the outfit had its headquarters, Thokar Niaz Beg, a village in Lahore, completely under their control and impossible for security agencies to penetrate. Following the factional clashes, the SMP commander was forced to flee and was later arrested by police in December 1996. The year also saw the broadening target base of sectarian terrorists with several bureaucrats being attacked and killed including the Commissioner of Sargodha and the Deputy Commissioner of Khanewal.

SMP for all practical purposes stopped operating in 1996 after Ghulam Raza's arrest. Its cadres now reportedly operate on their own. Lack of financial resources and training are also key factors in the SMP?s relative oblivion. Though pro-violence Shia activists supported the Sipah-e-Muhammad, it could not get any organisational support from the TJP, which restricted itself to providing legal aid to arrested SMP cadres.

Law-enforcing agencies launched a massive crackdown on the outfit on August 15, 2001. But they could not ascertain the hideouts of the top leadership of the SMP. Approximately 200 leaders and activists of the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) and Sipah-e-Muhammad Pakistan (SMP) were arrested in a crackdown launched by the police on August 15. Punjab Police, on August 16, registered cases under the amended Anti-Terrorism Act (ATA) against the arrested activists of SMP. Arrests were also reported from various parts of Faisalabad, Jhang and Toba Tek Singh districts.

The State Bank of Pakistan (SBP), through a circular issued on August 23, 2001 ordered all banks and financial institutions to freeze the accounts of SMP with immediate effect. However, since the outfit was operating underground, official sources indicated that they might not be operating their bank accounts under the outfit?s name. Pakistani news reports have indicated that the SBP is yet to locate details of bank accounts of proscribed sectarian outfits, the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) and the Sipah-e-Muhammad Pakistan (SMP). News sources observed that SBP has confirmed reports that the banned outfits were not maintaining accounts with any of the banks or financial institutions anywhere in the country.

* The Milli Yekjehti Council (MYC) was formed in March 1995 by 11 religious/sectarian outfits to foster sectarian harmony, point out causes of any misunderstanding between sects and resolve any conflicts which result from these differences. The Council agreed in May 1995 on a 17-point code of conduct. As a result, the situation vis-a-vis sectarian violence significantly improved in 1995 and 1996. However, the extremists in both the Shia and Sunni camps blamed their leaders for compromising on their respective basic beliefs and principles and, therefore, were not happy. After a lot of grumbling, they lost patience by the middle of 1996 and started another extremely violent phase of violence. Ever since, though the MYC has been around and periodically asserts that it has successfully deflated tensions between extremist outfits, violence continues.

Taken from

http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pa...outfits/SMP.htm

Edited by UndercoverBrother
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
interesting

i got like more the half way thruy

tooooooooooooooooo looooooooooooooooooong tooo read...

But it sure was intrersting. Had heard so much about this organization but since 1997-8 it vanished in thin air. Used to think what happened and now with this extensive article about it come to know why. Like eeverything else in Pakistan it too faced internal rift problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
interesting

i got like more the half way thruy

tooooooooooooooooo looooooooooooooooooong tooo read...

Best thing to do is skim and scan the main points and headings of the article, but it was very interesting thats why I posted it.

But it sure was intrersting. Had heard so much about this organization but since 1997-8 it vanished in thin air. Used to think what happened and now with this extensive article about it come to know why. Like eeverything else in Pakistan it too faced internal rift problems.

I think Busharraf had more to do with groups like this dissapearing, not all were good but the ones who were sincere probably never got coverage or media attention instead we where told Mujahids in Pakistan were sipah-e-sahaba and deobandi movements like that. I wonder why they were so well known and given so much media attention.

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.newsline.com.pk/newsOct2003/stopoct1.htm

This makes interesting reading too

The story of sectarianism in Pakistan is as bloody as the fate of the leaders of the SSP. In 1985, the then military dictator, General Zia-ul-Haq, extended his support to the formation of a Sunni militant group in the small town of Jhang, associated with the romantic folk tale of Heer Ranjha. Twenty-nine leaders formed the group called the Anjuman Sipah-e- Sahaba (ASS), and Haq Nawaz Jhangvi, a former leader of the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam (JUI) became its founding chief. (The party subsequently changed its name to the Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan).

Zia-ul-Haq wanted to counter the increasing strength of Shia groups motivated by Imam Khomeini's Islamic revolution, who were agitating against his Islamist regime for its controversial Islamic laws, aimed at marginalising minority groups like the Shias.

The Sipah-e-Sahaba or the Army of Prophet Mohammad's companions, was a radical party from the start. It demanded that Pakistan be officially declared a Sunni Muslim state, as Iran is a Shia state.

Within no time, the group expanded its power base. It established around 500 offices across Pakistan, scores of madrassas, and its cadres grew to 100,000 hardcore militants. The party drew its support mainly from Sargodha, Jhang, Bahawalpur, Multan and Muzaffargarh in the central and southern Punjab and Karachi in Sindh.

The party also reportedly managed to set up 17 clandestine branches abroad, located in the UAE, England and Canada. Sources disclose these have remained a major source of party funding, apart from donations from Saudi Arabia.

As the party grew, so too did its activities. Groups of hit men were formed called "killers of infidels," who went about murdering scores of doctors, officials, diplomats and ordinary folk who had just their Shia identities in common.

In 1990, Iranian consul general, Sadeq Ganji, was killed, and in January 1997 the Iranian Cultural Centre in Lahore was attacked and set on fire. Seven people, including an Iranian diplomat, were killed and the incident sparked off a serious diplomatic row between Islamabad and Tehran. The targeting of Iranians was apparently meant to convey the message to Shia militants that not even their "patrons" were safe.

In the mid '90s, when Punjab and Karachi were bleeding after the worst wave of sectarian clashes and tit-for-tat targeted killings, the authorities, for the first time, recognised that the sectarian groups were getting out of hand and attempted to crack down on them.

By then, the SSP had made inroads into the hardline Islamic militia of the Taliban, which introduced a strict Sunni Islamic system in Afghanistan.

"The Taliban were and still are natural allies of Pakistan's Sunni militants as they are against Iran and brutally targeted the Shia Hazaras in Afghanistan. For them, it was a natural ideological bonding on the basis of anti-Shia rivalry," says a security official, familiar with the working and hierarchy of sectarian groups. "Friendship with the Taliban and entering Afghanistan has opened the doors for Sipah-e-Sahaba militants to international terrorist outfits," he maintains.

In the wake of the government crackdown in the mid-'90s, the SSP split into two. The dangerous and deadly Lashkar-e-Jhangvi made its appearance with the stated agenda of targeting Shias. It was led by Riaz Basra, who faulted the main party for having strayed from its core ideology. At the same time, hordes of Sunni militants from both groups went to Afghanistan for training in a camp in Sirobi, near Kabul, run by the Taliban minister, Maulvi Hameedullah, where these young men were trained in carrying out suicide missions and making explosives.

Shia militancy grew in response to the rise of Sunni extremism. In the 1980s, the Tehrik-e-Nifaz-e-Fiqh Jaffria (TNFJ) was formed with an aim to implement a Shia Islamic system similar to that of the Khomeini-led Islamic regime in Iran. The party later changed its name to the Tehrik-e-Jaffria Pakistan (TJP).

The militancy in Shia ranks took a new turn in 1993, when Mureed Abbas Yazdani created the Sipah-e-Mohammad Pakistan (SMP), convinced that the TJP would not allow its young cadres to physically attack the Sunni militants of the SSP. The SMP attracted thousands of enraged TJP party workers and members of the Imamia Students Organisation. According to an intelligence estimate, the strength of the group grew to 30,000, with the village of Thokar Niaz Beg on the outskirts of Lahore as its headquarters.

Differences eventually created another faction which led to internecine clashes, and now SMP cadres operate on their own. Many are disgruntled and left the party after a scandal erupted, concerning Tehrik chief, Allama Sajid Naqvi's marriage to a teenager.

Difficult times for the sectarian groups started in earnest when Islamabad sided with the US in its war on terror and on January 12, 2002, General Pervez Musharraf announced a new policy that banned both Shia and Sunni extremist groups. Hundreds of sectarian militants were subsequently rounded up.

In ensuing operations against them, at least 26 notorious Sunni militants were either arrested or killed. The founder of the Lashkar, Riaz Basra, the country's most wanted sectarian terrorist, was killed along with three of his accomplices during an alleged shootout with law enforcers on May 14, 2002, in Mailsi in the Punjab.

Asif Ramzi, another Lashkar-e-Jhangvi militant leader and a proclaimed offender wanted in 87 cases, was killed on December 19, 2002, in an explosion at a chemical warehouse in Karachi. He was known as a key link between local Muslim militants and the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and was also a member of a local militant team which is believed to have had links with the kidnappers of the US journalist, Daniel Pearl, who was later brutally murdered by suspected Al Qaeda operatives.

Akram Lahori is accused of numerous cases of sectarian killings and is now in prison. On May 29, 2003, his successor, Qari Abdul Hayee, was arrested during a raid in Muzaffargarh.

Despite the arrest of Sunni militants, police officials estimate that hundreds of trained sectarian militants still operate in the country. Now Sunni militants have joined hands with Kashmiri extremist groups like the Jaish-e-Mohammad and Harkatul Mujahideen and their splinter groups are known to operate with Al Qaeda and Taliban operatives in Pakistan, after the ouster of the Taliban from Afghanistan

"They can handle weapons, rockets, bombs. But the fearsome aspect is that they are not afraid of death. For them, killing Shias is a gateway to paradise," says a police investigator in Karachi, who has himself been threatened and had attempts made on his life.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
^

A* for attentiondeficit? :P

yeh hw did u know?!?!?!!? :huh:

wen i used to get my exam results the world used to into shock - alhumdollillah i did very well academically - they used to go into MAJOR shock -cos ive got the lowest attention span on the planet! and i used to say 'well my receptors are always on - even tho im in a world off my own'

LOL leave her alone^

awwwwwwwwwwwwww buddddddy

u iz my true friend :cry:

Link to post
Share on other sites
yeh hw did u know?!?!?!!? :huh:

wen i used to get my exam results the world used to into shock - alhumdollillah i did very well academically - they used to go into MAJOR shock -cos ive got the lowest attention span on the planet! and i used to say 'well my receptors are always on - even tho im in a world off my own'

Don't you know I know that

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Advanced Member
Sipah-e-Mohammed Pakistan (SMP) literally meaning ?Army of Muhammad? refers to a Shia group which is involved in sectarian terrorist activity primarily in Pakistani Punjab. The SMP is one of the two sectarian terrorist outfits proscribed on August 14, 2001, by President Pervez Musharraf.

Objective

The primary objective of the SMP is the protection of the Shiite community from Sunni fundamentalist and terrorist outfits. Its main rival is the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ). SMP chief Ghulam Raza Naqvi is also reported to have visualised the creation of a Quds force comprising both Shias and Sunnis to ?liberate? Jerusalem.

http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pa...outfits/SMP.htm

If this is their real objective and they wont bother terroizing innocent civilians then this is not only good, but needed

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 years later...
  • Advanced Member

Sipah-e-Muhammad Pakistan is a Shia group formed in the early 1990s (the exact date of formation is unclear) as a response to sectarian violence against Pakistani Shia orchestrated by Wahabi Militant Deobandi movements such as Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (S.S.P) and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (L-e-J). On August 14, 2001, it was banned by President Pervez Musharraf as a terrorist organisation.

 

During the 1980s, Zia-ul-Haq allowed and encouraged the Militant Wahabi Islamization of Pakistan. One of the organizations that arose in this period was the Sipah-e-Sahaba, a Wahabi Deobandi-supremacist militant group that considered the Shiite minority to be non-Muslim. The Wahabi Militia Sipah-e-Sahaba targeted Shiite mosques, community leaders, as well as Iranian visitors and diplomats They orchestrated the assassination of Iranian diplomat Sadiq Ganji in Lahore. They were also involved in the killing of Iranian Air Force cadets visiting Pakistan in the early 1990s, when sectarian attacks on Shiites in Pakistan were at their peak. Both acts occurred in the northern city of Rawalpindi and greatly disturbed contemporary Pakistan-Iran relations.

In response to this, Maulana Mureed Abbas Yazdani is believed to have formed Sipah-e-Muhammad as a splinter of the larger and more mainstream, Shiite political organization, Tehreek-e-Jaferia Pakistan (Movement of Shiites, Pakistan), since that organization was not encouraging a violent response to the Sipah-e-Sahaba's attacks

 

Sipah-e-Muhammad's primarily aim was to target the leaders of Wahabi Militia Sipah-e-Sahaba and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. However, with the subsequent rise in violence against Shiites, it was thought to be reforming.

The movement was strong in various Shiite communities in Pakistan, and in the majority Shiite town of Thokar Niaz Baig ran a "virtual state within a state" in the 1990s.

 

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sipah-e-Muhammad_Pakistan

 

If there is anything else people would want to add then please do because little is known about Sipah-E-Muhammed.

Edited by syeduddin
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Veteran Member
On 9/18/2013 at 7:01 AM, syeduddin said:

Sipah-e-Muhammad Pakistan is (was) a (tiny) Shia group (comprised of 14 members) formed in the early 1990s (the exact date of formation is unclear) as a response to sectarian violence against Pakistani Shia orchestrated by Wahabi Militant Deobandi movements such as Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (S.S.P) and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (L-e-J). On August 14, 2001, (after finally being able to kill their biggest enemy, the insane leader of deobundi terrorists, Azam Tariq who was also a member of national assembly where he presented a bill for the state to reconsider Shias as a non-Muslim minority), it was banned by President Pervez Musharraf as a terrorist organisation (and the small gang had to hide in basements and ultimately escaped the country and fled to places like Iran or even Greece with the help of their close relatives and friends).

 

During the 1980s, Zia-ul-Haq allowed and encouraged the Militant Wahabi Islamization of Pakistan (in a very big way with billions of dollars from Sauds and its still allowed since their target of having a Wahabi madrassa (religious school) at every 5 mile radius still isn't complete). One of the organizations that arose in this period was the Sipah-e-Sahaba, a Wahabi Deobandi-supremacist militant group that considered the Shiite minority to be non-Muslim (and they were and still are fully backed by ISI the military intelligence agency of Pakistan through the Afghan jihad and even now). The Wahabi Militia Sipah-e-Sahaba targeted Shiite mosques, community leaders, (ordinary Shia civilians,) as well as Iranian visitors and diplomats. They orchestrated the assassination of Iranian diplomat Sadiq Ganji in Lahore. They were also involved in the killing of Iranian Air Force cadets visiting Pakistan in the early 1990s, when sectarian attacks on Shiites in Pakistan were at their peak started gaining an alarming pace. Both acts occurred in the northern city of Rawalpindi and greatly disturbed contemporary Pakistan-Iran relations.

 

In response to this, Maulana Mureed Abbas Yazdani is believed to have formed (blessed) the Sipah-e-Muhammad (gang of 14 men from the city of Lahore) as a splinter (renegade detachment) of the large and mainstream, Shiite political organization, Tehreek-e-Jaferia Pakistan (Movement of Shiites, Pakistan), since that organization was not encouraging a violent response to the Sipah-e-Sahaba's attacks (although some of its local members from Lahore sheltered and helped the men escape after they slew that monstrous wild boar of a terrorist head known as Azam Tariq).

 

Sipah-e-Muhammad's primarily aim was to target the leaders of Wahabi Militia Sipah-e-Sahaba and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. However, with the subsequent rise in violence against Shiites, it was thought to be reforming (but in reality its not and thats understandable because only those who lose loved ones and want vengeance are able to stop caring about death in such suicide missions).

 

The movement was strong in various Shiite communities in Pakistan, and in the majority Shiite town of Thokar Niaz Baig, Lahore, ran a "virtual state within a state" in the 1990s (which spanned their entire Shia neighborhood).

 

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sipah-e-Muhammad_Pakistan

 

If there is anything else people would want to add then please do because little is known about Sipah-E-Muhammed.

 

There you go. Added and fixed for you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...