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Found 13 results

  1. hasanhh

    Want a Scare ?

    Since we do not have an "Economics Forum" any more [] and since most economics word search came up in this forum, l am putting the SCARE here. l have been doing some reading on US Retail failures after the dismal reports coming out from Macy's, Dillards, JCPenny and other department stores. Not good. You can do some quick reads for this past week in business sections. BUT, what l am wondering about is WHY ? Competition is so fierce that some store chains will fade away, yet most are suffering. And not just because the Shopping Mall Model from the 1950s has been failing since the 1980s. Nor because suddenly AMAZON is 'killing-the-competition' at half-snail-mail-pace of shipping as there were substantial catalogue sales for Sears and other companies all through the 20th Century.[Full snail-mail-pace: mail-in-order/payment, ship-back]. OPINE: It is because there is no more money in younger people's pockets. Older customers, too. Credit cards running on 'Limit', student debt, car debt, high housing costs, rising bread prices, and so on ad nauseum. There are two videos in this link. One is ~6 minutes and is about student debt, JPMorgan and ABSs. The other is ~42 minutes which some notes follow: "snowball lending" at the beginning. Real Estate Bubbles @ 11 minutes. Vacant homes in London. (DW,12Aug17 reported that Hong Kong prices went up 20% in April year-on-year ) "nothing is backed-up" 16:20 --nearly everything is computer created digits and securities-on-borrowed money. "deposit money creation" @30' [or as l call it: "push button money] ing Opine @ 36:15 use of the word "fair" should be "stable" As the film says, we have impending "wealth destruction". http://www.dw.com/en/10-years-on-what-might-cause-the-next-financial-crisis/a-40058311 In Feb2009 the assessment for the end of the Great Recession was calculated to be 10-to-12 years from then. ld est, 2019-to-2021. For another unnerving video or transcript, PBS Charlie Rose, Monday07Aug17 interview with Financial Times editor Gillian Tett who said in the course of the session that after the 2008 Financial Crisis started, she started getting calls from bankers asking her what some financial instruments are, such as ABS, MBS, swaps and so forth.
  2. Salam I'm just beginning to learn, but find the concepts inspiring. I'm sure as a civil engineer, I can contribute. I'm just not yet sure how. http://www.asce.org/issues-and-advocacy/public-policy/policy-statement-418---the-role-of-the-civil-engineer-in-sustainable-development/ What do you know about sustainable development? The ideas have been around for a while but only recently are getting media attention. http://genun.unausa.org/10_things_you_can_do_right_now_to_help_accomplish_the_sdgs
  3. AliMohammed

    Islam on investing and shares

    Peace be with you. I've never really understood the business and economy behind investing. Could someone with (advanced) knowledge or rather experience about this, explain it to me? What does the sharia' say about investing in companies and having shares etc. What do the maraji' say? Is this something that is halal or haram? Jazakallah khair. (I have heard incoherent answers that's why i'm hoping someone would clarify this)
  4. hilal_Iskandar_gomes

    Iqtisaduna

    Dear Brothers and Sisters, I am begining an academic work about the book Iqtisaduna from Ayyatullah Al-Odhmah Seyyed Mohammad Baquer Assadr. I will peased if someone could indicate bibliography about the rlevance of the book, how it incluence the ways of economy and planning in Iranian Islamic Revolution, further developments of theory and state of art evaluations of model (references could be in English, French, Spanish, unfortunately I can not read Farsi or Arabic). Very grateful for any help.
  5. billy090

    Panama Papers

    Salam everyone. Have you guys seen this? http://panamapapers.sueddeutsche.de/articles/56febff0a1bb8d3c3495adf4/ Its a 2.6 TB of data, comprising of how international companies and influential people evaded taxation in their own countries by off-shore companies. Kindly give me input on this if anyone has more information. Pretty scary to see the numbers on the report.
  6. What is Religion! We must know about religion, what it is, to develop to know our position to it. How can we practice Islam that is a religion-not any religion but religion to the whole creation beyond derby -, without knowing about what religion is. Sure all are good and excellent followers of Islam, but Islam is a religion so what is religion again! What specific thoughts occur in you, please let us know. If it is not cool to mention I, AGAIN I AM, than maybe we should use 'you'- hmm how logical is this sentence -. Our scholars say religion has three parts-or 3 whatever - that is: Ahklaq, Aqaed and fiqh- respectively Ethic-ethical morality, belief and jurisprudence-Islamic law -. If any religion misses one of these parts, that religion is defected, handicap,or either sick but can we say it is no religion! Why Islam is the last holy religion to humanity? You have probably confronted the above question in your life! In this topic following questions should be dealt with: What is religion? What is a defected religion? If we accept the concept of religion, than why should we accept Islamic religion and not any other Ibrahimic religion; what answer is needed here? Why Islam the final stage, what can we say about the development of religion because we read in the holy Quran, some Prophets Peace upon Them said that we are muslim! Hope this topic is successful Allah will, and this 'riter a excellent host to guests participating in this topic. Please leave your view and thoughts, this servant will be frugal in using posts to develop text in this regard.
  7. beardedbaker

    The Absent Muslim Jurisprudent

    Salam All was debating whether to put this in the general discussion thread, but knowing SC, this thread will be forgotten about in a matter of days, since mutah and mahdi ism dominate discourse. What got me to writing this thread was, apart from my frustrations, the world people's conference on climate change and the rights of Mother Earth (Gaia), which was held on Bolivia. The countries attending drafted the Universal Declaration of the rights of Mother Earth. When I looked that up it led me to the Gaza foundation, and what caught my eye was, you guessed it, the clear absence of Islamic representation. So, the goal of this thread is to document the absenteeism of Islamic jurisprudence and the scholars researching fields of research working for the betterment of society and the world. Irrespective of the fiqh school you follow, I would like to expose the clear irresponsible behaviour of our religious establishment to contribute in fields we clearly could have influenced. I start with what this: there is a document produced by indegiounous people's around the world that lists the rights of Mother earth and our responsibility towards her. There are zero Muslims/Shia contribution to this document. We need to work towards a universally acceptable Islamic view on how to treat the environment as it is intended to be treated.
  8. Greetings, This is not an anti semite topic. I found this when i was looking for reasons of hatred that was directed to jews in Europe. Through studying history, it seems that usury played a key role in this situation. In the old world , there were three major religions :Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The last 2 religions forbade usury. Judaism forbade taking interests from other jews but made it ok to take it from non jews and according to some interpretations, it is an obligation upon a jew to take interest from non jew. In this wiki page, there is a mention of the role of banking in the crusades. But I am very poor in economy and can't get the whole mechanism of how it worked. would someone explain? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_banking
  9. We often hear how the rise of Western ideas of liberation and human rights have caused the loss of traditional values which have had serious consequences especially in the developing world. What is missed is the role economic forces play in the shifting of values. Standards which were hitherto backbone of morality gradually become economically nonviable. Economic development of the kind we see in South Korea, China, Brazil, India etc is hailed ad nauseam by everyone from any ideological background. Researchers swim in awe-inspiring growth figures, enriched middle and trading classes, registers of jobs, and whatnot. But there is little recognition of the cost fast economic activity levies on the host society. You can find social parallels in each country listed above of the story quoted below. Read full HERE
  10. Salam, I had to revise history in regard to who was the first who made the islamic coin. Sunni scholars claim that it was Abdul Malik bin Marwan. There is a narration that mentioned that the caliph summoned the imam al baqir from Madinah to ask him about it so imam baqir told him to change the roman coins to islamic coins. Shia scholars say that Imam Ali was the first who made the islamic coin and that imam sajjad, not al baqir, who was summoned by abdul malik and he told abdul malik to revert the coins to the way imam ali made them. Shia scholars also say that Mo'awyiah was the one who changed the islamic coins by imam ali to the coins of persia. what do you think? https://www.islam4u.com/ar/maghalat/ضربُ-النقود-في-الإسلام
  11. (bismillah) There is a common phenomena in our society where teenagers lend money to their friends in small amounts for buying a piece of candy, or some other object. At a later time, the lendee says that they want to pay back, however, the lender says that the amount of money is little and is not significant or either the lendee himself considers it insignificant. In this scenario, I raise many questions; 1) When the lender declares that the money they lent is little to be significant. a) How should the other person act? Should they force them to accept the money? b ) Are they blamed for not giving the money? c) Is this kind of loan in Islam acceptable? and is it even considered a loan? 2) When the lendee perhaps considers that the money is too little to be paid back . a) Can the other person ask for his money back even if it is little? Is this considered stinginess? b ) Should a person give a time limit as to when it should be paid back even if it is little? Forgive my ignorance to these questions, but this subject is a blank in my mind. If you can also direct me to a book that is considered with such topics or lectures, it would be very helpful. Thank you for your answers Wassalam
  12. ÈöÓúãö Çááøóåö ÇáÑøóÍúãóٰäö ÇáÑøóÍöíãö ÇáÓáÇã Úáíßã æÑÍãÉ Çááå æÈÑßÇÊå It’s old news, but I only saw this recently and it seems no one here has posted about it yet. AFP: ‘Disappearing tradition: Najaf abaya makers in decline’, Prashant Rao – Mar 8, 2011 Very sad, but there are still ʿabāyah makers out there, and I think even though they have declined in recent times and are less in number now, they will survive in future inshā’Allāh. æÚáíßã ÇáÓáÇã æÑÍãÉ Çááå æÈÑßÇÊå
  13. Iran: Special comment. The evidence continues to pour in that the US banking sanctions are imposing large penalties on Iranian consumers. Iran can still sell its oil, but cannot get paid and cannot pay for imports of rice, palm oil, tea and other imported foodstuffs and commodities. Iranian companies are in default. Today, Indian authorities reported Iran defaulted on a 90-day note to pay for the import of 200,000 tons of rice from India that was ordered last October and November.Iran also defaulted on payments for shipments of Indian tea and for 400,000 tons of Ukrainian wheat, some of which is aboard ships in Iranian ports. Ship owners refuse to allow the wheat to be offloaded. Iran also has defaulted in paying for imports of Indian tea. Ten ships are in Iranian ports but refuse to permit offloading because the Iranian rial is not negotiable as a medium of international exchange. In the past week, Iran has offered to barter gold bullion in overseas vaults and filled oil tankers for basic commodities. Comment: The collapse of the Iranian rial plus the refusal of banks and companies to deal with Iran are having serious impact. The price of everything in Iran is rising. The sanctions against Iranian banks that rely on the US dollar for international trade are proving to be devastating for everyday Iranians. In order to meet domestic demand, Iran must import more than 1 million tons of rice, of which some 70% is purchased from India. Iran produces more than 2 million tons of rice, but still must import a million tons or so from India and other states to satisfy domestic demand. I Iran has defaulted on payments because the Iranian rial is almost no longer convertible into internationally acceptable hard currency. Indian and UAE middle-man companies are going out of business because the Iranian currency is worthless, nonnegotiable. Iran's customary trade partners are experimenting with barter swaps and trades paid in local currencies, such as Indian Rupees, Malaysian Ringgit and Indonesian Rupiah. Iran relies on India for 45% of its rice imports, but on Indonesia and Malaysia for all of it palm oil imports, meaning cooking oil, margarine and other industrial uses. Iran can export but must now accept payment in currencies not traded on international markets or payment in kind. There is no predictability in the profit for traders; barter strikes at the heart of an integrated global economy, which the advanced western countries seek. The impact on the Iranian micro-economy is serious. Imported basic commodities are becoming out of reach in price and rare. If the banking sanctions continue, the Iranian standard of living must decline. Western clothes and electronics, for example, will only be available to the wealthy elite. Their possession eventually will brand the owners as non-revolutionary and not devout Shiites. The ayatollahs are not impervious to the plight of the people who must pay their salaries, but they have shown no movement on nuclear talks… yet. Resort to barter is a sign of growing national concern. Banking sanctions are proving to work far more effectively than any others. Readers should expect Iran to make overtures for new talks without making promises. Iranians are not hurting enough yet. Nevertheless, urban dwelling Iranians are likely to engage in civil disobedience if prices for staple commodities continue to rise and imported goods become unavailable at any price. KFGS Private Intelligence ========================================================================= TOUGH WORDS With the West trying to tighten the noose with sanctions, Tehran vowed to fight back and denied that the sanctions are hurting the Iranian economy. Iran's Majlis (parliament) is ready to approve a bill aimed at stopping oil exports to member states of the EU in response to their bid to embargo Iran's oil exports, local TV reported Tuesday. Also on Tuesday Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said the sanctions are old news and have been going on for 30 years. "The practical outcome of such measures (of sanctioning Iran) is the determination of the Iranian nation in implementing their outstanding goals in the framework of national interests and rights," he said. But his tough words cannot hide the fact that the sanctions are indeed taking their toll on the country's economy. Food and living costs have soared in Iran, and imported goods, such as electronic devices, have more than doubled in price from a year before. With the depreciation of the rial and its limited reserve of hard currencies, Tehran is forced to barter, trading gold and oil with international traders, to maintain a steady food supply in the country. Iran is also seeking new buyers for its oil to replace the EU, South Korea and Japan, all of which have moved to embargo Iranian oil exports. China Daily ============================================================================ By Niluksi Koswanage and Cho Mee-young Malaysia has halted palm oil exports to Iran because of payments problems and Asian oil buyers have cut crude purchases as Western sanctions tighten a financial noose around Iran. Traders in China said they would cut iron ore purchases from Iran, which are worth over $2 billion a year, because of sanctions that have forced payment defaults on Indian rice imports and prompted Ukrainian and European sellers to stop booking shipments of Ukrainian grain to the Middle East country. The problems are the most visible evidence to date that Western sanctions are squeezing Iran’s trade. Iran’s crude oil buyers, including China and Japan, are cutting purchases, reducing the OPEC producer’s earnings from its major source of the foreign exchange it needs to pay for critical imports, such as food staples. The problems have come to light after U.S. sanctions this year targeted Iran’s central bank and the European Union decided to ban Iran crude imports in an effort to force Tehran to abandon a suspected nuclear weapons programme. Iran’s rial (IRR-) has plunged as the West increased sanctions, raising the price of imports for the economy and making it difficult to find Dubai-based middlemen who can process payments to keep the country’s trade flowing. Bread and rice dominate the diet of most Iranians, many of whom can no longer afford to buy meat, now selling for about $30 a kilogram in Tehran. Bread prices have tripled since December, while rice costs about $5 per kg (2.2 lbs). Iranians earn about $350 a month on average, while officials put the poverty line at $800. Grain ships are docked outside Iranian ports, many traders have said they are not booking fresh cargoes and exports of staples to Iran such as maize are falling as collecting payment from buyers gets harder. Iran imported 62 percent of its maize, 45 percent of its rice and 59 percent of its sugar in 2010-11, but only 3 percent of its wheat, data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show. In the latest sign of Iran’s stress, trading sources in Malaysia said exporters of palm oil, used in cooking oil, confectionary and bio-diesel, had stopped supplying most of the 30,000 tonnes of the commodity Iran used to buy each month from the end of 2011. Malaysia meets half of Iran’s palm oil demand. The sanctions have made it difficult for Iranian palm oil buyers to use letters of credit and make payments via middlemen in the United Arab Emirates, they said. “Payments are not coming through and no palm oil shipper wants to risk sending the cargoes to Iran with such a tense political situation,” said a trader with direct knowledge of the deals, who declined to be identified due to the sensitivity of the issue. Metals traders in China said they would reduce iron ore purchases from Iran from March because they are worried that the sanctions will disrupt business. Iran was China’s fifth-biggest supplier of the commodity in 2011. “There’s a huge risk ahead, and many just haven’t realized it yet,” said a senior executive at a Shanghai-based trading firm that has a long-term partnership with an Iranian supplier. “It’s easy for the United States to freeze our business,” he said. “It’s not worth taking the risk.” Some Chinese traders said they would keep buying the ore from Iran as long as they were able to get paid because it was cheaper than other sources of the commodity. “Many Chinese traders, and miners, want to take the opportunity to buy the ore to make more money,” a Shanghai-based trader said. “Though I’m still making bookings from Iran, I’m extremely cautious.” Indian exporters and rice millers said on Tuesday that Iranian buyers had defaulted on $144 million in payments for rice imports from its biggest supplier. Vijay Setia, the president of the All India Rice Exporters’ Association, called on members to cease exports to Iran on credit terms. Iran’s foreign exchange earnings are also being pinched as the sanctions put major buyers, including China, Japan and India, under pressure to reduce crude imports from OPEC’s second-biggest producer. Asia purchases more than half of Iran’s 2.6 million barrels per day of crude exports and some buyers are already cutting. Media reports on Wednesday said Japan’s biggest refiner JX Nippon Oil & Energy Corp will cut 10,000 bpd of Iranian crude imports, matching reductions Cosmo Oil has made since January. In another possible indication of cuts, the United Arab Emirates’ main crude oil exporter will supply Asia with full contractual crude volumes in March for the first time in almost a year, industry sources said on Wednesday. China has drawn heavily on Saudi Arabia, OEC’s biggest producer by far, after cutting back on Iran supplies this year. Industry sources said the world’s second-biggest oil consumer is importing more cargoes from West Africa, Russia and Australia but has bought the bulk from Saudi Arabia. However, China’s decision to halve its Iranian imports is seen by industry experts as a way to negotiate lower prices from Iran, rather than as a response to Western sanctions. The sanctions lockdown has left some payments for Iran’s oil stranded. South Korea pays for its oil in its won currency, but Iran has hit a wall trying to transfer the money back to Tehran, leaving the equivalent of $5 billion sitting in South Korea banks. ==================================================== Iran is turning to barter - offering gold bullion in overseas vaults or tankerloads of oil - in return for food as new financial sanctions have hurt its ability to import basic staples for its 74 million people, commodities traders said on Thursday. Difficulty paying for urgent import needs has contributed to sharp rises in the prices of basic foodstuffs, causing hardship for Iranians with just weeks to go before an election seen as a referendum on President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's economic policies. New sanctions imposed by the United States and European Union to punish Iran for its nuclear program do not bar firms from selling Iran food but they make it difficult to carry out the international financial transactions needed to pay for it. Reuters surveys of commodities traders around the globe show that since the start of the year, Iran has had trouble securing imports of basic staples like rice, cooking oil, animal feed and tea. Grain ships have been held at its ports, refusing to unload until payment can be received for cargo. With Iran's rial currency tumbling, the prices of rice, bread and meat in Iranian bazaars have doubled or more in dollar terms in recent months. Iranian grain importers have in the past side-stepped sanctions by booking business through the United Arab Emirates, traders said, but this option was cut off by the UAE government in response to sanctions. Iran has been trading oil in currencies like Japanese yen, South Korean won and Indian rupees, but such deals make it difficult to repatriate profits. Deals revealed Thursday appear to be among the first in which Iran has had to result to offering cashless barter to avoid sanctions, a sign of new urgency as it seeks to buy food and get around the financial restrictions. Asian Age ====
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