Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Misconceptions'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Main Forums
    • Ramadhan 1440/2019
    • Guest Forum
    • Theology and General Religion
    • Personalities in Islam
    • Prophets and Ahlul-Bayt
    • Jurisprudence/Laws
    • Politics/Current Events
    • Social/Family/Personal Issues
    • Science/Tech/Economics
    • Education/Careers
    • Medicine/Health/Fitness
    • Off-Topic
    • Poetry and Art
    • Polls
    • Shia/Sunni Dialogue
    • Christianity/Judaism Dialogue
    • Atheism/Philosophy/Others
    • Research into Other Sects
    • Arabic / العَرَبِية
    • Farsi / فارسی
    • Urdu / اُردُو‎
    • Other languages [French / français, Spanish / español, Chinese / 汉语, Hindi / हिन्दी, etc.. ]
    • North/Central/South America
    • Europe
    • Asia, Middle East, Africa
    • Australia and Others
    • Site Tech Support/Feedback
    • Site FAQs
  • The Hadith Club's Topics
  • Food Club's Topics
  • Sports Club's Topics
  • Reverts to Islam's Topics
  • Travel Club's Topics
  • Mental Health/Psych Club's Topics
  • Arts, Crafts, DIY Club's Topics
  • The Premier League Club's Topics
  • Quit Smoking's Topics

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Facebook


Website URL


Yahoo


Skype


Location


Religion


Mood


Favorite Subjects

Found 4 results

  1. https://historyofislam.com/contents/the-age-of-faith/muawiya/ I strongly Advise you read the above link. A Sunni' professor, describing Sunni perspective of the History of Muawiya. For those among my Shia brothers who believe their Sunni Brothers say RadiAllahu 'Anhu after Muawiyah, you can see that the Sunni's do not do that, at all. For those of you who want to see a Shia Acadamic, who is well known (and whom I saw lectures at UMAA this year), I refer you to Nabil Hussayn :http://scholar.princeton.edu/nhussen/links/term/400 and if you're lazy, here http://scholar.princeton.edu/nhussen/links/pro-alid-sunnis-المنزهون من اهل الحديث The above is a scholarly study on the Pro-'Ali Sunni scholars, that many of you may or may not know The reason I made this post is because I came across certain rhetoric over here making ill based sweeping generalizations that the MAJORITY of their Sunni brother's despise Ali and Revere Muawiyah so much so that they say RA after his name, The first step in Unity is to dispel ignorance and misconceptions from both sides. I've gone through great lengths with my Sunni' brothers to dispel and normalize their misconceptions of the Shia', now I feel I must do the same here. This: Modern Sunni literature Despite his endeavours in the expansion of the Caliphate and the establishment of the Umayyad Dynasty, the persona of Caliph Muawiyah I evokes a controversial figure in standard Islamic history whose legacy has never quite been able to shed the taint of his opposition to the Rashidun Caliph, Ali ibn Abi Talib. The late (Sunni) theologian Mawdudi (founder of Jamaat-E-Islami) wrote that the establishment of the caliphate as (essentially) a monarchy began with the caliphate of Muawiyah I. It wasn't the kind where Muawiyah was appointed by the Muslims. Mawdudi elaborated that Muawiyah wanted to be caliph and fought in order to attain the caliphate, not really depending upon the acceptance of the Muslim community. The people did not appoint Muawiyah as a caliph, he became one by force, and consequently the people had no choice but to give him their pledge of allegiance (baiah). Had the people not given Muawiyah their allegiance at that time, it wouldn't have meant so much as losing their rank or position, as much as it would have meant bloodshed and conflict. This certainly couldn't have been given preference over peace and order. Following Hasan ibn Ali's abdication of the caliphate, all the Muslims (including the Sahabah and Tabi'een) gave their pledge of allegiance to Muawiyah I, bringing an end to civil war. That year was called the Aam Al Jamaat (Year of Congregation). As Mawdudi pointed out, Muawiyah's own speech during the initial days of his caliphate expressed his own awareness of this:[146] By Allah, while taking charge of your government I was not unaware of the fact that you are unhappy over my taking over of government and you people don’t like it. I am well aware of whatever is there in your hearts regarding this matter but still I have taken it from you on the basis of my sword… Now if you see that I am not fulfilling your rights, then you should be happy with me with whatever is there The above taken from Wikipedia, with proper citations. Legacy Mu'awiyah greatly beautified Damascus and developed a court to rival that of the Byzantines. He expanded the frontiers of the empire, reaching the very gates of Constantinople at one point, though failing to hold any territory in Asia Minor. Throughout the Umayyad dynasty which he founded, its borders would be commensurate with those of the Islamic community (with the exception of the short-lived rival caliphate in Mecca, 680–692). No later caliphate would share the same borders as the whole ummah. Sunni Muslims credit him with saving the fledgling Muslim nation from post civil war anarchy, although many are critical of his controversial decision to designate his son as his successor, thereby converting the caliphate from an elective office to a monarchy. He nonetheless attempted to preserve the form of the election however, by causing his nobles and the chiefs of the empire to elect and swear allegiance to his son in his own lifetime, a tradition that endured for several succeeding dynasties. Later Sunnis decided that preservation of unity was more important than how the leader was chosen, and concentrated more in their writing on the caliphate on the qualities that were needed rather than on how he should be selected. Like Uthman, he tended to favor Arabs in general (and his own family in particular) over others. However, his administrative skills are widely acknowledged. It is said that friends and critics alike recognized his quality of hilm (civilized restraint). He shared this with his predecessors but not their humility and simple lifestyle. In contrast to their simple dress and table, he dressed and ate like a king. He began the transformation of Damascus, his capital, into a center of culture and learning. The Sunni view of Mu'awiyah Mu'awiya is not recognized as one of the four rightly guided caliphs. Most of the early Sunni historians saw his rule, and that of the Umayyad dynasty that followed him, as a descent into mere worldly rule (mulk), kingship rather than religious leadership. These historians were writing after the fall of the Umayyad dynasty to the Abbasids, and hence their writings reflect the Abbasid justifications for the Umayyad overthrow. Few later Sunni historians wholeheartedly defend Mu'awiyah. However, they do not dispute his right to rule. Sunni clerics and scholars have generally preached submission to authority, even when authority is less than perfect. Sunnis tend to view communal dissension with horror and accept flawed rule as preferable to civil war (fitnah). @ The above taken from http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Muawiyah @kirtc @Gaius I. Caesar @Abu-Jafar Herz @Tawheed313 @Sarah2016 @shiaman14
  2. (salam) Here is a video over the stereotypical things we all have been hearing about the Shia school. It is sad to see so much ignorance about Shia's and so much accusations. I would like to discuss these misconceptions with you my brothers, we will answer them together so we could benefit and remove the misconceptions. Anyone who can contribute with answers backed up with sources would be nice.
  3. i am originally from a sunni family however i am passionate and follow the beleifs of the shia sect, but when having discussions with my family we always argue as they beleive that the shia killed imam hussain a.s i know that is a total misconception but what strong evidence can i provide to them. we also argue over muawiyah as they dont beleive he was an enemy of islam however i know that is not trrue, i would really appreciate advice as im not sure what to do, and i get really worked up when i hear rumours about the followers of ahlulbayt a.s.
  4. As'Salaamu Alaikum, First of all, this if my first time posting on ShiaChat, so forgive me if I do/say something wrong. I'm actually a college student, and a student journalist. I also write for my school newspaper. This semester, I started a column sin which I address some of the misconceptions people have about Islam. Students email me questions/comments and I respond via my column. I'm finding that I often have the "correct" answer, but those commenting are not willing to accept it. They are not convinced. My question is for any revert who is willing to answer. It is not a big surprise that Islam is not seen well in the West. there are often misconceptions attatched to Islamic practicies that are further spread due to the ignorance of the media. When you first converted, I'm assuming you also knew about these misconceptions/stigmas. Can you explain what some of these misconceptions were and what you were told or what you read that made you think twice. I think it'll help me if I get an answer from someone who has been in the situation my readers are in to help me better explain my point to them. I would like to add that I'm not necessarily trying to convert them to Islam, but just to promote a better understanding of the religion. Thanks in advance
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...