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Found 4 results

  1. Time for liberation of Eastern Saudi and time for liberating the occupied Yemeni provinces... the dogs of hell cannot and should not get away with this... Saudi Shia cleric Nimr al-Nimr 'sentenced to death' A court in Saudi Arabia has sentenced a prominent Shia cleric to death, his brother has said on Twitter. Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr went on trial in Riyadh last year after being accused by prosecutors of "sowing discord" and "undermining national unity". The cleric was a vocal supporter of the mass anti-government protests that erupted in Eastern Province in 2011. His arrest two years ago, during which he was shot and wounded by police, triggered days of deadly unrest. Oil-rich Eastern Province is home to a Shia majority that has long complained of marginalisation at the hands of the Sunni royal family. Protests began there in February 2011 after the start of the pro-democracy uprising in neighbouring Bahrain, which has a Shia majority and a Sunni royal family. The Saudi authorities deny discriminating against Shia and blame Iran for stirring up discontent. 'Crucifixion' Sheikh Nimr's brother said he had been sentenced to death by Riyadh's Specialised Criminal Court, which tries terrorism cases, on Wednesday morning. When the cleric, who holds the rank of ayatollah, went on trial in March 2013 prosecutors called for his execution by "crucifixion", a punishment which in Saudi Arabia involves beheading followed by public display of the decapitated body. Human rights groups expressed concern at the time that he would not receive a fair trial. They also said he had still not been given access to adequate medical care for the gunshot wounds he received during his arrest in July 2012, something denied by the authorities. Police shot Sheikh Nimr in the leg four times in disputed circumstances as they detained him after a car chase in Eastern Province's Qatif district. Officials said he rammed a security forces vehicle, leading to a gun battle. However, his family disputed the allegation that he resisted arrest and insisted that he did not own a weapon. The cleric was held for eight months before being charged and reportedly spent the first four in an isolation cell at a prison hospital in Riyadh. Activists and relatives say Sheikh Nimr, who has a wide following among Shia in Eastern Province and other states, supported only peaceful protests and eschewed all violent opposition to the government. In 2011, he told the BBC that he supported "the roar of the word against authorities rather than weapons... the weapon of the word is stronger than bullets, because authorities will profit from a battle of weapons". His arrest prompted days of protests in which three people were killed. BBC
  2. Yemen's Houthis Reject Government Move to Quell Protests Reuters--September 02, 2014 4:19 PM--SANA'A Yemen's president dismissed his government on Tuesday, proposed a national unity administration and suggested reinstating fuel subsidies, government sources said, in moves to quell weeks of unrest by a rebel movement. But the Houthis, a Shi'ite Muslim group that had massed tens of thousands of supporters in the capital Sana'a with camps set up near the Interior Ministry, rejected the compromise proposals by President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. The impasse raises fears of worsening instability in Yemen, an impoverished Arabian Peninsula state bordering oil exporting power Saudi Arabia, and which is also struggling with a stubborn al-Qaida insurgency and southern secessionists. The Houthis, who are demanding that the government resign and subsidies be fully restored, have been fighting for years for more power for their Zaydi sect in north Yemen. Government sources told Reuters that Hadi had dismissed his government, suggested a national unity administration and planned to reduce petrol and diesel prices by 30 percent to offset unpopular cuts to fuel subsidies, which had drained Yemeni coffers but buoyed impoverished citizens. A government source said implementation of the initiative depended on the Houthis' acceptance. Mohammed Abdulsalam, a spokesman for Houthi leader Abdulmalek al-Houthi, said in a statement on his Facebook page, “We do not agree to it. Our position is still that we [stand] by the Yemeni people who have gone out in a blessed popular revolution to demand their legitimate and just rights.” A member of the Houthis' political bureau, Abdel Malik al-Hijri, told Reuters “What was demanded was a cancelation of the fuel price rise, and the lowering which was announced today represents nothing.” With the Houthis' rejection, it is unclear what the government's next move will be. However, Hadi, in a speech before the meeting where the proposal was signed, suggested his patience was running out. “I affirm that I will deal decisively with all attempts to shake security and carry out division,” he said in remarks on the state Saba news agency. Insecurity and political turmoil have mounted in Yemen since Arab spring protests ousted veteran autocrat Ali Abdullah Saleh in 2011 and Hadi took his place in a complex deal mediated by the United Nations, Gulf neighbors and the United States. The United States and Saudi Arabia were alarmed by the rapid growth of al-Qaida in Yemen in the disorder created by the anti-Saleh uprising and are keen to avoid a spread into the majority Sunni Muslim state of sectarian bloodshed plaguing other regions of the Middle East. In a copy of Hadi's initiative seen by Reuters, the president plans a minimum wage rise and the allotment of ministerial posts to the Houthis and other constituencies while retaining the right to the weightiest portfolios of finance, foreign affairs, defense and the interior.
  3. Note: The Salafi Kufr school, Darul-Shaitan is built in a province whose 95% or more is Shia... The school is funded by Zionists lapdogs, the Saudis. In recent years they encouraged the Salafis to turn the Takfiri school into a military base so they can use it against Shias or use it if anything happens between Saudi and North Yemen. The main slogans of Darul Haidth school in Dammaj is that Shias are heretics and should be killed. ------------------------------ Two men from a mosque in West London have been killed fighting alongside Islamic fundamentalists in Yemen, it can be disclosed. The two men, one a former accountancy student, had travelled to a religious school to study Islam but took up arms in Yemen’s increasingly bloody civil war, their friends and relatives told the Daily Telegraph. They were killed fighting rival shia Muslims in the mountains around the small town of Dammaj in Northern Yemen, according to one report. The father of one of the men said he considered his son to be “shaheed” [a martyr] and his whole family had been inspired to adopt fundamentalist Islam. Both men attended a small mosque in Cranford, West London, under the flight path into Heathrow. An imam at the mosque said they did not agree with suicide bombing or terrorism but they would not discourage members of the congregation from traveling to Dammaj, which is considered a seat of learning for fundamentalist “salafi” Islam. Adil Malik, 24, from Hounslow, and his friend, Hisham, had been living in Dammaj for several years, studying with Sheikh Yahya al- Hajooree, who runs a madrassa called Dar ul-Haadith. The seminary is said to have several thousand students from all over the world, including dozens from Britain but has come under regular attack from shia Houthi tribesmen. The sheikh made a call to arms in a video posted online two months before Mailk died, declaring: “Whoever is killed defending his faith has died a martyr.” In a posting on a salafi website, a man calling himself Ibn Salaf wrote of an attack by “our noble mujahideen” [holy fighters] on the Houthis in the mountains around the town which led to an artillery response which killed 22 fighters from Dammaj. “From these brothers was our honourable brother Aadil al-Pakistani, one who was always known for having lofty manners and zeal to seek knowledge of the religion and likewise our brother Hishaam who had been studying at Dammaj for five years and benefited a great deal.” He added: “For those of you who did not know them, they were both brothers from Cranford Masjid [mosque] and very well known amongst the salafi brothers for their goodness.” Malik’s father, who moved to Britain from Pakistan 40 years ago, said Dammaj had been under siege by the Houthis for a month at the time his son died in December last year. “He didn’t go there to fight but if someone comes and attacks you, you have to defend yourself,” he said. Malik’s father said his son was “shaheed” and added: “His time was written, it is going to come for you, it is written for everyone.” He reserved his wrath for the Houthi fighters, adding: “The Lord will punish them, they will pay, they will burn in hell, that is my prayer. They have taken innocent people’s lives.” Hisham was originally from Saudi Arabia but has lived in India and in London, according to Malik’s father. Malik was born in Britain and attended Northolt High School and turned to religion while studying accountancy at Brunel University in West London. The school did not respond to requests for comment. Mohammed Nurudeen Hamani, an imam at Cranford Mosque originally from Ghana, said a number of young men from the mosque had travelled to Dammaj, including one who had recently returned. “We believe that one day or another, you will die and your next life will be different and you have to be willing to accept that.” Telegraph
  4. Houthis to Salafi Terrorists: Stop Takfir, terrorist acts, suicide bombing against civilians and religious ceremonies, or else face the consequences. ------------------------------------------------ Yemen Shiite Houthis Fight Salafist Terrorists Near Saudi Arabia’s Border Yemen’s Shiite Muslim Houthis killed 24 Salafist terrorists yesterday after a week of sporadic fighting between the two religious communities in the north of the country near the border with Saudi Arabia. The Houthis attacked the Dar Al-Hadith school in the Dammaj region in Saada, according to Abdulhamid al-Hajouri, the principal of the school. About 60 Salafists terrorists, who are considered conservative Sunnis, were wounded in the clashes, Abu Ismail, spokesman for the group in Dammaj, said in a phone interview today. Several Houthi fighters were also killed and wounded, Dhaifallah al-Shami, a leader of the Shiite group, said. Abdelmalek al-Houthi, had issued orders for a ceasefire but that the Salafis rejected it and fought on. "We have martyrs and wounded," he said. "We have informed the mediators that the Salafis can have their slogans as long as they refrain from incitement and takfir (denouncing a Muslim as an infidel)." The escalations between both groups started when Houthis claimed that Salafis are entering weapons inside their educational institutions in the town of Dammaj, and demanded that all military posts are emptied. As Salafis refused, a tightened siege against their religious school complex took place early this week. bloomberg.com Houthis rejected the power transfer signing that took place in Riyadh earlier this week and said it would not recognize it. "The movement has more than 100,000 fighters ready to obey commands from their spiritual leader, Abdul Malik al-Houthi," said Ahmed Bahri, an expert in Houthi affairs. "This movement is well organized and only has one head," Bahri said. "They now control majority areas in the provinces in Sa'ada and Jawf, and have powerful presence in Amran, Mareb, Sana'a and Hajjah," added Bahri. Sectarian violence is at peak in northern Yemen where Houthis control is spread across five provinces. Saudi Arabia fought the Houthis in 2009 but failed to end their expansion. The attacks come a day after Yemen's vice president called for presidential elections to be held in February, state media reported. CNN Recently Salafi terrorists backed by the West and Saudi Nasabis were organizing themselves to kill Shias in Northern Yemen instead of focusing on Saleh's government and the revolution of the people. Finally, Houthis are saying, enough is enough. Either live amongst Shia communities of the north in a peaceful coexistence or face the will of Allah. Houthis must hurry and expand party's influence and presence in the land and towards the sea and unite with Shia tribesmen before it is too late and again face oppression of puppets and Nawasib for another 50 years.
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