Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Arab'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Religion Forums
    • General Islamic Discussion
    • Shia/Sunni Dialogue
    • Christianity/Judaism Dialogue
    • Atheism/Other Religions
    • Minor Islamic Sects
    • Jurisprudence/Laws
  • Other Forums
    • Politics/Current Events
    • Social/Family/Personal
    • Science/Health/Economics
    • Education/Careers
    • Travel/Local Community
    • Off-Topic
    • Poetry and Art
  • Language Specific
    • Arabic / العَرَبِية
    • Farsi / فارسی
    • Urdu / اُردُو‎
    • Other languages [French / français, Spanish / español, Chinese / 汉语, Hindi / हिन्दी, etc.. ]
  • Site Support
    • Site Support/Feedback
    • Site FAQs
  • The Hadith Club's Topics
  • Food Club's Topics
  • Sports Club's Topics
  • Reverts to Islam's Topics
  • Travel Club's Topics
  • Mental Health/Psych Club's Topics
  • Arts, Crafts, DIY Club's Topics
  • The Premier League Club's Topics
  • Quit Smoking's Topics

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Facebook


Website URL


Yahoo


Skype


Location


Religion


Mood


Favorite Subjects

Found 16 results

  1. What is it with us arabs and حسد? (Envy) I know it's not just arabs but I've noticed that it's extremely strong with us and often behind our backs. For example, in Scandinavia and Europe, if there is something to be said, they say it. With us, they give us evil eye and say stuff like "Look at him/her, already has a (x) and is only (y)" My grandfather (not the best human), may Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) guide him, saw my car and I immediately saw the Ghira. A couple days later, the baggage wouldnt open. A couple more weeks later, the car started breaking down and the car hasn't been the same since. I have an Aqeeq ring I always keep on me. All of the family sat and we were discussing various topics until we started talking about my job and other things. 2 minutes in, and the stone fell right out of the ring Immediate silence. I've never seen someones face so red before. Just thought I'd make this post and see if there is something we can discuss about this topic and why this problem occurs. I'm sure many others have experienced Evil Eye, Envy, Ghira and other things.
  2. Assalamailakium brothers and sisters. I wanted to ask a question regarding a restaurant. There is a restaurant near my area that is owned by Arab Christians, but the meat, according to them, is Zabihah Halal. My marja is Ayatollah Sistani, and I know that according to him, one can eat the food of an Ahle Kitab, but my question is how about if the halal meat is handled by Ahle Kitab. The restaurant in question even has two halal signs, one in Arabic and one in english. Is it haram to eat their or not?
  3. Salam Aleykum, I am a 23 year old girl who live in the UK. I graduated university this year and among other things met a man that I can finally see as my future husband, I am completely and utterly in love with him because he was able to put a smile on my face in a period nobody else could. For my studies I relocated to London alone as a result I stayed here for nearly five years away from my family, meeting occasionally a few times a year. Alhamdullah I am successful in my career and was successful in my studies and I am from a sort of open-minded family hence, the did not mind me staying here to see my future although I am alone and I do feel very lonely at times but they have never pressured me for marriage and I was not ready. However, this has now changed and I am most certain about the guy I have met, he is Shia Muslim from a good family treats me like I deserve but the only issue would be that he is not Arab, like myself. I am from Iraq and he is from Pakistan and this is the only difference between me and him. I tried to speak to my mum over the phone just telling her that I am in love and want to get married, she told me off immediately and basically in very simple words told me that SHE will NEVER approve no matter what and that if I desperately wanted to go ahead with the marriage I am more than welcome to but she did not want anything to do with me past that. Now he reasons my mum is furious is that I brought a guy from a completely different country meaning he has different cultures and traditions but also most importantly he will have a MAJOR language barrier with my family as there is NO language in common whatsoever. But to me this isn't an issue body language and eye contact can say more than verbal words. I want my parents approval please advice me, help me, I do not want to get married without their consent. How can I convince my father who has never missed a prayer or a day of fasting that rejecting this man because he is not arab is so haram. How can I convince him. If you have had similiar experience please advice.
  4. Pakistan army being a battle trained army, only Muslim nuclear power state and became a independent nation on an ideology of Islam. I am a firm believer, soliders of Pakistan army will be part of Imam e Zamana (A.S) army. But Pak army in past and uptill now always inclined towards America and Saudi kings. In this week more Pak army troops were sent to protect Saudi kings. Surely it seems as Pak army is supporter of Saudi idelogy which is far away from idelogy of Ahlul bayth (A.S). How do you guys take these moves of Pakistan army? These moves are so conflicting, at one end they are trying to come close to Iran by fighting against terrorism created by Middel eastren country in Pakistan but on the other hand they are protecting their kingdom. How do you evaluate all these situation? Do you think Pak army is helper or enemy of Imam (A.S).
  5. As we all know the internet is witnessing a second massive wave of anti islams and anti muslims. Along with them are some nationalist atheist iranians that have been getting alot of attention. They live in the west that are claiming that their country had been attacked by barbarian arabs and that iran has gone backwards ever since. I just wanted to know what normal muslim iranians thought of the arab conquest by Omar (RA)
  6. Salam Brothers and Sisters. I have heard from some non Arabs that within Arab culture, polygamy is generally more accepted. I would like some Arabs to confirm or deny this based on whether in their experience it is true or false. So, is Polygamy a common practice? Are the women fine with it? Do the women show signs of distress and worry when thinking of their husbands being with another man? In my opinion, all women are the same and no woman would want to be without their husband a single night unless that husband is just not nice to her. In this discussion I am only concerned about wives with loving and loved husbands, I know many women, if they hate their husbands, would push them away to be rid of them by letting them get marry again happily. Also I have discussed this topic academically with my wife, and I have learned that wives may be disgusted by thinking about their husband being with other women sexually, is this true or are some women not concerned whether another woman has been "there". Married people's advice is preferred and please! No Arabs giving their view about how Arabs are unless they have Arab in laws. [MOD NOTE: Your topic asking for polygamous Arabs to talk about their sex life is not appropriate and not approved.]
  7. I'm a Sunni, I don't know much about Shia, I just want to know, if we both Sunni and Shia are following same God Allah, and Same Prophet Rasoolallah SAW and same religion Islam, why are we fighting in every aspect ? Killing each other in Yemen, Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, etc. Can't we unite under one banner ISLAM, and can't we fight our common Zionist enemy? And why Shias are disrespecting some of the companions of Prophet Muhammad SAW ?
  8. Aslaam-o-Alaikum I have been waiting for the release of 'Mohammad', a 2015 movie made in Iran which I believe has now hit cinemas in Iran since the end of August. I was wandering if the movie will be released here in the UK and when? Any info would be appreciated! If the release is not destined for the UK, if there any info as to how the film can be acquired? Thanks in adv. Saas
  9. http://imhussain.com/e_index.php?ac=news&id=32 Harvard School of Public Health states that consuming fast food increases your risk of obesity-related conditions. Giving up fast food seems intimidating, as you can sacrifice both convenience and indulgence; however, eating healthful alternatives will improve your health, and eventually, your cravings for fast food will diminish. Breakfast fast-food breakfasts such as breakfast burritos, sausage and cheese sandwiches, syrup-soaked pancakes and oily waffles aren-t the way to start your day. Alternatives such as lettuce wraps, tofu scrambles, egg and toast and oatmeal pancakes are healthier choices to give your body energy and nutrition. Compare the 450 calories and 31 grams of fat in a fast-food biscuit with egg and bacon to the 130 calories and 5 grams of fat in a scramble with four egg whites and 1 ounce of cooked turkey bacon. Time’s often an issue for breakfast, but you can prepare many alternative breakfasts in advance and heat them during a busy morning. For example, make a batch of breakfast burritos from black beans, egg whites, chopped bell peppers and corn tortillas and freeze them individually wrapped. Alternately, have a smoothie made from fresh fruit, a sliced apple with peanut butter or strawberries with almond butter for an energy boost. Lunch fast-food lunches like cheeseburgers, french fries or fish and chips can cause fatigue rather than giving you energy. Alternatives such as baked sweet potato fries, tuna salad or a stuffed pita are much healthier. A fast-food double burger has more than 942 calories and 58 grams of fat; to compare, a 3-ounce turkey burger on a whole-wheat pita has 169 calories and 2 grams of fat. While it’s undeniably less indulgent, it’s far better for your health. Other lunch options include a butterhead lettuce and tomato salad with balsamic vinegar, tomato soup, steamed fish with spinach or a chicken breast lettuce wrap with avocado. If you need lunch to-go, bring it in an insulated lunch box with ice packs to keep your food cold or a thermos to keep soup warm. Dinner Fast-food dinners are not an ideal way to end your day. Instead of greasy pizza, create a homemade Margherita pizza, swap fried chicken for oven-baked chicken and have a salad with whole-grain bread instead of a deli sandwich. Other choices for dinner include homemade soup, vegetable stir-fry, steamed lean meat or whole-wheat pasta. Replacing two pieces of fast-food fried chicken, which has more than 431 calories and 26 grams of fat, with 3 ounces of chicken breast for less than 100 calories and around 2 grams of fat instantly makes dinner healthier. If you need dinner quickly, prepare a large batch of soup, salad or sandwich filling at the beginning of the week or use a slow cooker to prepare lean meats and stews while you’re away for the day. Snacks and Desserts Chips, french fries, popcorn chicken, pie, ice cream shakes and other unhealthy snacks and desserts do not nourish your body. Fresh fruit is an ideal replacement; it doubles as both a delicious snack and healthful dessert, and there’s multiple types from which to choose. Smoothies are excellent replacements for fast-food shakes. To compare, a large strawberry shake has more than 550 calories and 13 grams of fat; replace it with a smoothie made from 1 cup of plain, fat-free yogurt and 1 cup of fresh strawberries for 186 calories and 1 gram of fat. Fruit salads, fruit pudding made with silken tofu and fruit dipped in chocolate are other tasty dessert choices. For savory snacks, vegetables sticks, whole-grain crackers or roasted chickpeas are tasty choices. Source: healthyeating.sfgate.com Note: We are the International Media Unit in the holy shrine of Imam Hussain. Our main aim is to spread the message of Ahlul-Bayt worldwide. Please join our Facebook group at (Hussein Revivalism) and follow our Twitter account @ImamHusainMedia and Instagram @imamhussainmedia Thank you, may Allah and the Ahlul-Bayt bless you.
  10. A Lebanese family donated an artifact to the Museum of the holy shrine of Imam Hussain dating back to the Phoenician Age. Lebanese experts confirmed that the artifact dated back to five thousand years ago, during the time of the Phoenicians. The relic (40cm long and 20cm wide) is carved in the form of a ship, symbolizing that Hussein is the -Rescue Ship- as reported by Prophet Muhammad and hence the idea of the gift to the Museum of Imam Hussain. Sayyid Dhyai al-Deen, the Director of the Museum, said -Since the opening of the Museum of Imam Hussain, numerous artifacts were gifted from Ahl al-Bayt lovers.- It is mentioned that the museum celebrated with the family who gifted the artifact from the Republic of Lebanon that was provided by Dr. Kaplan Kaplan, Chairman of the Council of the South, responsible for building the infrastructure in southern Lebanon. http://imhussain.com/e_index.php?ac=news&id=37 Note: We are the International Media Unit in the holy shrine of Imam Hussain, Karbala Iraq. Our main aim is to spread the message of Ahlul-Bayt worldwide. Please join our Facebook Group at Hussein Revivalism Follow our Twitter account @ImamHusainMedia Instagram @imamhussainmedia Thank you, may Allah and the Ahlul-Bayt bless you.
  11. (salam) This is an very old article, but interested to share on this day :) http://english.tebyan.net/newindex.aspx?pid=25787
  12. Our dear old Fiskie with is withering salvo on Arabs for their rampant, and criminal, racism. ********* How many tracts, books, documentaries, speeches and doctoral theses have been written and produced about Islamophobia? How many denunciations have been made against the Sarkozys and the Le Pens and the Wilders for their anti-immigration (for which, read largely anti-Muslim) policies or – let us go down far darker paths – against the plague of Breivik-style racism? The problem with all this is that Muslim societies – or shall we whittle this down to Middle Eastern societies? – are allowed to appear squeaky-clean in the face of such trash, and innocent of any racism themselves. A health warning, therefore, to all Arab readers of this column: you may not like this week's rant from yours truly. Because I fear very much that the video of Alem Dechasa's recent torment in Beirut is all too typical of the treatment meted out to foreign domestic workers across the Arab world (there are 200,000 in Lebanon alone). Many hundreds of thousands have now seen the footage of 33-year-old Ms Dechasa being abused and humiliated and pushed into a taxi by Ali Mahfouz, the Lebanese agent who brought her to Lebanon as a domestic worker. Ms Dechasa was transported to hospital where she was placed in the psychiatric wing and where, on 14 March, she hanged herself. She was a mother of two and could not stand the thought of being deported back to her native Ethiopia. That may not have been the only reason for her mental agony. Lebanese women protested in the centre of Beirut, the UN protested, everyone protested. Ali Mahfouz has been formally accused of contributing to her death. But that's it. The Syrian revolt, the Bahraini revolution, the Arab Awakening, have simply washed Alem Dechasa's tragedy out of the news. How many readers know – for example – that not long before Ms Dechasa's death, a Bengali domestic worker was raped by a policeman guarding her at a courthouse in the south Lebanese town of Nabatieh, after she had been caught fleeing an allegedly abusive employer? As the Lebanese journalist Anne-Marie El-Hage has eloquently written, Ms Dechasa belonged to "those who submit in silence to the injustice of a Lebanese system that ignores their human rights, a system which literally closes its eyes to conditions of hiring and work often close to slavery". All too true. How well I recall the Sri Lankan girl who turned up in Commodore Street at the height of the Israeli siege and shelling of West Beirut in 1982, pleading for help and protection. Like tens of thousands of other domestic workers from the sub-continent, her passport had been taken from her the moment she began her work as a domestic "slave" in the city; and her employers had then fled abroad to safety – taking the girl's passport with them so she could not leave herself. She was rescued by a hotel proprietor when he discovered that local taxi drivers were offering her a "bed" in their vehicles in return for sex. Everyone who lives in Lebanon or Jordan or Egypt or Syria, for that matter, or – especially – the Gulf, is well aware of this outrage, albeit cloaked in a pious silence by the politicians and prelates and businessmen of these societies. In Cairo, I once remarked to the Egyptian hosts at a dinner on the awful scars on the face of the young woman serving food to us. I was ostracised for the rest of the meal and – thankfully – never invited again. Arab societies are dependent on servants. Twenty-five per cent of Lebanese families have a live-in migrant worker, according to Professor Ray Jureidini of the Lebanese American University in Beirut. They are essential not only for the social lives of their employers (housework and caring for children) but for the broader Lebanese economy. Yet in the Arab Gulf, the treatment of migrant labour – male as well as female – has long been a scandal. Men from the subcontinent often live eight to a room in slums – even in the billionaires' paradise of Kuwait – and are consistently harassed, treated as third-class citizens, and arrested on the meanest of charges. Saudi Arabia long ago fell into the habit of chopping off the heads of migrant workers who were accused of assault or murder or drug-running, after trials that bore no relation to international justice. In 1993, for example, a Christian Filipino woman accused of killing her employer and his family was dragged into a public square in Dammam and forced to kneel on the ground where her executioner pulled her scarf from her head before decapitating her with a sword. Then there was 19-year old Sithi Farouq, a Sri Lankan housemaid accused of killing her employer's four-year-old daughter in 1994. She claimed her employer's aunt had accidentally killed the girl. On 13 April, 1995, she was led from her prison cell in the United Arab Emirates to stand in a courtyard in a white abaya gown, crying uncontrollably, before a nine-man firing squad which shot her down. It was her 20th birthday. God's mercy, enshrined in the first words of the Koran, could not be extended to her, it seems, in her hour of need. Weblink
  13. Okay, I understand we are all very proud of our heritage, but this is just hypothetical and for fun not to promate racism or prejudice of any sort...... If you could become any other race or ethnicity other than the one you already are, what would you be? Personally I would like to be Asian for a day.(Chinese, Mongol...) Those guys are frickn ninjas!!!!! And they are so smart and cool.(not saying everyone else isnt cool, but Asian cool is a different kind of cool)
  14. This is an interesting video i came across from Baba Ali: "One thing i always find funny is how people take so much pride in things such as race and color. But what did we do to be proud of it? You can "oh I was born in this country!!!!" , but why do think you deserve credit for that... others say "I was born into this family"... but what did you do to be proud of those achievements of your culture or ethnicity? The truth is you didnt have a choice over any of those things, it just happened. You did nothing to gain your race, your family, or the color of your skin. Isn't it very stupid to have so much pride in something you have no choice over. So why are people so much attached to those factors to the point where they put it before Islam?" Quran-49:13 "oh mandkind, we have created you from a male and female,and made you into nations and tribes, that you may know one another..." we have people that claim to be Muslims, but instead follow their cultures and claim they are following Islam, but are really just following their own culture. This is one of the reasons for the sad state of the Ummah today" This attachment to our cultur over Islam is what divides the world today. It has come to the point where we hate eachother. I mean, we always blame westerners for being racist, but we ignore the fact that we are the most racist people of all. I hate to point it out, but middle easterners, Pakistanis, and Persians are the worst offenders. They constantly talk about how they are superior. I mean, how often have you heard Persians calling themselves "pure Aryans" and claiming their ancestors were "blond haired, blue eyed nordic", saying how much they hate Afghans and Arabs. Or Arabs saying they are pure Semetic and talking about "impure African/Asiastic blood" and Pakistanis saying they are 100% non- Indian. Though your culture may have made great advancements and achievements in the past, what have you done to claim their achoievements as your own, other than being born into the same race? How much will your culture or how much you did to support it help you on the day of judgement?
  15. U.S.: Shia Face Systematic and Pervasive Discrimination in Saudi Arabia Shia face systematic and pervasive official and legal discrimination, including in education, employment, the military, housing, political representation, the judiciary, religious practice, and media. Primary reasons include the widely-held view that Shia are polytheists and that they commit apostasy by practicing some of their worship activities, historical Sunni-Shia animosity, and suspicion of Iranian influence on their actions. (Ahlul Bayt News Agency) - US secretary of state Hillary Clinton expressed deep concern about the Saudi government which denies its people the most fundamental human rights : the right to believe according to their own conscience – including the freedom to not believe or not follow the religion favored by its ; the right to practice their religion freely, without risking discrimination, arrest, or violence; and the right to educate their children in their own religious traditions; and the freedom to express their beliefs. The Saudi government did not respect religious freedom in law, but generally permitted Shi'a religious gatherings and non-Muslim private religious practices. Muslims who did not adhere to the government's interpretation of Islam faced significant political, economic, legal, social, and religious discrimination, including limited employment and educational opportunities, underrepresentation in official institutions, restrictions on religious practice, and restrictions on places of worship and community centers. In Saudi Arabia , authorities continue to repress Shi'a Muslims, Sulaimaniya Isma'ilis , and others who do not share the government’s religious views. Now, as you know, the protection of religious freedom is a fundamental concern of the United States going back to the earliest days of our republic, and it remains so today. U.S. Department of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor July-December, 2010 International Religious Freedom Report September 13, 2011 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saudi Arabia The laws and policies restrict religious freedom, and in practice, the government generally enforced these restrictions. Freedom of religion is neither recognized nor protected under the law and is severely restricted in practice. The country is an Islamic state governed by a monarchy; the king is head of both state and government. According to the basic law, Sunni Islam is the official religion and the country's constitution is the Qur'an and the Sunna (traditions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad). The legal system is based on the government's application of the Hanbali School of Sunni Islamic jurisprudence. The public practice of any religion other than Islam is prohibited, and there is no separation between state and religion. The government did not respect religious freedom in law, but generally permitted Shia religious gatherings and non-Muslim private religious practices. Some Muslims who did not adhere to the government's interpretation of Islam faced significant political, economic, legal, social, and religious discrimination, including limited employment and educational opportunities, underrepresentation in official institutions, restrictions on religious practice, and restrictions on places of worship and community centers. ..... Although many intolerant statements had been removed, some school textbooks continued to contain overtly intolerant statements against Jews and Christians and intolerant references by allusion against Shia and Sufi Muslims and other religious groups. For example they stated that apostates from Islam should be killed if they do not repent within three days of being warned and that treachery is a permanent characteristic of non-Muslims, especially Jews. ...Shiites constitute 10 to 15 percent of the population. Approximately 80 percent of Shia are "Twelvers" (followers of Muhammad ibn Hasan al-Mahdi, whom they recognize as the Twelfth Imam) and are primarily located in the Eastern Province. Twelver Shia adhere to the Jafari school of jurisprudence. Most of the remaining Shiite population are Sulaimaniya Isma'ilis, also known as "Seveners" (those who branched off from the Twelvers to follow Isma'il ibn Jafar as the Seventh Imam).Seveners reside primarily in Najran Province, around the residence of their sect's spiritual leader in Al Mansourah. In the western Hejaz region, there are approximately 100,000 Ashraf (descendants of the Prophet Muhammad) and 150,000 Nakhawala, or "Medina Shia." Additionally, statistics put the number of Zaydis (followers of Zayd ibn Ali, whom they recognize as the fifth Imam) at approximately 500,000. The Zaydis reside primarily in the cities of Jizan and Najran along the border with Yemen. ...The government permits Shiite judges presiding over courts in the Eastern Province to use the Jafari school of Islamic jurisprudence to adjudicate cases in family law, inheritance, and endowment management. There were six Shiite judges, all located in the Eastern Province cities of Qatif and al-Ahsa, where the majority of Shia lived. Shia living in other parts of the Eastern Province, Najran Province, and the western Hejaz region had no access to local, regional, or national Shiite courts. Shia face systematic and pervasive official and legal discrimination, including in education, employment, the military, housing, political representation, the judiciary, religious practice, and media. Primary reasons include the widely-held view that Shia are polytheists and that they commit apostasy by practicing some of their worship activities, historical Sunni-Shia animosity, and suspicion of Iranian influence on their actions. ...Unlike for Sunni mosques, the government does not finance construction or maintenance of Shiite mosques, and the process for obtaining a government-required license for a Shiite mosque is reportedly unclear and arbitrary. However, Shia have the right to manage their own mosques and to be supervised by Shiite scholars... Shiite courts' powers are limited by the fact that any litigant who disagrees with a ruling can seek a new decision from a Sunni court. Sunni court rulings can void Shiite court rulings, and government departments can choose not to implement judgments rendered by Shiite judges. Jurisdictionally these courts are only allowed to rule on cases in the Qatif and al-Ahsa areas; Shia from other regions cannot use such courts. Most Shia expressed general concerns about discrimination in religious practice, education, employment, political representation, the judiciary, and the media. The government generally limited public religious practice to activities that conform to the official interpretation of Islam. Practices that diverged from the official interpretation, such as celebrating Maulid Al-Nabi (the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad) and visits to the tombs of renowned Muslims, were forbidden. Enforcement was more relaxed in some communities than in others. For example, authorities allowed Shia in the Eastern Province city of Qatif greater freedom in their religious practices, including the public commemoration of Ashura (the "day of grief"). This event was held with minimal government interference. In other areas with large Shiite populations, such as al-Ahsa and Dammam, authorities restricted Shiite religious activities, including public observances of Ashura, public marches, loudspeaker broadcasts of clerics' lectures from Shiite community centers, and, in some instances, gatherings within those centers. Shia described restrictions on their visits to Mecca and Medina as interference by Riyadh-based authorities in private Muslim worship. In addition government religious authorities continued the practice of destroying ancient Islamic historical sites. Shiite mosques in mixed religious neighborhoods reportedly were required to recite the Sunni call to prayer, which is distinct from the Shiite call, at prayer times. Moreover, although Shia combine two of the five daily Sunni prayers, Shiite businessmen were often forced to close their shops during all five prayer times, in accordance with the country's official Sunni practices. Link To Full Report http://abna.ir/data.asp?lang=3&id=266230
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...