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Found 79 results

  1. Salamun Alaykum, My name is Mehdi. I am from India and I am travelling to Salt Lake City, Utah, on 29th Dec. I will be attending graduate program at the University of Utah. I need to know Shia brothers and community centres who can help me get a rented apartment near the U (zipcode :84102) (The apartment should not be expensive). We are 3 students(the other 2 are not shia) who will reach SLC on 29th Dec 11pm. Kindly help connect me to the Student body/ Shia centres around here in Utah. I need this urgently done. Thank you for your help.:)
  2. Trump says Saudi King wouldn't last 'two weeks' without US support https://edition.cnn.com/2018/10/03/politics/trump-saudi-king-intl/index.html
  3. Salam, My husband and I would like to go for Umrah this year. I was wondering if anyone can recommend any shia travel agencies that can help us from the US? I would prefer one in Texas, but open to anywhere in the US. Does anyone know of any shia groups going to Umrah during Ramadan? And is it permissible to do Umrah during Ramadan? We just want to go for a maximum of 3 days, possibly the last 3 days of Ramadan.
  4. https://www.globalresearch.ca/isis-is-a-us-israeli-creation-top-ten-indications/5518627 Indication #1: ISIS Foreknowledge via Leaked DIA Doc Indication #2: ISIS Never Attacks Israel Indication #3: Toyota Trucks Indication #4: ISIS’ First Class Social Media Skills Indication #5: Israeli Group SITE First to Release ISIS Footage Indication #6: ISIS Leader Baghdadi a Mossad Agent Indication #7: Leaked Cables Showing US Plotting Syrian Overthrow Indication #8: Russia Bombs ISIS, US Protects ISIS Indication #9: ISIS Always the Excuse for Further Intervention Indication #10: ISIS is an Acronym for Mossad. [The Israeli Secret Intelligence Service. Interesting Coincidence]
  5. Why release now your mantra Mr. Putin ? It has been quite long time the dog barking. http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/01/31/550746/putin-russia-us-sanctions
  6. A Christian Nation? Ryan LaMothe Photo by Forsaken Fotos | CC BY 2.0 Over the years I have often heard Christians of various political stripes assert that the United States is a Christian nation. More recently, Christian evangelicals, who supported Trump and his campaign slogan of “Make America Great Again,” seemed nostalgic for a white Christian America. One might be tempted to call the belief that the U.S. is a Christian nation a myth, the seeds of which were sown in 1630 when John Winthrop challenged his community to establish a city on the hill, reflecting the covenant of God and Christian charity. Many myths contain a grain or two of truth. Nevertheless, the belief in a Christian nation is more illusion than truth. This might be a provocative claim to many people that requires justification. Let me begin by acknowledging that most of the people who immigrated to America, taking native peoples’ lands, were primarily of various Christian denominations. Some saw this country as the new Promised Land, overlooking the fact that by occupying the land they removed any possibility of promise to the non-Christian people who lived here for millennia. So, I am willing to concede that white European settlers were mainly Christian. This was also true after the War of Independence and in this sense one might say this was a Christian nation in that most of the settlers called themselves Christian. I will come back to this, but for now let me say that this new “Christian nation” was clearly neither a Christian theocracy not a parliamentary system advocating a particular religion. Indeed, the Constitution enshrined the free exercise of religion, while establishing a wall between church and state. If we were to call this budding nation a Christian nation, it was oddly one that proclaimed the freedom of individuals to practice other religions—at least ideally—or no religion at all. Proclaiming the inalienable right of religious freedom would leave open the possibility that another religion might be dominant, which would mean we would no longer be a “Christian nation.” While some people cite numbers or percentage of Christians as a reason for calling the U.S. a Christian nation, others have argued that the U.S. is a Christian nation because it was founded by Christians and, therefore, some of their beliefs and principles were woven into the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. In reality, the Magna Carta and English Bill of Rights influenced those who penned the Constitution. Also, House Congressional Resolution 331 (1988) acknowledged the influence of the Iroquois Confederacy of Nations in writing the U.S. Constitution. To be sure there are references to God in the Declaration of Independence, but not in the Constitution, which is not to deny that Christian principles, to some degree, shaped the writing of the Constitution, though it is not entirely clear which principles. More apparent is the secular political influences that shaped founding texts. Indeed, it is more accurate to say the U.S. was founded on English and Enlightenment political values. This will not deter those who will insist that since most colonial and later U.S. citizens nation were Christian, then the U.S. was, by and large, a Christian nation. Fast forward to the present and polls indicate that approximately 84% of people in the U.S. identify as Christians. So, our stalwart believer may proclaim that we are still a Christian nation by percentages alone. Of course, we might look more closely at those numbers to discover that many of those who self-identify as Christians do not actually belong to a Christian community of faith. In some polling less than 38% of Christians actually go to church. What percentage do we rely on for being a Christian nation—51% or above of those who believe in Christ? Or do we count those who are actually practicing their Christian faith? If it is the latter, then we do not qualify as a Christian nation. Percentages and numbers, though, are hardly adequate measures for determining whether we are a Christian nation or not. It would seem fairer to consider not so much belief, but whether the majority of citizens and their elected representatives embody and live out core principles associated with Christianity. This would be akin to considering whether the claim that we are a democratic nation is valid based on whether citizens and institutions uphold and live out the principles and practices of democracy. Do citizens act in democratic ways? Are there state and non-state institutions that uphold democratic values and principles? Let’s shift to whether we are a “Christian” nation. Do citizens and elected officials adhere to the core principles of Christianity as reflected in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ? Do state and non-state institutions promote Christian principles and practices? The simple answer is no, but it is important to at least identify a few key principles of Christianity. It is apparent in any cursory reading of history that there are various renderings of what it means to live a Christian life. Yet, it is safe to say that the ministry of Jesus Christ incarnates the love and compassion of God, which includes mercy and forgiveness. As Karen Armstrong (1993) notes, the three Abrahamic faiths elevate compassion as a central principle for living a religious life. If we consider love, compassion, mercy, and forgiveness as central principles of being a Christian, then it is evident that these principles are less about mere belief than they are about actions or practices. I think most individual Christians and communities of faith, if they are honest, would say that they fall short of living out these principles. Indeed, Kierkegaard, surveying the landscape of Christian Europe, asked whether a Christian could be found in all of Christendom. No doubt he was aware of how far he and others fail to live out and up to Jesus Christ. More importantly, his query was not just about individuals, but calling Christendom itself into question. Individuals who call themselves Christian should be assessed in terms of the principles of Christianity, not so much to deny their identity, but to indicate to what degree they live out this faith. Those of us who call ourselves Christian know we do not measure up, yet we retain a Christian identity. When individuals use the term Christian to describe their nation, which includes identity, then it is fair game to use the principles as criteria. What does it mean to be called a Christian nation given the violent appropriation of land from Native Americans, which may rightly be called ethnic cleansing? Our ruthless treatment of Native peoples, which continues today, seems a far cry from any Christian principle. Consider how many American Christians legitimated slavery, Jim Crow, and racism. By what Christian principle do these fall under? The exploitation of Cuban, Philippine, and Central American peoples during the decades when the U.S. was a colonial power seems more in line with the principles of the Roman Empire than Christian values. The fire bombings of Dresden and Tokyo and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. Has the U.S. ever asked for forgiveness for these acts? This kind of sociopathic brutality is a far cry from Christian compassion, though it is important to acknowledge that Christian communities perpetrated if not supported brutal actions (e.g., lynching). Let’s turn to the killing of around 2 million Vietnamese, which was more in line with the principles of realpolitik than Christian justice. Speaking of justice, read Acts and ask how Christian is it to have huge income and wealth disparities, millions of people without healthcare or inadequate healthcare, food deserts, and 7 million people in the penal system. Does this so-called Christian nation embody or even uphold any of the core values of Christianity? If this is not enough to dissuade people from calling the U.S. a Christian nation, I also raise the fact that I am not sure any nation could be Christian, except in only one sense and that is the view that we are a Christian nation because most citizens self-identify as Christian. That said, it is crucial to recognize that while religious communities can hold forth about their Christian values and principles vis-à-vis organizing the life of the community, nations abide by other principles, principles more in line with Machiavelli and Clausewitz, rather than Christ. To be sure, Constantine launched the West onto the idea of a Christian state, but this idea seemed to be far from anything Jesus had in mind. Moreover, Christ’s motivation, if I can talk about his motivation, seemed to be more about compassion, feeding the poor, healing the sick, etc., than it was about founding a nation. In short, Jesus’ kingdom is not to be found on earth, even though the kingdom of God is among us in acts of love, mercy, compassion, and forgiveness. These are virtues that are inimical the advancement of a nation state, let alone, an empire. So, let’s be honest and acknowledge that the U.S. and its government do not and, perhaps, cannot uphold Christian principles in organizing social or international relations. For this reason, we cannot claim the U.S. is a Christian nation. But I am not sanguine about people accepting this, especially those Christian individuals who are more likely to think of themselves as staunch patriots. By adhering to this belief, more accurately an illusion, they avoid facing the fact that the fundamental principles that actually operate in state-craft, namely, ruthless, rational calculation in the advancement of U.S. economic and political interests, are contrary to Christian principles used to organize the first Christian communities, namely sacrificial love, compassion, forgiveness, and distribution of resources according to needs. I also think there are a few other reasons why many Christian Americans are steadfast in their belief that the U.S. is a Christian nation. First, Christianity has long been the dominant religious tradition in this country and has become, for many, intertwined with a national identity. Even if people recognize that one can be American and from other faith traditions, patriotic Christians’ identity is wedded to national identity. To begin to believe we are not a Christian nation can evoke anxiety and rage because it is a threat to that identity. A second reason for retaining this illusion is that it deflects one from the inherent cruelty of the state’s actions (e.g., drone warfare and the killing of civilians, policing the poor). Even when we find ways to justify violence (e.g., they attacked us first—just war), we can continue to hold out that we are Christian nation. “Christian” denotes something good, unsullied by our excesses. It is analogous to someone saying, after being cruel to someone, “All have sinned. I know this as a Christian and that God still loves me.” Pasting the title Christian over the notion of the state or nation is like trying to cover over the indelible stain of our national sins. Third and relatedly, to come face to face with ourselves, as Carl Jung noted, is a terrible shock for we will see how far we really are from our cherished ideals of ourselves. Our shared histories, which undergird our shared identities, are, more often than not, facades that screen the reality of wrong on the throne and right on the scaffold (Niebuhr, 1941, p. 40). Better to hold onto the soporific illusions of the title “Christian” than to face our collective past and present sins. As James Baldwin noted Americans “have the most remarkable ability to alchemize all bitter truths into an innocuous but piquant confection and to transform their moral contradictions, into a proud decoration” (1955, p.31)—the proud decoration that we are a Christian nation. Baldwin also wrote, “(F)or there is a great deal of will power involved in the white man’s naïveté” (p.166)—a naiveté fostered by the illusion of a Christian America. So, there are three basic rationales for citizens proclaiming the U.S. is a Christian nation. The first is the view that sheer numbers of people who believe in Christ indicates we are a Christian nation, but this fails because of the low percentages of people who actually practice some version of Christian faith. More importantly it also fails because the Constitution not only does not proclaim this, but actually leaves open the possibility of some other religion having greater numbers of believers, let alone practitioners. A second argument is that the founding documents of the nation are heavily influenced by Christian beliefs and principles. This might seem to be true, but the reality is that there were other influences, including those of Native peoples. Third, individuals may claim that we are a Christian nation because Christian principles and values guide how we understand ourselves and organize society. The truth, however, is that the United States has operated out of other principles more suited to Machiavellian principles of statecraft. One might ask why is it so important to rid ourselves of the illusion that we are a Christian nation. What good will come of it? Isn’t holding this belief an inducement to live out a more moral existence as a nation? As for the second question, one need only go down the depressively long list of cruel, destructive, exploitive, and oppressive actions perpetrated in the name of a Christian nation to see that it has not been an inducement to live a more moral life, though people like Martin Luther King Jr. and others used this to [Edited Out] the consciences of white Americans. If we work to get rid of or limit this illusion, people of other religious and secular faiths may feel more at home in the U.S. Perhaps another benefit would be a growing awareness of the misdeeds done under the name of Christian nation. In facing the sins of our past, there might be a sliver of hope for change. As James Baldwin (2010) notes, “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced” (p.34). Notes. Armstrong, K. (1993). A History of God. New York: Ballantine Books. Baldwin, J. (1955). Notes of a Native Son. Boston, MA: Beacon Press. Baldwin, J. (2010). The Cross of Redemption: Uncollected writings. New York: Pantheon. Kierkegaard, S. (1846). Concluding unscientific postscript to the philosophical fragments: A mimic-pathetic-dialectic composition: An existential contribution, by Johannes Climacus. Responsible for publication: S. Kierkegaard. Trans. D. Swenson and W. Lowrie (1941). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Niebuhr, H. R. (1941). Meaning and revelation. New York: Collier Books.
  7. Muharram is the first month of the Islamic calendar. On the first day of Muharram, the Islamic New Year is observed by Muslims. The Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, and is 11 to 12 days shorter than the solar year. Hence it is a little different from the Gregorian calender that is used in the western nations. When compared with the Gregorian calendar, which is a solar calendar, the lunar month of Muharram shifts from year to year. The month of Muharram is of great religious significance to Islamic people the world over. It is held to be the most sacred of all the months, excluding Ramadan. The word "Muharram" is often considered synonymous with "Ashura", the tenth day of the Muharram month. "Ashura" is a highly important day for both sects of Islam - the Shias and the Sunnis. The Shia muslims believe that Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, became a martyr at the Battle of Karbala on the tenth day of Muharram in 61 AH(680 AD). The pre-Islamic period in the Arabian peninsula was the era of warring tribes. In the absence of a strong leadership, there were conflicts and battles on minor issues. But fighting was prohibited in four months of the year. These months, of which Muharram was one, were considered sacred. Muharram is so called because it was unlawful to fight during this month; the word is derived from the word ‘haram’ meaning forbidden. This period of inactivity was a necessity in heavily decorated replicas of the tomb of the Imam and his family are made for Muharram the era of warring tribes. The tradition was maintained even after the advent of Islam, though provisions to accommodate and accept war in special situations, like a threat to the sovereignty of an empire, were introduced. The gory battle of Karbala was fought against this law and tradition of Islam. The inhabitants on the banks of rivers Euphrates and Tigris were traditional rivals. Their animosity was contained to some extent by Muhammad. But when his son-in-law Hazrat Ali was the Caliph(Muslim civil and religious leader considered to be Allah's representative on earth), the old enmity re-surfaced. Hazrat Ali had two descendants, Hazrat Imam Hussain and Hazrat Imam Hassan. Hussain was the ruler of the part of the empire known today as Iran. The other part in modern Iraq was ruled by the Umayyads. Hussain was called upon by the Shiahs of Kufa, a small town in the Umayyad kingdom, to accept their allegiance and claim his place as the leader of the Islamic community. This was against the wishes of the ruler of Kufa, Yazid, who instructed his governor, Ibn-e-Ziad to take appropriate action. Meanwhile, in response to the call of the Shiahs, Hussain accompanied by his family members, headed for Kufa. When they reached Karbala, en route to Kufa, the forces of the governor surrounded them and their 70 men. Hussain, his family and his troops were tortured and killed, and Hussain's head was severed and presented to the king. They received no help from the Shiahs of Kufa. As this tragic incident happened on the tenth day of Muharram, Shia Muslims consider this a day of sorrow. They commemorate the martyrdom of Hussain as a religious occassion called "Muharram" (named after the month of its observance). The occassion starts on the 1st day of Muharram and lasts for 10 days until 10th of Muharram. As Muharram approaches, they put on black clothes, as black is regarded as a color of mourning. During the entire 10 day period, they keep themselves away from music and all joyous events (e.g. weddings) that can distract them in anyway from the sorrowful remembrance of that day. During each of the first nine days of Muharram, "Majalis" (assemblies) are held where Shia orators vividly depict the incident of the martyrdom of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his party. Mainstream Shia Muslims fast until the evening. On "Ashura", devoted Muslims assemble and go out in large processions. They parade the streets holding banners and carrying models of the mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his people, who fell at Karbala. Some Shia sects observe "Ashura" by beating themselves with chains in public, cutting themselves with knives and sharp objects and holding mournful public processions. This is an expression of their grief on the death of their favourite leader Hussain, considered to be the representative of Allah. (But no Shiite scholar affirms any extreme behavior that harms the body and Shia leaders consider such acts as "Haram", or forbidden.) It is a sad occasion and everyone in the procession chants "Ya Hussain", wailing loudly. Generally a white horse is beautifully decorated and included in the procession. It serves to bring back the memory of the empty mount of Hazrat Imam Husain after his martyrdom. Drinking posts are also set up temporarily by the Shia community where water and juices are served to all, free of charge. While Shia Muslims consider "Muharram" to be a sorrowful occassion, Sunni Muslims observe it as a festival and look at "Ashura" as a happy day though the religious aspect remain intact. Pious Sunnis keep a fast("roja") on "Ashura" as per the "Hadith"(a tradition based on reports of the sayings and activities of Muhammad and his companions) of Prophet Muhammad. According to the "Hadith", the Prophet saw the Jews fasting on the 10th of Muharram to commemorate their liberation from Egyptian slavery and the extermination of the army of the Pharoah in the waters of the Red Sea. Prophet Mohammed liked the custom for he believed that it was Allah who saved the Israelites from their enemy in Egypt. He started to fast on the same day as the Jews but he planned to fast on the 9th and 10th from the following year. But death came in between him and his pious wish. Usually, Sunni Muslims are recommended to fast either on the 9th and 10th Muharram or on the 10th and 11th
  8. Salam, Can someone please provide contacts or links for scholarships for Shia students (MS/MBA) from India, studying in the United States (If any scholarship like this is available though). Thanks in advance
  9. http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2017/08/25/532857/Syria-Assad-US-Saudi-Arabia In a major policy U-turn, US and Saudi diplomats have reportedly been urging the armed Syrian opposition to come to terms with President Bashar al-Assad’s role in Syria’s future as Damascus’ army irreversibly holds the upper hand on the battlefield against militant groups.
  10. Salaam everyone. I am very nervous about who's going to win. Trump is slightly edging out Hillary Clinton. I fear for the Muslims living in the US. I fear that something bad might happen. I really hope they are ready for when Trump starts his plan of banning Muslims, they need to find a safe place to reside. Luckily, I am in Canada which is a very safe home where I was born. I am fine with Justin Trudeau as prime minister succeeding Stephen Harper (who was going to make things worse for Muslims). Justin Trudeau is not that racist towards Muslims like Trump is, he is actually nice when compared to the racist garbage that Trump spews out. Canada is a good home for Muslims. I am really worried as I am writing this. I really do not want Trump to win.
  11. Salaam, can someone let me know where I can order customized authentic gemstone rings online or someone who has such a business? I live in the USA. Thank you in advance
  12. Salaam. I am Masters student in reputed American Universities. Alhamdullilah! I was able to get scholarship which pays my most of the tuition fee but still I have to pay $4k in this (spring semester) to cover Health insurance and other fees. I want to know about any Shia foundation which provides educational scholarship in USA. It can be Muslim foundation in general or even any organisation for that matter so that I can continue my studies. Thank-you. Iltemas-e-dua for my scholarship
  13. Selaam Alaikum I saw a video of a 15 min interview with CNN ( Zionist media ) I know some have a bad image of David Duke and think he is not a good person, while I most of the time on the biggest part do not agree with these people. I would like to know what you think about the anwsers in the video of this same Dr. Duke. I myself do agree with him on what is being said in the video, this is what I would like to see your opinions about, about this interview and not about for example David Duke in general. Thank you in advance
  14. In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful An Important Announcement Regarding Participation in the Elections Dear Believers in the United States, May peace be upon you, and the mercy and blessings of God. As we are approaching the November elections, we would like to remind our beloved readers that every general election is not just about the Presidential election, rather it encompasses important issues that affect the lives of all Americans. These issues include matters pertaining to state and county laws as well as representatives. As such, we have reissued our February notification below in the hope that it will answer questions addressed to I.M.A.M. about the position of the supreme religious authority. We are continuing to see a rise in the number of questions on the participation of Muslims in the national, state, and local elections in the United States and who they should vote for. This announcement will serve to address such issues once more, however, please note from the outset that I.M.A.M. does not and will not endorse any candidate or political entity as it is a non-profit organization. The right of American citizenship is accompanied by a number of responsibilities toward our nation—a country with many diverse ethnic and religious communities. I.M.A.M. has made clear on many occasions that the position of the supreme religious authority is to encourage the believers to practice their constitutional rights according to the principle of good citizenry and integration while preserving their religious identity and noble culture. The subject of participating in elections, whether as voters or candidates, is an example of this principle. It is also mentioned in ‘A Code of Practice for Muslims in the West’ that, “At times the higher interests of the Muslims in non-Muslim countries demand that Muslims seek membership of political parties, enter parliaments, and representative assemblies. In such cases, it is permissible for Muslims to engage in such activities as much as is demanded by the interest [of the Muslim community] that must be identified by consulting the trustworthy experts” (A Code of Practice for Muslims in the West, No. 223). In the past decade, Islamophobia has been on the rise and is being used to attract votes from ultraconservative groups. Some media outlets, as well as a number of political leaders, have been portraying Islam in a repulsive manner, such that the true face of Islam is being replaced by stereotypes and false characterizations. Accordingly, it is our duty as Muslim-Americans to bring the true face of Islam to our fellow Americans, revealing to the world the true essence of our enlightened and uplifting religion, through involvement in our communities and to make our voices heard in our nation. An effective way to do so is through participation in local politics and by voting in the general elections. Nevertheless, voting without a full understanding of the issues and standpoints of politicians on local, national, and international policies can be harmful. As such, community members are strongly encouraged to research candidates and political topics in order to make an informed decision. I.M.A.M. expended its efforts in gathering a number of experienced and trustworthy experts and activists who met with religious scholars and discussed this subject and its various aspects during the 12th annual conference of the Council of Shia Muslim Scholars of North America and provided essential recommendations to the believers. Thus, we deem it important to stress the need for Muslims to understand their role in the future of their homelands1; and fully practice their constitutional rights to contribute to the development of their countries and the advancement of their societies. This subject needs more intense consultation2; and cooperation3; among members of the community so that every vote counts. Through true citizenship and real unity, the Muslim-American communities can surely make a huge difference in the present and the future of the United States of America and, indeed, the world. If you are still not registered to vote, you can register online. May peace, mercy, and the blessings of God, be upon you. I.M.A.M. View Original
  15. Iranian ships in Gulf of Aden: How far might Yemen escalation go? RT: Now there are Iranian warships in the Gulf of Aden. How far might this escalation over Yemen go? Sayed Mohammad Marandi: I don’t think this is all that important. The Iranians have a permanent presence in that part of the world because of the problems with shipping thanks to the American policies over the past few decades. There is a lot of instability in the Red Sea. And the Iranian ships are there basically to prevent pirates from boarding Iranian ships. They’ve been doing this for a number of years now. The Iranians have also protected the ships of other countries as well. The problem really is the US presence. Iranians are confident the Americans are lying about missile attacks on American vessels. They say this is a fabricated story that the US could enter the fray on behalf of Saudi Arabia to boost Saudi morale. Because after all the Saudis after bombing weddings, funerals, schools and hospitals despite the fact that the Western media is completely silent about it and Western leaders like Boris Johnson don’t seem to care about the Yemenis who are being massacred in the country. But despite all that the Saudis are losing the war. They have lost the war. And the Yemeni resistance, the Houthis and Ansar Allah and the Yemeni army they have succeeded in defeating Saudi-backed forces and Saudi forces on the border between Yemen and Saudi Arabia. The Iranians feel that their presence is one to help facilitate trade and shipping while the American presence as in the past few decades is only serving to create further chaos. RT: Isn’t it a danger here that now both sides will see each other as a threat?I MM: The Iranians believe that the Americans have already lost the war in Yemen. Their support for Saudi Arabia has failed. And the Americans are just as responsible for the atrocities in Yemen as is the Saudi regime. The American president has blood on his hands just like the Saudi King, Crown Prince and the Deputy Crown Prince. The Iranians feel the Americans are not really in a position to escalate further. What they want to do is put pressure on Ansar Allah so that the Saudis could negotiate from a stronger position. And also I think in order to increase pressure on the US after the Saudi regime deliberately targeted the funeral killing 150 people and injuring hundreds more. A lot of people in the West have been increasingly protesting in the media and otherwise against America’s support for the Wahhabi regime https://www.rt.com/op-edge/362805-iran-us-yemen-saudi-gulf/
  16. The conflict in Syria is part of Washington’s prime goal to impose global hegemony, President Bashar Assad told a Russian newspaper. Terrorists in Syria, he said, are being used by the US and its Gulf allies to assert control over the region, primarily to weaken Iran. In the Syrian conflict, the US is using terrorists to achieve its own and its allies’ objectives in the wider Middle East, the main goal of which is to weaken Damascus’ regional ally – Iran. In 2011, when the Syrian conflict began, world powers were negotiating with Iran over its atomic enrichment program. “It was the main issue around the world, and Syria has to convince Iran to go against its interests, that time. France tried, Saudi Arabia wanted us at that time to be away from Iran with no reason, just because they hate Iran,”Assad said, adding that Damascus received offers to that end after the conflict started in Syria. “The offers [from Saudi Arabia] started after the crisis ... because they wanted to use the crisis ... 'if you do this, we're going to help you'... that if you move away from Iran and you announce that you disconnect all kinds of relations with Iran, we’re going to help you. Very simple and very straight to the point,”the Syrian leader said. https://www.rt.com/news/362720-us-hegemony-terrorism-assad/
  17. Should a Muslim vote for Donald Trump? Yes or no? It doesn't matter if you don't live in USA - just imagine that you could vote.
  18. Aggressor squadron? Pics of US jets painted in Russian colors spark Syria false flag conspiracy https://www.rt.com/viral/362321-us-jets-russian-colors/
  19. I don't know whether this was posted here before or not, so if repetitive, forgive me for sharing it . This was made in memory of those who died by the missile of US navy force to the none military Iranian airplane, which was intentionally because the commander of the battle ship which did it was awarded with medal of honor(dishonor)
  20. The Real Reason America Used Nuclear Weapons Against Japan. It Was Not To End the War Or Save Lives. By Washington's Blog / globalresearch.ca Like all Americans, I was taught that the U.S. dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in order to end WWII and save both American and Japanese lives. But most of the top American military officials at the time said otherwise. The U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey group, assigned by President Truman to study the air attacks on Japan, produced a report in July of 1946 that concluded (52-56): General (and later president) Dwight Eisenhower – then Supreme Commander of all Allied Forces, and the officer who created most of America’s WWII military plans for Europe and Japan – said: Newsweek, 11/11/63, Ike on Ike Eisenhower also noted (pg. 380): Admiral William Leahy – the highest ranking member of the U.S. military from 1942 until retiring in 1949, who was the first de facto Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and who was at the center of all major American military decisions in World War II – wrote (pg. 441): General Douglas MacArthur agreed (pg. 65, 70-71): Moreover (pg. 512): Similarly, Assistant Secretary of War John McLoy noted (pg. 500): Under Secretary of the Navy Ralph Bird said: War Was Really Won Before We Used A-Bomb, U.S. News and World Report, 8/15/60, pg. 73-75. He also noted (pg. 144-145, 324): General Curtis LeMay, the tough cigar-smoking Army Air Force “hawk,” stated publiclyshortly before the nuclear bombs were dropped on Japan: The Vice Chairman of the U.S. Bombing Survey Paul Nitze wrote (pg. 36-37, 44-45): Deputy Director of the Office of Naval Intelligence Ellis Zacharias wrote: Ellis Zacharias, How We Bungled the Japanese Surrender, Look, 6/6/50, pg. 19-21. Brigadier General Carter Clarke – the military intelligence officer in charge of preparing summaries of intercepted Japanese cables for President Truman and his advisors – said(pg. 359): Many other high-level military officers concurred. For example: British officers were of the same mind. For example, General Sir Hastings Ismay, Chief of Staff to the British Minister of Defence, said to Prime Minister Churchill that “when Russia came into the war against Japan, the Japanese would probably wish to get out on almost any terms short of the dethronement of the Emperor.” On hearing that the atomic test was successful, Ismay’s private reaction was one of “revulsion.” Why Were Bombs Dropped on Populated Cities Without Military Value? Even military officers who favored use of nuclear weapons mainly favored using them on unpopulated areas or Japanese military targets … not cities. For example, Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy Lewis Strauss proposed to Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal that a non-lethal demonstration of atomic weapons would be enough to convince the Japanese to surrender … and the Navy Secretary agreed (pg. 145, 325): General George Marshall agreed: Historians Agree that the Bomb Wasn’t Needed Historians agree that nuclear weapons did not need to be used to stop the war or save lives. As historian Doug Long notes: Politicians Agreed Many high-level politicians agreed. For example, Herbert Hoover said (pg. 142): Under Secretary of State Joseph Grew noted (pg. 29-32): Why Then Were Atom Bombs Dropped on Japan? If dropping nuclear bombs was unnecessary to end the war or to save lives, why was the decision to drop them made? Especially over the objections of so many top military and political figures? One theory is that scientists like to play with their toys: However, most of the Manhattan Project scientists who developed the atom bomb were opposed to using it on Japan. Albert Einstein – an important catalyst for the development of the atom bomb (but not directly connected with the Manhattan Project) – said differently: Indeed, some of the Manhattan Project scientists wrote directly to the secretary of defensein 1945 to try to dissuade him from dropping the bomb: Political and Social Problems, Manhattan Engineer District Records, Harrison-Bundy files, folder # 76, National Archives (also contained in: Martin Sherwin, A World Destroyed, 1987 edition, pg. 323-333). The scientists questioned the ability of destroying Japanese cities with atomic bombs to bring surrender when destroying Japanese cities with conventional bombs had not done so, and – like some of the military officers quoted above – recommended a demonstration of the atomic bomb for Japan in an unpopulated area. The Real Explanation? History.com notes: New Scientist reported in 2005: John Pilger points out: We’ll give the last word to University of Maryland professor of political economy – and former Legislative Director in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and Special Assistant in the Department of State – Gar Alperovitz: http://www.filmsforaction.org/news/the-real-reason-america-used-nuclear-weapons-against-japan-it-was-not-to-end-the-war-or-save-lives/ In Summary: 1. Japan was going to surrender. The bombs were not necessary. 2. USA could have dropped the bomb on a military target, or a sparsely populated area, but chose to drop it on populated cities with no military value 3. It was done to scare Russia. It had nothing to do with ending WW2 or saving lives
  21. Salam to all, I have a question in mind. When we had a foreign intervention in Lebanon, Nasrallah emerged and now is consider a leader of Shias and as a source of protection, welfare and rights of Shia in lebanon. When we had a foreign intervention of Iraq in Iran, Ayatollah Khomenei emerged from Iran, totally altered the Iran. But my question is, when there was a foreign intervention of USA in Iraq, we had a chance to alter the Iraq but on the contrary Ayatollah Sistani avoided it for some reasons. Iraq is still suffering. What do you think? I want some fruitful discussion. What is your opinion? What do Ayat. Sistani say about getting a system of Iran in Iraq? Ayatollah Sistani had the most followers in this World which he could use to unite Iraqi people atleast? Why he is not ready to become a wilayat-e-faqih of Iraq?
  22. (bismillah) (salam) Does anyone know if it is legal for an American citizen to adopt a child from Iran?
  23. The truth of wars in the world.
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