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Found 8 results

  1. There are obvious differences among members of the human family. Not only between races, which have their own unique characteristics but individuals within the same family can exhibit a multitude of features, even if they are identical twins. The Holy Qur’an has also affirmed the differences among people: وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ خَلْقُ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضِ وَاخْتِلَافُ أَلْسِنَتِكُمْ وَأَلْوَانِكُمْ إِنَّ فِي ذَٰلِكَ لَآيَاتٍ لِّلْعَالِمِينَ “Among His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the difference of your languages and colours. There are indeed signs in that for those who know.” (30:22) Discrimination is a phenomenon that all countries of the world are confronted with and have suffered from. Discrimination has not been limited to one person, society or country. Even those nations which espouse democracy practice some form of discrimination. Discrimination means giving preference to one individual over another because of individual characteristics such as colour, gender, religion and race, rather than due to the merit of the individual. In other word, discrimination occurs when there are two people with the same abilities but one is given preference because of illogical and irrelevant reasons. For example, between a black-skinned person and a white-skinned person seeking a job, whit the same education and experience, the white-skinned person is given preference, or vice versa. http://www.islamportal.net/search/node/discrimination
  2. Muslim man in US thrown off plane for saying 'inshallah' http://presstv.com/Detail/2016/10/06/487961/Muslim-man-plane-inshallah this seems to be the new norm!!!! I have read tons of these articles lately, How sad ! If anyone dared to talk about Israeli/Zionist they would be labeled anti Semitic and probably jailed. Sad ........
  3. God is wise existence who does not oppress any of creation .This world is full of oppression and justice in this world do not ru. In this world injustice and discrimination is widespread and don not reach people to their rights Allah wise and justice on day of Judgment runs to reach anyone in his/her right and wrong doers be punished .Suppose ,sin opportunity for someone is be provided and he ignores to commit and does not commit the sin and person guilt position is not provided for him, but applies all his attempts to commit the sin .Do you think they are same?
  4. A German referee, Frank Scharmach, has been suspended for five days following his summary disqualification of Iranian heavyweight Olympic boxer Ali Mazaheri. (Story and more Pictures) http://iranianfacebook.com/2012/08/02/republic-of-azerbaijan-turkmenistan-disgrace-themselves-in-sports-world/
  5. http://www.mehrnews.com/FA/newsdetail.aspx?NewsID=1617300 http://www.rferl.org/content/iran-list-of-university-courses-banned-for-afghans/24602340.html The National Organization for Educational Testing has published of list of university degrees that are banned for Afghans living in Iran - mostly engineering, advanced science degrees, military science, etc. Mehr argues that allowing Afghans to become qualified in these areas, would create an obligation to employ them, as opposed to less qualified native Iranians. Mehr also tells us that Afghans can only apply to universities in areas where they are not already banned, including a dozen provinces and a number of cities throughout Iran. Keep in mind that a sizeable percentage of these Afghans are Shia Hazars....
  6. Houthis to Salafi Terrorists: Stop Takfir, terrorist acts, suicide bombing against civilians and religious ceremonies, or else face the consequences. ------------------------------------------------ Yemen Shiite Houthis Fight Salafist Terrorists Near Saudi Arabia’s Border Yemen’s Shiite Muslim Houthis killed 24 Salafist terrorists yesterday after a week of sporadic fighting between the two religious communities in the north of the country near the border with Saudi Arabia. The Houthis attacked the Dar Al-Hadith school in the Dammaj region in Saada, according to Abdulhamid al-Hajouri, the principal of the school. About 60 Salafists terrorists, who are considered conservative Sunnis, were wounded in the clashes, Abu Ismail, spokesman for the group in Dammaj, said in a phone interview today. Several Houthi fighters were also killed and wounded, Dhaifallah al-Shami, a leader of the Shiite group, said. Abdelmalek al-Houthi, had issued orders for a ceasefire but that the Salafis rejected it and fought on. "We have martyrs and wounded," he said. "We have informed the mediators that the Salafis can have their slogans as long as they refrain from incitement and takfir (denouncing a Muslim as an infidel)." The escalations between both groups started when Houthis claimed that Salafis are entering weapons inside their educational institutions in the town of Dammaj, and demanded that all military posts are emptied. As Salafis refused, a tightened siege against their religious school complex took place early this week. bloomberg.com Houthis rejected the power transfer signing that took place in Riyadh earlier this week and said it would not recognize it. "The movement has more than 100,000 fighters ready to obey commands from their spiritual leader, Abdul Malik al-Houthi," said Ahmed Bahri, an expert in Houthi affairs. "This movement is well organized and only has one head," Bahri said. "They now control majority areas in the provinces in Sa'ada and Jawf, and have powerful presence in Amran, Mareb, Sana'a and Hajjah," added Bahri. Sectarian violence is at peak in northern Yemen where Houthis control is spread across five provinces. Saudi Arabia fought the Houthis in 2009 but failed to end their expansion. The attacks come a day after Yemen's vice president called for presidential elections to be held in February, state media reported. CNN Recently Salafi terrorists backed by the West and Saudi Nasabis were organizing themselves to kill Shias in Northern Yemen instead of focusing on Saleh's government and the revolution of the people. Finally, Houthis are saying, enough is enough. Either live amongst Shia communities of the north in a peaceful coexistence or face the will of Allah. Houthis must hurry and expand party's influence and presence in the land and towards the sea and unite with Shia tribesmen before it is too late and again face oppression of puppets and Nawasib for another 50 years.
  7. U.S.: Shia Face Systematic and Pervasive Discrimination in Saudi Arabia Shia face systematic and pervasive official and legal discrimination, including in education, employment, the military, housing, political representation, the judiciary, religious practice, and media. Primary reasons include the widely-held view that Shia are polytheists and that they commit apostasy by practicing some of their worship activities, historical Sunni-Shia animosity, and suspicion of Iranian influence on their actions. (Ahlul Bayt News Agency) - US secretary of state Hillary Clinton expressed deep concern about the Saudi government which denies its people the most fundamental human rights : the right to believe according to their own conscience – including the freedom to not believe or not follow the religion favored by its ; the right to practice their religion freely, without risking discrimination, arrest, or violence; and the right to educate their children in their own religious traditions; and the freedom to express their beliefs. The Saudi government did not respect religious freedom in law, but generally permitted Shi'a religious gatherings and non-Muslim private religious practices. Muslims who did not adhere to the government's interpretation of Islam faced significant political, economic, legal, social, and religious discrimination, including limited employment and educational opportunities, underrepresentation in official institutions, restrictions on religious practice, and restrictions on places of worship and community centers. In Saudi Arabia , authorities continue to repress Shi'a Muslims, Sulaimaniya Isma'ilis , and others who do not share the government’s religious views. Now, as you know, the protection of religious freedom is a fundamental concern of the United States going back to the earliest days of our republic, and it remains so today. U.S. Department of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor July-December, 2010 International Religious Freedom Report September 13, 2011 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saudi Arabia The laws and policies restrict religious freedom, and in practice, the government generally enforced these restrictions. Freedom of religion is neither recognized nor protected under the law and is severely restricted in practice. The country is an Islamic state governed by a monarchy; the king is head of both state and government. According to the basic law, Sunni Islam is the official religion and the country's constitution is the Qur'an and the Sunna (traditions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad). The legal system is based on the government's application of the Hanbali School of Sunni Islamic jurisprudence. The public practice of any religion other than Islam is prohibited, and there is no separation between state and religion. The government did not respect religious freedom in law, but generally permitted Shia religious gatherings and non-Muslim private religious practices. Some Muslims who did not adhere to the government's interpretation of Islam faced significant political, economic, legal, social, and religious discrimination, including limited employment and educational opportunities, underrepresentation in official institutions, restrictions on religious practice, and restrictions on places of worship and community centers. ..... Although many intolerant statements had been removed, some school textbooks continued to contain overtly intolerant statements against Jews and Christians and intolerant references by allusion against Shia and Sufi Muslims and other religious groups. For example they stated that apostates from Islam should be killed if they do not repent within three days of being warned and that treachery is a permanent characteristic of non-Muslims, especially Jews. ...Shiites constitute 10 to 15 percent of the population. Approximately 80 percent of Shia are "Twelvers" (followers of Muhammad ibn Hasan al-Mahdi, whom they recognize as the Twelfth Imam) and are primarily located in the Eastern Province. Twelver Shia adhere to the Jafari school of jurisprudence. Most of the remaining Shiite population are Sulaimaniya Isma'ilis, also known as "Seveners" (those who branched off from the Twelvers to follow Isma'il ibn Jafar as the Seventh Imam).Seveners reside primarily in Najran Province, around the residence of their sect's spiritual leader in Al Mansourah. In the western Hejaz region, there are approximately 100,000 Ashraf (descendants of the Prophet Muhammad) and 150,000 Nakhawala, or "Medina Shia." Additionally, statistics put the number of Zaydis (followers of Zayd ibn Ali, whom they recognize as the fifth Imam) at approximately 500,000. The Zaydis reside primarily in the cities of Jizan and Najran along the border with Yemen. ...The government permits Shiite judges presiding over courts in the Eastern Province to use the Jafari school of Islamic jurisprudence to adjudicate cases in family law, inheritance, and endowment management. There were six Shiite judges, all located in the Eastern Province cities of Qatif and al-Ahsa, where the majority of Shia lived. Shia living in other parts of the Eastern Province, Najran Province, and the western Hejaz region had no access to local, regional, or national Shiite courts. Shia face systematic and pervasive official and legal discrimination, including in education, employment, the military, housing, political representation, the judiciary, religious practice, and media. Primary reasons include the widely-held view that Shia are polytheists and that they commit apostasy by practicing some of their worship activities, historical Sunni-Shia animosity, and suspicion of Iranian influence on their actions. ...Unlike for Sunni mosques, the government does not finance construction or maintenance of Shiite mosques, and the process for obtaining a government-required license for a Shiite mosque is reportedly unclear and arbitrary. However, Shia have the right to manage their own mosques and to be supervised by Shiite scholars... Shiite courts' powers are limited by the fact that any litigant who disagrees with a ruling can seek a new decision from a Sunni court. Sunni court rulings can void Shiite court rulings, and government departments can choose not to implement judgments rendered by Shiite judges. Jurisdictionally these courts are only allowed to rule on cases in the Qatif and al-Ahsa areas; Shia from other regions cannot use such courts. Most Shia expressed general concerns about discrimination in religious practice, education, employment, political representation, the judiciary, and the media. The government generally limited public religious practice to activities that conform to the official interpretation of Islam. Practices that diverged from the official interpretation, such as celebrating Maulid Al-Nabi (the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad) and visits to the tombs of renowned Muslims, were forbidden. Enforcement was more relaxed in some communities than in others. For example, authorities allowed Shia in the Eastern Province city of Qatif greater freedom in their religious practices, including the public commemoration of Ashura (the "day of grief"). This event was held with minimal government interference. In other areas with large Shiite populations, such as al-Ahsa and Dammam, authorities restricted Shiite religious activities, including public observances of Ashura, public marches, loudspeaker broadcasts of clerics' lectures from Shiite community centers, and, in some instances, gatherings within those centers. Shia described restrictions on their visits to Mecca and Medina as interference by Riyadh-based authorities in private Muslim worship. In addition government religious authorities continued the practice of destroying ancient Islamic historical sites. Shiite mosques in mixed religious neighborhoods reportedly were required to recite the Sunni call to prayer, which is distinct from the Shiite call, at prayer times. Moreover, although Shia combine two of the five daily Sunni prayers, Shiite businessmen were often forced to close their shops during all five prayer times, in accordance with the country's official Sunni practices. Link To Full Report http://abna.ir/data.asp?lang=3&id=266230
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