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  1. Israeli jets launch air raids on southern Lebanon | Lebanon News | Al Jazeera
  2. Israel Says Two Rockets Launched from Lebanon, Fires Back After Strikes in Syria (msn.com)
  3. Alhumdulillah. Hezbollah is playing an extremely crucial role in helping lebanon in this financial crisis accompanied by impacts of sanctions. Anyone can add to the thread if there is anything relevant.
  4. Assalamu walaikum brother and sisters, I hope you are all in the best of health Insha’Allah. There is an online vigil for Lebanon taking place on zoom, hosted by shiekh Faiyaz Jaffer at 6PM EST today. Link: https://linktr.ee/icnyu
  5. Assalamu walaikum brothers and sisters. I’m sure everyone of us is extremely disturbed by what has just taken place in Lebanon. I feel helpless and I don’t just want to sit around. I don’t have the financial means to donate individually however I was thinking collectively we could set up a fundraiser to send to individuals (I know someone who can contact individual Lebanese people to help them, sister Berak Hussain to be exact). I’m just putting this out here so we can all discuss on how to help. Some ideas: I live in London so maybe everyone from London can help to organise something to help fundraise. And that everyone from each city can do the same. Or we can create an international fundraiser, collaboration... anything honestly any ideas are welcome I just really want to help. For now I know the only help that I have in my control is gaining more knowledge. Jazak’Allah everyone. May Allah bless all the Momineen and martyrs Insha’Allah.
  6. Assalam o Alaikum In the name of Allah most high. I have questions about, requirements for men entering howza. 1. What kind of requirements are there when it comes to your appearance like hair, clothes and style. 2. Should you as a man shave your head off before traveling to any hawza in Asia? 3. Should you grow beard?
  7. Allameh Sayyed Mohammed Ali Fazlollah passes away (+Photos) http://en.abna24.com/news//allameh-sayyed-Mohammed-Ali-fazlollah-passes-away-photos_956886.html July 1, 2019 - 9:54 PM News Code : 956886 Source : ABNA24Link: Allameh Sayyed Mohammed Ali Fazlollah, the brother of Ayatollah Sayyed Mohammed Hussain Fazlollah, one of Lebanese Shiite scholars and former member of Ahlul Bayt World Assembly passed away. The official site of Allameh Sayyed Mohammed Hussain Fazlollah announced the funeral and burial of the Grand Allameh. Allameh Fazlollah's funeral ceremony will held on Monday in the Majma al-Amin al-Hasanein in Haret Hreik in Lebanon. The body of Allamah Fazlollah will be buried in Bint Jbeil at 8:00 AM on Tuesday.
  8. How accurate is the following statement by the Government of Canada 'Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness' regarding Hizbullah??? Please help, thanks. https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/ntnl-scrt/cntr-trrrsm/lstd-ntts/crrnt-lstd-ntts-en.aspx#30 Hizballah Also known as Hizbullah, Hizbollah, Hezbollah, Hezballah, Hizbullah, The Party of God, Islamic Jihad (Islamic Holy War), Islamic Jihad Organization, Islamic Resistance, Islamic Jihad for the Liberation of Palestine, Ansar al-Allah (Followers of God/Partisans of God/God's Helpers), Ansarollah (Followers of God/Partisans of God/God's Helpers), Ansar Allah (Followers of God/Partisans of God/God's Helpers), Al-Muqawamah al-Islamiyyah (Islamic Resistance), Organization of the Oppressed, Organization of the Oppressed on Earth, Revolutionary Justice Organization, Organization of Right Against Wrong and Followers of the Prophet Muhammed. Description One of the most technically capable terrorist groups in the world, Hizballah is a radical Shia group ideologically inspired by the Iranian revolution. Its goals are the liberation of Jerusalem, the destruction of Israel, and, ultimately, the establishment of a revolutionary Shia Islamic state in Lebanon, modelled after Iran. Formed in 1982 in response to Israel's invasion of Lebanon, Hizballah carried out some of the most infamous terror attacks of the Lebanese civil war, such as the suicide bombings of the barracks of United States Marines and French paratroopers in Beirut, as well as the hijacking of TWA Flight 847. While all other Lebanese militias disarmed at the end of Lebanon's civil war in 1990, Hizballah continued to fight, waging a guerilla war against Israeli troops stationed in southern Lebanon. Following Israel's withdrawal from Lebanon in 2000, Hizballah attacks against Israeli forces continued, concentrated on the disputed Shebaa Farms area. In 2006, Hizballah provoked Israel's invasion of Lebanon by kidnapping two Israeli soldiers and killing 8 others. On January 3, 2018, Hizballah Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah announced that the group was working "to obtain all kinds of weapons that would enable it to achieve victory in the next war." Date listed 2002-12-10 Date reviewed 2018-11-21 EDIT: Also, any thoughts or feelings on Canada's statement?
  9. As we are approaching the 70th anniversary of the #Nakbah, a brief history lesson for the Shi'i community. Please read and share! https://ahlulbaytblog.com/2018/05/10/the-nakbah-israels-extermination-of-indigenous-palestinian-shiism/
  10. In 2012 WIN-Gallup International conducted a global survey of religiosity and atheism, which they broke down by country. In Lebanon, their findings suggest (aggregate information on page 15) that only 64% of Lebanese people are religious (meaning they identify as Sunni, Shia, or Christian and actively believe in god), while 33% are not religious, with an additional 2% as strict atheists. While non-religious people do not break the 50% mark, this number is not that far off from my original estimation. In other words, secularism in Lebanon as a whole is pretty much exactly what I discovered while living in Hamra. This phenomenon as pertaining to Muslims is called cultural Muslims. This is very similar to cultural Jews, who identify as Jewish but do not believe in god, and cultural Christians, who identify as Christian but do not believe in god. This is a fairly common phenomenon. Interestingly, Lebanon almost perfectly mimics the United States in this regard. In the same poll (see page 16) the US is only 60% religious, 30% irreligious, and 5% atheist. In real life, however, Lebanon does a better job keeping religion separate from policy. Source: https://atheistpapers.com/2015/10/03/atheism-and-non-religion-in-lebanon-more-common-than-thought/
  11. Important place in geopolitics... wanted to know who has the most clout among the Lebanese and what the future holds for this small but fiery country i want actual answers not trolling/flexing
  12. Salam W Alaykum I am in a very confusing situation right now.. I have been stressing too much about it. I am originally a Shia Lebanese and live abroad with my family and have been doing it ever since I was kid. I always had in mind that I would marry a Lebanese girl since Lebanese suffer of extreme nationalism. For the past 3 months I have been dating an Iraqi girl who I adore and admire. I enjoy every second with her. When we first started talking she told me that her father is Sunni and her mother is Shia but she has very little knowledge of both, so she told me doesn't count herself as either. When we would go out, we would kiss (I know, haram) but I kissed her and then told her that what we are doing is wrong and we should do Mut'a (she was married before and I asked a Sheikh about it and he told me it is permissible). She was reacted in a negative way and didn't like the idea because in her point of view, kissing and such are not haram because we live in a different era etc. But I explained to her that that is not the way I see it and so on. After about 1.5 month I managed to convince her to do Mut'a and we are both happy. My goal with this girl is to marry her but right now she tells me she is more into Sunni because of her father (he is not even living with her) and her view on Shia is bit weird because she has only a couple of friends of Shia and they were bad people and her mother didn't teach her a lot. Right now, we are in a critical situation where I told her that if I want to marry her, I am expecting her to pray, eat halal food only and fast and I would prefer if she would be Shia and I told her that I could prove to her why Shia is wrong using Sunni and Shia hadith. But she is very upset and I know her point of view on religion is a little bit European since she grew up here. But I am willing to sacrifice a lot to change her mind and we are almost on the edge of breakup because of this. Please what are your views on this ? I am really stressing about this and in my opinion, if she is Sunni but loves Ahlul Bayt I would not have a lot of problems with it but I would still worry about my children since I prefer them to be Shia.. Please, ANY ADVICE/OPINIONS WOULD BE EXTREMELY APPRECIATED. AC
  13. DNA Research Shows Canaanites Were Not Wiped Out By Israelites BY DANIELA COBOS ON 07/28/17 AT 4:51 PM A study published Thursday found that the ancient Canaanites were not destroyed by the Israelites as the Bible says, but rather that they went on to become modern-day Lebanese. In a study conducted by the American Journal of Human Genetics, UK’s Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sent researchers to extract DNA from remains of five people found in the former Canaanite city state of Sidon, a coastal city in Lebanon. The remains were estimated to be 3,700 years old. The ancient Canaanites lived in the cities Sodom and Gomorrah, which were reportedly destroyed by God, according to the Book of Genesis. The Old Testament Book of Deuteronomy said God told the Israelites to wipe out the Canaanites. “Do not leave alive anything that breathes. Completely destroy them otherwise they will teach you to follow all the detestable things they do in worshipping their gods, and you will sin against the Lord your God,” he said to the Israelites. Despite this passage, other parts of the Bible contradicted the idea that the Israelites exterminated all of the Canaanites, suggesting there may have been survivors. Researchers examined the entire genome of the nearly 4,000-year-old remains and compared it to the DNA of 99 modern Lebanese people. They determined that more than 90 percent of modern-day Lebanese ancestry could be traced back to the Canaanites. “The Bible reports the destruction of the Canaanite cities and the annihilation of its people; if true, the Canaanites could not have directly contributed genetically to present-day populations,” the study read. “However, no archaeological evidence has so far been found to support widespread destruction of Canaanite cities between the Bronze and Iron Ages. We show that present-day Lebanese derive most of their ancestry from a Canaanite-related population, which therefore implies substantial genetic continuity in the Levant since at least the Bronze Age.” Dr. Marc Haber, one of the researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, said it was a “pleasant surprise” to analyze 3,700-year-old DNA found in a hot environment. “The present-day Lebanese are likely to be direct descendants of the Canaanites, but they have in addition a small proportion of Eurasian ancestry that may have arrived via conquests by distant populations such as the Assyrians, Persians, or Macedonians,” he said. The Canaanites are credited with introducing what is believed to be the first alphabet during the Bronze Age. http://www.ibtimes.com/dna-research-shows-canaanites-were-not-wiped-out-israelites-2571963
  14. This video was posted by Khamenei.ir website and I decided to share it with you good friends of mine.
  15. Male prostitution on the rise in Lebanon World's oldest profession the only option in Beirut for some refugee and undocumented migrant men. Destitute and desperate in Lebanon, some men are turning to prostitution [Paul du Verdie/Transterra Media] by Paul Du Verdie Beirut, Lebanon - In an economically troubled, conservative country where homosexual behaviour is taboo, a growing number of men are prostituting themselves to scrape together a living. When talking about his life "Hassan" hesitates, the words coming out with difficulty as he chain-smokes cigarettes and fiddles with his sweatshirt. His work could have him arrested, beaten up and jailed. Hassan, a 27-year-old Sunni from Iraq, is a male prostitute and has been selling himself for money in Beirut for a year. This was not a lifestyle that he ever wanted, but something he says was forced upon him. He insists he would have chosen another path "had I been given the choice". Hassan - who asked his real name not be used - was forced to leave his country after his family found out about his homosexuality and threatened to kill him. Fearful for his life, he fled Iraq and was smuggled into Lebanon, along with five other refugees, by an NGO he refuses to name. After a few months, he was evicted from his flat after getting involved in a fight. Alone, still unemployed and desperate for any way to make money, he heard about bars in bourgeois areas of Beirut where men would pay high prices to spend a few hours with young men like him. A couple of days later, a wealthy entrepreneur from Turkey picked him up at a gay club located in the heart of the capital. After a drink and a short discussion about prices, they left together. The next morning Hassan was given $400 from the first of what would become many "clients". He was now a male escort. 'Temporary situation' His is not an isolated story. "Fouad", a 20-year-old Christian student who fled from Syria to avoid being forced into the army last summer, now works in a hammam, or men's bath-house, near a tourist area of Hamra in west Beirut. Fouad, who also requested anonymity, gives "special" massages to any customer who asks. All of his co-workers are Syrian as well and offer the same kind of services. Instead of being paid by the owner of the hammam, they "rent" their position there for a fee, then arrange rates directly with the clients. It's a temporary situation. As soon as I have saved enough money, I will go back to Syria to finish my studies. - male prostitute in Beirut Like Hassan, Fouad says there was nowhere else to turn but to a life of prostitution. "It's a temporary situation," Fouad says. "As soon as I have saved enough money, I will go back to Syria to finish my studies." It is difficult to be sure whether he believes in what he says, given the ongoing civil war in his country, but like several of his coworkers, Fouad is eager to return to a normal life. In the meantime, he and the other sex workers wait, bare-chested with white towels tied around their waists, standing against a fake stone wall next to the entrance, hoping for - and fearing - a busy night. They are all young and healthy-looking. Some even joke and laugh, while others do not talk at all and never make eye contact with potential clients smoking shisha in the lobby. Easier than ever According to several NGOs working with male escorts, thousands of men such as Hassan and Fouad have turned to prostitution in Beirut, offering everything from sexual favours to simple company to their clients. Clients tend to be wealthy middle-aged men from Lebanon, Turkey, the Gulf states and as far away as North Africa. Some became escorts after arriving from a country torn apart by war, having nowhere to turn; others found themselves with bills to pay and children to feed with no chance of employment. The fact that one can anonymously use gay social networks such as Grindr or Manjam to meet clients in a matter of minutes - or look for potential ones in Beirut's gay bars, clubs or hammams - makes it easier for these male prostitutes to stay safe and to keep their job a secret. Despite homosexual activity being illegal in Lebanon, Beirut is widely regarded as the safest place for homosexuals in the Middle East. Police rarely raid the hammams and nightclubs - since their owners pay good money to avoid crack downs. The world-famous Lebanese band Mashrou Leila has an openly gay singer. And the younger generations tend to be more much more open-minded about sexual preferences than the older ones. This perceived safe haven is well known in the region, and has since made Beirut the go-to destination for Middle Eastern tourists wanting to express their sexuality more freely. Before the violence and instability in Lebanon turned them away, wealthy gay men from the Gulf countries were especially prominent, ready to pay up to a few thousand dollars - in cash, jewellery or designer clothes - for a night with an escort. But such high prices are by no means the norm. Most clients are understood to pay about $200 for a Lebanese escort. Syrian men reportedly tend to cost less, only $50 on average. But even at this low price, many Syrian refugees in Lebanon choose this option, given the alternative: desperate searching for terribly paid jobs. Syrian war's effect "There have always been male sex workers in Lebanon. It was common knowledge," says an outreach programme coordinator with Helem, a Lebanese LGBT-rights NGO. "But since the US invasion of Iraq, and even more so with the Syrian civil war, there are more of them than ever before." That is because many of the 1.2 million Syrian refugees in Lebanon have a difficult time finding jobs, and end up severely struggling to provide food and shelter for themselves and their families. In 2012, a study by the RAND Corporation showed among Lebanese and Syrian sex workers, about 40 percent and 68 percent, respectively, defined themselves as heterosexual. Since the Geneva II peace conference is showing little progress and the Syrian war rages on, poverty-stricken Syrians in Beirut have little chance to see their future improve any time soon. With many tourists avoiding Lebanon because of political unrest, the escorts may soon find themselves running short of clients. Hassan does not know what will happen then. "When I left my country and struggled to eat, I thought it could not get worse. When I started at the hammam, I was certain it could not get worse. Now, I do not know what to expect." A version of this story was originally published by Transterra Media. Source: Al Jazeera
  16. Hello guys, I'm an 18 year old Lebanese guy living in the USA. I'm probably the most religious and smartest one in the family. I'm not saying I wanna get married now but I would like to get married like 2 years before I finish college (around 21-22). My mom keeps saying no, I have to finish college first and start a career job. I think I can work a decent job while I finish my studies and get married. I feel like all Lebanese parents are like that. Anyone else deal with the same? Thoughts?
  17. For instance, there are Lebanese that openly call themselves Muslim but they will drink, fail to pray, and wear short sleeves. Where as other Arabs like Iraqis and Gulf Arabs have the Janbiya(Bedouin headgear) and various other cultural attitudes and beliefs that facilitate in this case a closer association to Islam in comparison many Lebanese have abandoned the hijab and adopted feminist and liberal oriented lifestyle i.e. liberation from religion as opposed to following it. A close friend of mine told me that Lebanese were embarrassed to call themselves Arab with one person going as far to only eat French food to associate with another culture. I went through a quick search of each region and found these photos in the first search results: Lebanese: Iraqi: Gulf Arabs: Jordanian: Egyptian: Palestinian: Syrian: North African Arabs:
  18. To Whom This May Concern, My name is Hassan Mohaidly and i'm a young Lebanese-Canadian Entrepreneur. I have an important question in regards to which MARJA can I follow While growing up, my father followed Fadlullah and my mother followed Sistani. Growing up I never knew which MARJA should I follow. Now I'm grown up and I want to make a choice to which Marja to follow. And to be honest I don't want to follow someone just because somebody told me to follow him. So my QUESTION is since Fadullah passed away (PBUH) couldn't I follow his son? Also what are some of Fadullah's main teachings and philosophy compared to the other marjas? I'm an indivdiual that loves business and personal development, so is Fadullah's teaching the same thing? ThankYou
  19. As salam alaykoum wa rahmatoulahi wa barakatuh, I am a shia convert who lives in Montreal (Quebec, Canada), but I do not go to mosque, if I had to I would probably go to CCMM. I follow Ayatullah Fadlallah, and my husband's family is from Lebanon. CCMM's website doesn't update regularly (if at all) so I am never sure of exactly what date is today, and this is very frustrating when trying to say my duas on the right nights/days, ramadan, ashura, etc... Where (website), if it exists, could I find an updated (updates regularly throughout the year) hijri calendar? JazakAllah khairan!
  20. Does he even have any info and is it going to help? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4BTWZ1uJRI The son of Libya’s late leader Muammar Qaddafi has been kidnapped in Lebanon by militants demanding information about the fate of a Shiite cleric who went missing in Libya decades ago. Hannibal Qaddafi appeared in a video aired late Friday on local Al-Jadeed TV saying anyone who has information about Imam Moussa al-Sadr should come forward. Qaddafi appeared to have been beaten up and had black eyes but said in the video he is “in good health, happy and relaxed.” It was not clear when Qaddafi, who is married to a Lebanese woman, was kidnapped. Al-Sadr, one of Lebanon’s most prominent Shiite clerics in the 20th century, vanished, along with two other people, during a trip to Tripoli in 1978. Lebanon blamed the disappearance on Muammar Qaddafi. Alarabiya
  21. Hello there guys. I've recently tried to start vlogging again and the first video in a series about Hezbollah's relationship with Iran is online. The video posted is a short overview. Here's a brief description: Where does Lebanon's Hezbollah come from? What are the grievances that contributed to its establishment? A short introduction to how it all got started, in English. In August of 1994, then-State Department Coordinator for Counterterrorism Barbara Bodine referred to Hezbollah as an Iranian creation. Despite the political color of her statement and of those preceding and succeeding her, the theory that Hezbollah is a foreign-imposed construct in Lebanon has also remained afloat in more serious discussions and literature. This short introduction corrects that view, arguing that Hezbollah is an organic and natural evolution within Lebanon. An evolution that gradually took place within the Shiite community following the end of the Great War.
  22. AOA. Does any body have a soft copy or link of the book, "Lebanon" written by Dr Mostafa Chamran Shaheed in Urdu or English? Thank you.
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