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Found 9 results

  1. Events of the A'shura after the Martyrdom of Al-Imam Al- Husayn(as) https://www.al-islam.org/lohoof-sighs-sorrow-sayyid-ibn-tawus/battle-and-its-related-events#event-4
  2. I recently started reading about Ottoman history and I found out that most of the Ottoman sultans mothers were concubines that they captured from their conquests into Europe, since Ottoman sultans can’t marry other high class Turkish women due to political reasons and they didn’t want powerful enemies to challenge the house of Osmanoğlu, so my questions are, are the Ottoman sultans whose mother was a concubine makes him a [Edited Out] ? What’s the difference between a slave and a concubine? And what is the shia view on this ?
  3. Salam, I've briefly searched Shiachat for reasonable and source-based responses to this, but haven't found any. Slavery is allowed in Islam, since Islam did not abolish it. Allamah Tabatabai writes in his tafsir Al-Mizan under verses 4:23-28: "Sexual intercourse with one's slave women is lawful without marriage." Imam Sajjad also mentions the rights of slaves in his Treatise of Rights. The Quran on numerous occasions uses the term "those whom your right hands possess", referring to slaves. So here are some of my questions: How does Islamic law define a slave? Are only prisoners of war allowed to be taken as slaves? What is an Islamically halal way of obtaining a slave? What is the rationale behind making prisoners of wars slaves? Is it to punish them? For how long will this punishment last? Will the slaves' children also be slaves? If yes, why (what wrong have these children done to be slaves)? And is it forbidden to have sex with a female slave or prisoner of war without her consent? Provide proof (sources that say it's forbidden). And can free women also have sex with their male slaves and/or prisoners of war? Please don't say it has no more relevance in the modern world. That's not the point. I want to learn about what Islam has to say on this matter. Non-Muslims often question the integrity and peaceful nature of Islam, and slavery is one of their objections. I want to be able to answer them reasonably. This is an intellectual pursuit, not a practical one (I'm not looking for slaves at the moment), and it's very important.
  4. SalamAlakum, What is Islam's stance on slavery? There are 29 verses in the Quran which refer to "those whom your right hands possess." From common sensical understanding these refer to the slaves of that time. How can we explain to a non-muslim that Islam indeed abolished slavery or reformed it? Please give references for any answers, views and also hadiths. IHH
  5. SalamAlakum, What is Islam's stance on slavery? There are 29 verses in the Quran which refer to "those whom your right hands possess." From common sensical understanding these refer to the slaves of that time. How can we explain to a non-muslim that Islam indeed abolished slavery or reformed it? Please give references for any answers, views and also hadiths. IHH
  6. https://www.quora.com/Did-Muhammad-own-sex-slaves Can someone provide me shia hadith and opinions as to why the prophet Muhammad(SAW) allowed sex slaves. Thanks
  7. (salam) How's it going everybody? Brace yourselves... What are the conditions for being a legitimate witness under Shari'ah for Nikah, transaction, and against a crime? Must there be two women in place of one man only during a transaction, or does this ruling apply to the other scenarios as well? Can a slave be a witness for Nikah or transaction or in a court against a crime? Can he testify against his master? If the scenario calls for two women in place of one man, will slave women count? If so, how many are required? When is a non-Muslim's testimony accepted? When is a non-Muslim woman's testimony accepted? When is a non-Muslim slave's testimony accepted? When is a non-Muslim slave woman's testimony accepted? Is a non-Baligh's testimony ever accepted? What about a non-Baligh girl? What about a non-Baligh slave? What about a non-Baligh slave girl? What about a non-Muslim non-Baligh? What about a non-Muslim, non-Baligh girl? What about a non-Muslim, Non-Baligh slave? What about a non-Muslim, non-Baligh slave girl? Please try to answer as many as you can through any source you find reliable. I have Taqleed of Sayed Sistani (ha), but such detailed questions are usually not found in any common books of the Maraaji'. And this one does not fit the title, but I will ask it anyway: Can an 'Aadil, Baligh, Male, Muslim Slave be a judge? Can he lead prayer? Can attain Ijtihad and be a Marja'? Please do not turn this into something it is not. Do not "hijack" the thread. Let us keep the discussion to what is being asked and to a bare minimum. Thanks ShiaChat peeps. (wasalam)
  8. Our dear old Fiskie with is withering salvo on Arabs for their rampant, and criminal, racism. ********* How many tracts, books, documentaries, speeches and doctoral theses have been written and produced about Islamophobia? How many denunciations have been made against the Sarkozys and the Le Pens and the Wilders for their anti-immigration (for which, read largely anti-Muslim) policies or – let us go down far darker paths – against the plague of Breivik-style racism? The problem with all this is that Muslim societies – or shall we whittle this down to Middle Eastern societies? – are allowed to appear squeaky-clean in the face of such trash, and innocent of any racism themselves. A health warning, therefore, to all Arab readers of this column: you may not like this week's rant from yours truly. Because I fear very much that the video of Alem Dechasa's recent torment in Beirut is all too typical of the treatment meted out to foreign domestic workers across the Arab world (there are 200,000 in Lebanon alone). Many hundreds of thousands have now seen the footage of 33-year-old Ms Dechasa being abused and humiliated and pushed into a taxi by Ali Mahfouz, the Lebanese agent who brought her to Lebanon as a domestic worker. Ms Dechasa was transported to hospital where she was placed in the psychiatric wing and where, on 14 March, she hanged herself. She was a mother of two and could not stand the thought of being deported back to her native Ethiopia. That may not have been the only reason for her mental agony. Lebanese women protested in the centre of Beirut, the UN protested, everyone protested. Ali Mahfouz has been formally accused of contributing to her death. But that's it. The Syrian revolt, the Bahraini revolution, the Arab Awakening, have simply washed Alem Dechasa's tragedy out of the news. How many readers know – for example – that not long before Ms Dechasa's death, a Bengali domestic worker was raped by a policeman guarding her at a courthouse in the south Lebanese town of Nabatieh, after she had been caught fleeing an allegedly abusive employer? As the Lebanese journalist Anne-Marie El-Hage has eloquently written, Ms Dechasa belonged to "those who submit in silence to the injustice of a Lebanese system that ignores their human rights, a system which literally closes its eyes to conditions of hiring and work often close to slavery". All too true. How well I recall the Sri Lankan girl who turned up in Commodore Street at the height of the Israeli siege and shelling of West Beirut in 1982, pleading for help and protection. Like tens of thousands of other domestic workers from the sub-continent, her passport had been taken from her the moment she began her work as a domestic "slave" in the city; and her employers had then fled abroad to safety – taking the girl's passport with them so she could not leave herself. She was rescued by a hotel proprietor when he discovered that local taxi drivers were offering her a "bed" in their vehicles in return for sex. Everyone who lives in Lebanon or Jordan or Egypt or Syria, for that matter, or – especially – the Gulf, is well aware of this outrage, albeit cloaked in a pious silence by the politicians and prelates and businessmen of these societies. In Cairo, I once remarked to the Egyptian hosts at a dinner on the awful scars on the face of the young woman serving food to us. I was ostracised for the rest of the meal and – thankfully – never invited again. Arab societies are dependent on servants. Twenty-five per cent of Lebanese families have a live-in migrant worker, according to Professor Ray Jureidini of the Lebanese American University in Beirut. They are essential not only for the social lives of their employers (housework and caring for children) but for the broader Lebanese economy. Yet in the Arab Gulf, the treatment of migrant labour – male as well as female – has long been a scandal. Men from the subcontinent often live eight to a room in slums – even in the billionaires' paradise of Kuwait – and are consistently harassed, treated as third-class citizens, and arrested on the meanest of charges. Saudi Arabia long ago fell into the habit of chopping off the heads of migrant workers who were accused of assault or murder or drug-running, after trials that bore no relation to international justice. In 1993, for example, a Christian Filipino woman accused of killing her employer and his family was dragged into a public square in Dammam and forced to kneel on the ground where her executioner pulled her scarf from her head before decapitating her with a sword. Then there was 19-year old Sithi Farouq, a Sri Lankan housemaid accused of killing her employer's four-year-old daughter in 1994. She claimed her employer's aunt had accidentally killed the girl. On 13 April, 1995, she was led from her prison cell in the United Arab Emirates to stand in a courtyard in a white abaya gown, crying uncontrollably, before a nine-man firing squad which shot her down. It was her 20th birthday. God's mercy, enshrined in the first words of the Koran, could not be extended to her, it seems, in her hour of need. Weblink
  9. (bismillah) In The Name of Allah (SWT) , The Most Beneficent, The Most Merciful. (salam) I hope you are all in the best of health and, more importantly, Imaan (faith). :D So, I had a question regarding the following verses of the Quran: [4.3] And if you fear that you cannot act equitably towards orphans, then marry such women as seem good to you, two and three and four; but if you fear that you will not do justice (between them), then (marry) only one or what your right hands possess; this is more proper, that you may not deviate from the right course. [33.50] O Prophet! surely We have made lawful to you your wives whom you have given their dowries, and those whom your right hand possesses out of those whom Allah has given to you as prisoners of war, and the daughters of your paternal uncles and the daughters of your paternal aunts, and the daughters of your maternal uncles and the daughters of your maternal aunts who fled with you; and a believing woman if she gave herself to the Prophet, if the Prophet desired to marry her-- specially for you, not for the (rest of) believers; We know what We have ordained for them concerning their wives and those whom their right hands possess in order that no blame may attach to you; and Allah is Forgiving, Merciful. [33.52] It is not allowed to you to take women afterwards, nor that you should change them for other wives, though their beauty be pleasing to you, except what your right hand possesses and Allah is Watchful over all things. [70.30] Except in the case of their wives or those whom their right hands possess-- for these surely are not to be blamed, Now, I do know that "those your right hands possess" refers to slaves. My question is: do these verses mean that a person can be intimate with his slaves without wedlock or should they also be married before any intimacy? Also, what are the rules regarding such relationships? Any help will be greatly appreciated! :D May Allah (SWT) bless us all, our families and loves ones, may He guide us all to The Straight Path with His Perfect Guidance and may He, The Forgiver of Sins and The Oft-Forgiving, forgive all our sins for, verily, there is neither any refuge nor any respite for the sinners, except in Allah (SWT) .
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