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In the Name of God بسم الله

How To Make Kubba, Kibbeh... What Ever...?

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kareema

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(salam)

I would like to know how to make kubba/kibbe? I mean something that is made of burghul dough and stuffed with some meat... maybe boiled or fried... What ever...

I have no idea what I'm looking for exactly because I never made them. BUT I HAVE HEARD OF THESE FAMOUS KUBBAS! So please tell me what are they and how to make them... :D

I tried to make some kind of dough from burghul but does it need some special type of burghul or didn't I just boil and smash it enough? ... Anyway, the result was that the food which was supposed to become kubba became "burghulitto" (compare to risotto!)... :D Does it need something to keep it together (flour, egg, potatoe or stuff like that?)

So if some kind sister could offer a recipe that works easily I would appreciate. If there's any difference I would like some Southern Iraqi type recipe.

I would like to know other Southern Iraqi recipes too.

Edited by kareema
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(bismillah)

(salam)

I'm a kind brother :P , and originally from Southern Iraq (not Basra, Kufa). We cook the

Potato and Beef Kebba ( I hope this is what your talking about).

Ingredients

  • 1 lb boiled potatoes
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups breadcrumbs
  • a lb ground beef
  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, minced
  • 1 dash salt
  • 1 dash pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Put meat, minced almonds, parsley on low fire for approximately 20 minutes. Mash potatoes and add eggs, mix well and add seasonings. Shape the potato mixture into a ball and stuff with the meat mixture. Slightly flatten to the shape similar to a patty no larger than your palm. Dip in bread crumbs and fry in hot oil on both sides until golden brown. Serve hot.
  2. Serve with Thousand Island dressing if you like or any other sauce that suits you.
  3. Keep napkin at ready to catch drool!

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I know how to make these too. My grandmother made this. Beat potatoes first and then add eggs and beat hard and they become more sticky and crumbs stick better too.

I have a fantastic recipe for this at home - it's very easy and it uses burghal (cracked wheat) as Kareema first asked.

Insha'Allah I will post it tomorrow. I could guess but I don't want to annoy people with inaccurate information. Oh, and I have had the stamp of approval from a southern Iraqi too. :D

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I have a fantastic recipe for this at home - it's very easy and it uses burghal (cracked wheat) as Kareema first asked.

Insha'Allah I will post it tomorrow. I could guess but I don't want to annoy people with inaccurate information. Oh, and I have had the stamp of approval from a southern Iraqi too. :D

(salam) Oh! Is that the same as bulghar wheat? I have heard of that and would love to try it. I will look for your recipe :)

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(salam) Oh! Is that the same as bulghar wheat? I have heard of that and would love to try it. I will look for your recipe :)

(salam)

I think it is - there is always variances on English spelling of Arabic words! Insha'Allah, tomorrow.. Insha'Allah...

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(salam)

I think it is - there is always variances on English spelling of Arabic words! Insha'Allah, tomorrow.. Insha'Allah...

(salam) That sounds really good - the wheat would have more flavour than the potato I think :) I will look tomorrow or the next day.

Edited by Maryaam
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mmm kibbeh mi2liyeh is good. and then theres kibbeh blaban (in yogurt). and kibbeh nayeh which i never tried (yes im lebanese and i never had kibbeh nayeh :!!!: , it just doesnt appeal to me) maybe ill try it next time my mom makes it lol.

oh ya if you really want to make good kibbeh ask an arab mom lol. dont waste your time with recipes, ask a real cook ;)

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As promised!

1kg finely ground beef or lamb mince

3 cups bulghar (cracked wheat)

water

2 cups flour

6 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon cummin

1 teaspoon allspice

2 medium onions, 1 finely chopped, 1 coarsley chopped (keep separate)

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

oil for frying

Shell:

In a medium bowl, soak wheat for 30 minutes in cold water (just covering the wheat). Remove and drain. Remove excess water by squeezing through thick paper towel or cheesecloth. Place into medium bowl and combine with coarsley chopped onion, flour, oil and salt.

Combine well and place in food processor until dough like consistency. If it is not moist enough, add an icecube at a time into the mixture. Place mixture aside.

Filling:

In a medium frying pan, saute the finely chopped onion in oil. Add pine nuts if using. Add ground lamp or beef and chop well with a wooden spoon or spatula to ensure the meat is seperated. Add allspice, salt and cummin. Once meat is brown, remove from heat and allow to cool for 10 minutes.

Assembling:

Take an egg sized amount of the shell mixture and form into a ball. With your finger, poke a hole im the ball, making a space for filling. Add filling and pinch the top to seal the ball. You can shape it into a point, or football shape, or leave as a ball.

Fry in 180 degree oil or in deepfryer for about 10 minutes or until golden brown. Drain on paper towels. Makes about 25.

Tip:

Can be stored in the freezer in an airtight container for up to 3 months. Prepare and do not fry.

It sounds like a lot of work, but it is mainly the amount of washing up at the end of it! My first attempt took about 30 minutes after I had soaked the wheat till I was eating them.

Enjoy!!

Edited by hijabikel
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(salam)

Thank you for the recipe! I hope I can try this as soon as possible. The incredients sound easy to find insha Allah...

I'm just wondering that does burghul become soft enough if you keep it in cold water for 30 minutes...? :unsure:

Is it possible to boil these in water instead of frying in oil?

Can I ask you to do me one more favor? I had to put these incredients in different order. It was difficult for me to follow the recipe because it wasn't in order... :squeez:

So, could you check if this is correct?

Shell:

3 cups bulghar (cracked wheat)

(water for soaking)

1 coarsley chopped onion

2 cups flour (<=wheat flour, I guess?)

6 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 teaspoons salt

Filling:

oil for frying

1 finely chopped onion

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

1kg finely ground beef or lamb mince

1 teaspoon allspice

salt

1 teaspoon cummin

Edited by kareema
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(salam) Thank you for the recipe - I will make them this weekend. Soon I will be a good cook and have many asking for my wonderful foods!! Well, maybe not yet :P

I have a little question - is the 2 teaspoons of salt for both the dough and the meat mixture and you split it between the two?

I am getting excited to try it -

Edited by Maryaam
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(salam)

I tried this yesterday but I made it only half amount. I noticed that there's way too much meat in this recipe...!? or maybe I just couldn put all that inside because I had a problem in making the shell thin enough. So the majority was burghul dough. :!!!: It's so difficult to make them thin enough without breaking them in hands because all the time it feels like breaking...

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(salam)

I tried this yesterday but I made it only half amount. I noticed that there's way too much meat in this recipe...!? or maybe I just couldn put all that inside because I had a problem in making the shell thin enough. So the majority was burghul dough. :!!!: It's so difficult to make them thin enough without breaking them in hands because all the time it feels like breaking...

Maybe put egg in the bulghar wheat mixture.... I know when using the potato for the dough you have to beat it for a bit to make it stick together and put in egg or egg white.

When using wheat product - Wheat gluten will form and bind the dough together if you beat wheat flour a bit, but I dont know about bulgahr. I am going to try it this weekend though and see...

I found this recipe "Kubba Burghul" that mixes the lamb with the burghul http://www.dangoor.com/TheScribe51.pdf and go to page 5 of 9. It is hard to make till you make many and become expericience cook.

Edited by Maryaam
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(salam)

Thank you for the recipe! I hope I can try this as soon as possible. The incredients sound easy to find insha Allah...

I'm just wondering that does burghul become soft enough if you keep it in cold water for 30 minutes...? :unsure:

Yes, the burghul both softens and fattens up in the water. It doesn't take long. You should find that all the water is absorbed by the burghul within the 30 minutes.

Is it possible to boil these in water instead of frying in oil?

Noooooooo. Unfortunately some things just need to be fried. This is one of those times.

Can I ask you to do me one more favor? I had to put these incredients in different order. It was difficult for me to follow the recipe because it wasn't in order... :squeez:

So, could you check if this is correct?

Shell:

3 cups bulghar (cracked wheat)

(water for soaking)

1 coarsley chopped onion

2 cups flour (<=wheat flour, I guess?)

6 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 teaspoons salt

Filling:

oil for frying

1 finely chopped onion

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

1kg finely ground beef or lamb mince

1 teaspoon allspice

salt

1 teaspoon cummin

Looks good to me. Sorry my ingredients weren't in much order. I just wanted to get my post up so everyone could get cookin'!

(salam) Thank you for the recipe - I will make them this weekend. Soon I will be a good cook and have many asking for my wonderful foods!! Well, maybe not yet :P

I have a little question - is the 2 teaspoons of salt for both the dough and the meat mixture and you split it between the two?

I am getting excited to try it -

I keep wondering when people will ask me to cook for them. It hasn't happened yet! :lol:

Yes, split the salt. It will make it tasty all over.

(salam)

I tried this yesterday but I made it only half amount. I noticed that there's way too much meat in this recipe...!? or maybe I just couldn put all that inside because I had a problem in making the shell thin enough. So the majority was burghul dough. :!!!: It's so difficult to make them thin enough without breaking them in hands because all the time it feels like breaking...

To make the shells nice and thin you need to make sure your hands are moistened with water. This will help hold it all together. It takes practice, but eventually you will use all the meat (in the mean time, take a piece of flat bread, add some chopped up lettuce and tomato, add a little garlic sauce, and your left over meat, roll it up and you've got lunch right there!).

Maybe put egg in the bulghar wheat mixture.... I know when using the potato for the dough you have to beat it for a bit to make it stick together and put in egg or egg white.

When using wheat product - Wheat gluten will form and bind the dough together if you beat wheat flour a bit, but I dont know about bulgahr. I am going to try it this weekend though and see...

I found this recipe "Kubba Burghul" that mixes the lamb with the burghul http://www.dangoor.com/TheScribe51.pdf and go to page 5 of 9. It is hard to make till you make many and become expericience cook.

You shouldn't need to add an egg to the bulghar mixture - it does hold itself together pretty well. It shouldn't hurt though if you're having problems.

I made the shell with mince in it the first time I make Kubba and it didn't taste particularly good. I found the time it takes for frying wasn't really enough to cook the mince properly and left it a little unappetizing! It helped hold everything together nicely though! Maybe you'll have more luck than me! :wacko:

Trust me, it's worth persevering with - once you get the hang of it everyone will love you (well, your skill of cooking kubba at least!).

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(salam) I kept my hands wet with a bowl of water next to the batter and kept the batter mixture cold over another bowl of ice and water - i was told to do this by someone else and had not too many difficulties. I had meat mixture left over but the kubba I finished was crisp and really delicious. I just dropped it into the deep fryer and it kind of all sealed together. I like it better than with the potatoes. It tastes kind of nutty even though there are not nuts in the mixture. Thank you for all your help :)

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(salam) I kept my hands wet with a bowl of water next to the batter and kept the batter mixture cold over another bowl of ice and water - i was told to do this by someone else and had not too many difficulties. I had meat mixture left over but the kubba I finished was crisp and really delicious. I just dropped it into the deep fryer and it kind of all sealed together. I like it better than with the potatoes. It tastes kind of nutty even though there are not nuts in the mixture. Thank you for all your help :)

Fantastic to hear! I will try your suggestion next time, and put the bowl in a bowl of iced water. Sounds like great advice.

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(salam)

What kind of oil do you use for boiling/frying? How much do you need it? I know it doesn't cost much to buy some special oil just for boiling stuff like these but if there's going to be much of it... I don't like to waste food and it feels like wasting if I should spend much oil only for boiling these things...

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(salam)

What kind of oil do you use for boiling/frying? How much do you need it? I know it doesn't cost much to buy some special oil just for boiling stuff like these but if there's going to be much of it... I don't like to waste food and it feels like wasting if I should spend much oil only for boiling these things...

(salam) I used safflower oil - you can strain it after and put in a large jar in the fridge - I am going to make vegetable tempura this weekend and will use it again. I dont know if others do this - but my grandma used to do this. But once you use it for fish you have to discard it.

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(salam) I used safflower oil - you can strain it after and put in a large jar in the fridge - I am going to make vegetable tempura this weekend and will use it again. I dont know if others do this - but my grandma used to do this. But once you use it for fish you have to discard it.

(salam)

My grandma used to save deep-fry oil too, and reuse it for up to three or four dishes. With her, too, once she used the oil to fry fish, or if the food fried in it accidently burned, she would discard the oil (or heat it and pour it on weeds in the back yard instead of pesticides).

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Salaam.

Kubbah Burghul... Burghul wheat and minced meat balls - a classic! And delicious!!!

Here is a tip I hope it will help... once you have made and shaped the Kubbah then place it in the freezer till hardenend then when you need it just take out and fry; this will prevent the burghul wheat from breaking apart.

As for the oil... anything but vegetable oil as the smell is unpleaant, also if you see the condition of the old veggies used for making the oil it will put you off even fresh veg for life! Corn oil is ok but I somehow find it sticky. For frying sunflower oil works best for me.

As for Kubbah Naya... Raw meat balls - or any raw meat dishes well known in Lebanon - the idea makes me want to be sick!!! Even Homosapiens (I think is what the early man was called) ate meat that was cooked over open fires otherwise made do with fruit, veg and seeds. Also I do not wish to get BSE or Salmonella! My Labanese friend ate a raw meat salad when she was invited as a guest to a Lebanese family home in Ramadan - the same night she was in ICU with acute food poisoning and was very unwell... lucky to be alive now.

Edited by Mahdiyah
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(salam)

What do you eat kubbah with?

(salam) I dip in a cool dip of yogurt, grated cucumber, mint and garlic - I dont know what it is called - but it is easy to make.

Grate about 1/2 English cucumber, sprinkle with salt, let it drain of water and then add garlic (as much as you want - I use 2 cloves) through a garlic press and dry mint leaves about 3 ml or more if you like - mix with about 375 ml of yogurt (sour cream added makes it richer in taste) and put it in the fridge for a couple of hours.

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(salam)

What do you eat kubbah with?

Kubbah Burghul or any Kubbah is a starter dish so one normally eats it prior their main course with their meal. It can be eaten with tomato sauce or any sauce or yoghurt or as it is eaten traditionally - on its own is the best. However sometimes it is eaten with Naan bread with chips or salad as a main meal. So really it is how one prefers. I personally like it as a starter with either ketchup or yoghurt.

Edited by Mahdiyah
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