Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'women'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Main Forums
    • Guest Forum
    • Theology and General Religion
    • Personalities in Islam
    • Prophets and Ahlul-Bayt
    • Jurisprudence/Laws
    • Politics/Current Events
    • Social/Family/Personal Issues
    • Science/Tech/Economics
    • Education/Careers
    • Medicine/Health/Fitness
    • Off-Topic
    • Poetry and Art
    • Polls
    • Shia/Sunni Dialogue
    • Christianity/Judaism Dialogue
    • Atheism/Philosophy/Others
    • Research into Other Sects
    • Arabic / العَرَبِية
    • Farsi / فارسی
    • Urdu / اُردُو‎
    • Other languages [French / français, Spanish / español, Chinese / 汉语, Hindi / हिन्दी, etc.. ]
    • North/Central/South America
    • Europe
    • Asia, Middle East, Africa
    • Australia and Others
    • Site Tech Support/Feedback
    • Site FAQs
  • Seasonal Forums (Archive)
    • Muharram 1440/2018
    • Ramadhan 1439/2018
    • Ask our Special Guests!
    • ShiaChat.com reports from Karbala (2004)
    • Ali Naqi Memorial (Sept. 3, 1985 - March 26, 2006)
    • ShiaChat.com Yearbook, 2006-2007
  • The Hadith Club's Topics
  • Food Club's Topics
  • Sports Club's Topics
  • Reverts to Islam's Topics
  • Travel Club's Topics
  • Mental Health/Psych Club's Topics
  • Arts, Crafts, DIY Club's Topics
  • The Premier League Club's Topics

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Facebook


Website URL


Yahoo


Skype


Location


Religion


Mood


Favorite Subjects

Found 86 results

  1. I am interested in knowing how women manipulate men, I can imagine how but I don't exactly know the method by which a women would/could manipulate a man and also how often do women try to use their gender specific ability to manipulate men? and How can a man be wary of this, what are the signs when a women tries to manipulate someone?
  2. I don't understand why shia Muslim women aged 18-20 think it is too early for them to get married? Do they actually believe it is too early or do they use this as an excuse to reject proposals?
  3. This black guy was laying his hands on the shoulders of this Muslim women. I saw this after we all got out of the lecture theatre, I don't think the black guy knows that Muslim women don't like being touched by non mahram, especially by non Muslims, or I assume they don't. What are my obligations according to Islamic law? do I talk to any of them or just leave them alone?
  4. Salam Alaikum, Inshaallah this writing will enlighten us all. With the prayer of success, FB/Sisters In Islam ________________________ Commentary on Nahjul Balagha Sermon 80 – The “Deficiencies” in Women by : Ayatullah al-Uzma Hajj Shaykh Nasir Makarim Shirazi In order for us to truly understand the status and character of women in Nahjul Balagha, we need to refer to the Qur’an and then understand the position of women in Nahjul Balagha vis-à-vis what is contained in the Qur’an. Without a doubt, historical events have a great deal of influence on one’s speech and if we don’t keep in mind the history behind the words of Imam Ali , then the message behind his words would be lost. Thus, the description and analysis of women he has given in his sermons must be read and understood in the light of specific historical events which were taking place that he was forced to speak about. As it has been mentioned in the discussion concerning the transmission of this sermon (as seen below), Imam Ali delivered this sermon after The Battle of the Camel (Al-Jamal) which took place in Basrah (Iraq) in the year 656 CE/35 AH and the subsequent defeat of the army of Ayesha b. Abu Bakr. In this sermon, he reproaches women, and of course the meaning of him ‘reproaching women’ are only those types of women who had launched (such calculated) attacks - those who were responsible for instigating The Battle of the Camel. Imam Ali referred to such women as having a “deficiency” and it was because of this shortcoming that they engaged in such detrimental activities. Therefore, he reprimanded them and warned the believers to steer clear of their inductions. There is no doubt that these three forms of ‘deficiency’ have their own understandings. If Allah has removed the responsibility of praying and fasting from women during their monthly menstruation period, then it is because during the time of their menstruation, they enter into an “almost-ill” period in which they require rest and they are not in a position to engage in acts of worship. If the testimony of two women is equivalent to one man than it is due to the fact that the sentiments and emotions of a woman often overpower them and they may give testimony in favour of one and to the determinant of another merely based on their emotions. A woman’s portion of the inheritance is half of that of a man only in certain circumstances when children and wives are inheriting from the man; whereas in relation to inheriting from a father and mother – in many instances – the inheritance (of a man and woman) are the same and also in regards to the inheritance of brothers and sisters and their children – their inheritance is also similar. In order words: a woman – as a mother or sister – in many instances, takes an equal share of inheritance as a man. Another reason why sometimes the man gets double the share of inheritance than the woman is due to the fact that the financial maintenance and all of the woman’s daily requirements are the responsibility of the men (in her life) and not only does the woman not have to spend her own money on the maintenance of her children, but in fact her husband must provide all of her requirements, even if a large amount of money comes to her by way of inheritance or anything else. Therefore, all of these differences (between the genders) which Islam has brought have been carefully calculated (and there are logical reasons behind each one of them). At the end of the sermon, the Imam brings a short conclusion and states that: "So beware of the evils of women. Be on your guard even from those of them who are (reportedly) good." He concludes his sermon and says: "Do not obey them even in good things so that they may not attract you to the evil things." It is clear that the meaning of ‘not obeying women even in good things’ does not mean that if they encourage towards good actions such as the prayers (salat), fasting, justice and goodness that we are to disobey them; rather it means that we must not unconditionally follow them. In other words, ‘goodness’ must be performed because it is good, and not because one’s spouse has commanded it to be done, such that onebecomes bold and they think that they now can order you to do bad things and that they will be obeyed. Even though the wordings in Nahjul BalÁgha in this section are not specifically directed to one’s wife and all women in general have been included in the discussion, however it is clear that such an issue would usually occur more so within the context of a husband and wife relationship. Therefore, what has been mentioned in this sermon - and also keeping in mind the verses of the Quran which speak on the obligation to enjoin the good and forbid the evil, and the necessity to accept that from others - applies TO MEN AND WOMEN ALIKE, and the meaning of this sermon is not that one needs to ignore the performance of good deeds! Rather, the meaning of this sermon is that one’s actions must not be done through unconditional obedience (of another person). In any case, those women with true faith, awareness, intellect and dedication (to the faith of Islam) are definitely exempt from this ruling; those women whose pleasure lies in Allah's pleasure; whose anger is the anger of Allah - such as Fatima al-Zahra - whose commands were nothing other than advising towards goodness and righteousness, and who constantly sought to attain the pleasure and closeness of the Creator. This point is also clear that when it is said: ‘be careful of even the good ones amongst them’ that “good” is a relative term and is not absolute, as one should not only not be on the lookout for those who possess ‘absolute goodness’, rather one must accept such a person’s advice and consider their council as being worth something. It is for this reason that in the history of Islam, we see men who gave great importance to the suggestions of their wives. In some of the verses of the Qurann we see that asking women for advice has actually been considered as a noble trait. For example in regards to weaning a child off of his mother’s milk, we read the following in Suratul Baqarah, verse 233: "Mothers shall suckle their children for two full years — that for such as desire to complete the suckling … And if the couple desire to wean, with mutual consent and consultation, there will be no sin upon them…" "Indeed the muslim men and the muslim women, the faithful men and the faithful women, the obedient men and the obedient women, the truthful men and the truthful women, the patient men and the patient women, the humble men and the humble women, the charitable men and the charitable women, the men who fast and the women who fast, the men who guard their private parts and the women who guard, the men who remember God greatly and the women who remember [God greatly] —God holds in store for them forgiveness and a great reward. (Quran, 33:35) This well-known verse of the Quran also classifies the spiritual proximity which one can attain to Allah as being accessible by anyone regardless of their gender – male or female: ___________ In a hadith which the late Shaykh al-Kulayni quotes in his book Al-Kafi, we read the following: The sister, by way of suckling with the same wet-nurse who also took care of and fed the Prophet Muhammad , came to the Prophet and when she entered into his room and saw him, she became extremely elated and spread her own coverlet on the ground and made him sit on it. She then began to speak warm words with him and when she was about to leave the Prophet , her brother came (this sister and brother were two of the children of Halimatul Sadiyah who was the suckling mother of the Prophet ), however the Prophet did not treat his sister (by way of suckling) in the same way that he treated her brother (even though he treated them both with respect and love). Some people asked the Prophet of Allah , “The same level of respect which you displayed to your sister you did not extend to your brother (by way of suckling) – is it because he is a man?” The Prophet replied: “[This was because] she is much nicer to her mother and father than he (the brother) is.” It is interesting to note that the companions felt that how you treat a person should be based on their gender, however not only did the Prophet not consider that as being a means of distinction (in society), rather he placed a woman - his sister, due to her upholding the Divine values and morals, at a loftier position. Full text : http://library.compassionatefather.org/En/the-deficiencies-of-women-in-the-eyes-of-imam-ali-in-nahjul-balagha/
  5. Assalamualaikum. I am a recent convert to Shia islam, alhamdulillah. When I was learning how to pray, I was watching videos and looking at images and I couldn't help notice women were wearing prayer dresses and chadors/khimars. Or is this only in muslim countries? My understanding is that women have to cover everything but their face and hands when praying but is a covering like a prayer dress compulsory? Also, I would like to purchase a prayer dress, regardless of if it's compulsory or not and I live in Birmingham, UK so does anyone know where I can buy one. If a prayer dress is not possible, a chador or khimar would do. Jazakh'Allah
  6. Salam 'Alaikum Allow me to introduce this page "Sisters In Islam" This page aims to provide the true teaching of Ahlulbayt regarding women issues The speeches of Imam Ali Khamenei, Imam Khomeini regarding women issues The writing of Islamic scholars regarding women issues, the concept of hijab, the importance of modesty etc And inshaallah with all this knowledge and understanding that we may gain from this page, hopefully we can combat all the misconception, superstitious thought, regarding women issues. I have met many who claim to be a Muslim but their level of understanding regarding this issue is very low. As a consequence we tend to suppress/oppress those who are weak without we realize it. And we tend to easily be influenced by the Western perspective on women issues. There are also some pages that presenting the women issue in a very distorted way in the name of Islam. So inshaallah we hope this new page will help to overcome the distorted image of Islam presented by such pages. Therefore my dear brothers and sisters, Kindly help us to promote this page, invite your friends to follow this page, and if any of you have anything beneficial to be shared on this page, please feel free to inform us https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sisters-In-Islam/385767358246015 May Allah bless you all With the prayer of success, FB/Sisters In Islam
  7. (salam) How's it going everybody? Brace yourselves... What are the conditions for being a legitimate witness under Shari'ah for Nikah, transaction, and against a crime? Must there be two women in place of one man only during a transaction, or does this ruling apply to the other scenarios as well? Can a slave be a witness for Nikah or transaction or in a court against a crime? Can he testify against his master? If the scenario calls for two women in place of one man, will slave women count? If so, how many are required? When is a non-Muslim's testimony accepted? When is a non-Muslim woman's testimony accepted? When is a non-Muslim slave's testimony accepted? When is a non-Muslim slave woman's testimony accepted? Is a non-Baligh's testimony ever accepted? What about a non-Baligh girl? What about a non-Baligh slave? What about a non-Baligh slave girl? What about a non-Muslim non-Baligh? What about a non-Muslim, non-Baligh girl? What about a non-Muslim, Non-Baligh slave? What about a non-Muslim, non-Baligh slave girl? Please try to answer as many as you can through any source you find reliable. I have Taqleed of Sayed Sistani (ha), but such detailed questions are usually not found in any common books of the Maraaji'. And this one does not fit the title, but I will ask it anyway: Can an 'Aadil, Baligh, Male, Muslim Slave be a judge? Can he lead prayer? Can attain Ijtihad and be a Marja'? Please do not turn this into something it is not. Do not "hijack" the thread. Let us keep the discussion to what is being asked and to a bare minimum. Thanks ShiaChat peeps. (wasalam)
  8. Is it just me or has anyone else feeling this way as well? - Marriage has become really hard for me, and Zina has become really easy. I've looked around for marriages, spent money, told parents, done everything, found potential mutah but in the end its probably all a failure, on the other hand, I asked a girl out and it was extremely easy and she said yes, but I called it off later so we are just friends (thank god). - At gatherings, the only subjects that's are interesting to most people there are back biting, or laughing at other people. try asking a serious question and you seem like a mood killer. Don't encourage back biting by not laughing and you are seen as boring. Sit among the young and all they talk about is sex, women, laugh at each other by calling each other names, animals, or hit each other. - when we have guests or we are guests at someone else home, most people who sit there, are sitting from evening to midnight, I get up to pray and they all look ashamed but they don't get up, when I get up to pray it feels like as if I'm not supposed to, although they can't tell me not to pray they still go silent and stare with the corner of their eye. It's like as if everything has turned upside down. I used to get called a loser at school because I didn't flirt with girls and didn't have a girl friend. I still don't know how to flirt, usually I help them if they need it and run. Recently I saw something very disturbing, it was a Muslim girl in an extreme Islamic outfit making out with another Muslim guy in a very busy public area, they are both at my uni and I know they are not halal for each other. I felt like punching them both. I tried fasting to keep lust off and it still didn't work, everyone is wearing clothing that is revealing, the whole point of clothing is to cover oneself but the clothing today hides the bad bits and makes attractive the good bits, to be honest women would look less attractive naked then in some of the clothing they wear. this is because if they were naked, everything would hang and look sloppy but the clothing makes those parts look 'full of life'. these are just some of the things I can remember and explain, share your experience. I live in the UK btw, where all non-muslim women are on a mission to look seducing. And give some advice to help me cope.
  9. (salam) I was woundering that how come the quran comands women in surah Al Ahzab verse 59 to wear Jilbab, but the ma'rij say it is nlt mandatory. I understand that a long dress can subsitute it. From my understand women can not dress in pants infront of non-mahram men. Is this true? Also, does your body type effect how much you should cover, or the type of clothing you should wear? :wacko:
  10. "One of the first confronting and invasive questions that I was asked by a tutor during my first year at university was whether or not my parents would marry me off at a young age. This stereotype is one of many ridiculous and negative perceptions associated with the Arab woman. Indeed, the Arab woman is constantly and consistently perceived as a mystery hidden by a tantalising veil. She is shrouded from head to toe in black. She is a desirable, buxom and passionate creature. She is a wife trailing behind her husband. She is a mother who is overburdened by too many children. She is thewoman who “stole” George Clooney’s heart. She is a woman wailing on television at her loss. But most importantly, she is undeniably absent from the discussion taking place, the world over, about Arab women. The Sydney Morning Herald recently published a story about the Miss Lebanon Australia Beauty Pageant with the headline “Miss Lebanon Australia shows off new Arab woman“. The article quoted the pageant’s beauty and art director, Monie Gabriel, as saying that the contestants were an example of “the new Arab woman”. ”It has been the perception that Lebanese women often married young and concentrated on having children, but these days as you can see, the women are doing everything,” she said. Ms Gabriel’s reference to the existing stereotypes about Arab women is pertinent. The Arab woman is often used as a canvass for Western ideas about the Orient, or the East. She exists as a backdrop, as an ornament, and as an object that is, all at once, desired, pitied, and objectified. The Arab woman has no inherent depth, complexity or independence, or so we are led to believe by the mass media. She is merely a beautiful conquest, a creature of desire and a means to procreation. Hibah Aburwein, from the European Forum on Muslim women, puts it perfectly. “The Arab woman is used only as a sexual symbol and is observed as manifestation without deep recognition of her actual character. Arab women were always victims of the stereotyping process. There is little understanding of either their status as women or the total context of Arab woman lives. There is also very little understanding about the Arab woman’s role in the social, political, academic, and practical life.” According to its art director, the purpose of the Miss Lebanon Australia contest is to obliterate these well-established stereotypes about (Arab) culture and religion by enlisting contestants that are both intelligent and sexy. The contest can, therefore, showcase to the West the “new Arab woman” whose value is no longer dependent on the men that surround her because she is now a high achiever “studying a range of subjects from mechanical engineering to law and medical science”. But when was a beauty contest ever imbued with strong messages about power, religion and race? How can a contest that focuses on the image and perception of beauty be heralded as a platform to showcase the might of the new Arab woman? This new Arab woman engages in society by showcasing her beauty to a panel of judges. She is breaking down stereotypes by embracing the stereotype of an Arab woman as exotic. Arab women are no longer just getting married young and being baby-making machines; “they are doing everything”. Arab women are willingly competing to be the object of the voyeur. Orientalism has triumphed. Arab women are already represented in Western popular culture primarily as harem girls, belly dancers, and oppressed women who are veiled. According to Amira Jarmakani, an associate professor of women’s studies at Georgia State University, the veil, the harem, and the belly dancer are cultural mythologies that purport to represent the realities of Arab and Muslim women through sweeping generalisations that rob these women’s experiences of their diversity and historical context. She claims that these images masquerade as accurate portrayals of Arab and Muslim women’s lives. The beauty contest is an extension of this masquerade of Arab women’s lives. It sheds no light on the personality or complexity of its contestants. Indeed the contestants are not interviewed; they are merely discussed by a third party. They are pictured above the article itself preparing for the pageant, but we know nothing of them except that they are young, smart and attractive. Surely, women who are doing everything can speak for themselves? In sidelining the contestants, Arab women are again absent from discussions on Arab women. So, then, what does Miss Lebanon Australia achieve, and what does she represent? This article merely reinforces the stereotype of the Arab woman as exotic by promoting a tokenistic and meaningless contest, and by heralding it as the place to “show off” the “new Arab woman.” http://sajjeling.com/2014/05/04/the-problems-with-miss-lebanon-australia/ what do you think?
  11. Hey dear sisters! I hope you are all doing well. You see, the reason for my post today is to talk about some things that frustrate me about people's attitude towards the hijab. I am sure not everyone disrespects the hijab, but a large number of the people I've met do, and I could not help bringing this to topic. Opinions please? [rest of post deleted]
  12. I am going to visit my parents in America in a month or so, and I am newly religious. I live in Lebanon, and I have gotten use to not shaking hands with men since I put my scarf on in 2009. My husband is also moderatly religious as I am. We are so worried about whats going to happen when we go to America and we dont shake hands with men/women. How am I suppose to explain my stance? Without them thinking I am an extemist maniac? My dad is Sunni & doesnt really support some of my religious boundries. If there is anyone out there with this problem, please enlighten me on how you act when an old friend comes charging at you with a hug when you havent seen them for 3 years. Or when you are almosted forced to shake someones hand! Like what do we do!
  13. A few lines from an article recounting an incident of violence against a woman and the silence of society, especially of 'religious' people who otherwise are the most loudest and fiercest when it comes to battling perceived affronts to the faith and the faithful. I did not see any religious political or social organisation out in the streets in their hundreds to condemn violence against (Muslim) women. Only some so called "secular" NGOs protested. Italics are mine. PS I am posting this thread not in South Asian affairs but here because I think behaviours mentioned in this report are symptomatic of wider social attitudes in contemporary Muslim societies. Read full HERE
  14. (bismillah) (salam) I've been reading this book by Wael Hallaq, entitled An Introduction to Islamic Law, and, in it, I came across an interesting passage where he gives a historical perspective into the dealings of the Muslim courts, with respect to women and I found it an interesting reply to those who argue women are disadvantaged in Islam as it clearly shows that while Islamic Law favours men in certain places (such as daughters only getting half the inheritance of their fathers, as compared to the sons), women also possess distinct advantages in other areas - while, at the same time, giving us valuable insight into how we can reform the current situation within Muslim communities: "Divorce, as the jurists understood very well, and as legal practice testifies, was a very costly financial enterprise for the husband, let alone that in many cases it was effectively ruinous (a fact which may also explain the rarity of polygamy). Upon [the invocation of the right to unilateral] divorce [by the husband], the ex-wife was entitled to maintenance for at least three months, delayed dower, children’s maintenance, any debts the husband incurred to her during the marriage (a relatively frequent occurrence), and if the children were young, a fee for nursing. And if the husband had not been consistent in paying for marital obligations (also a relatively frequent occurrence), he would owe the total sum due upon the initiation of divorce." THAT WAS THE SHORT QUOTE. IF YOU WANT TO READ MORE, WELL, CARRY ON: Furthermore, "In this context, it must be clear that when women entered marriage, they frequently did so with a fair amount of capital, which explains why they were a source of lending for many husbands and why so many of them engaged in the business of money-lending in the first place. In addition to the immediate dower and the financial and material guarantees for her livelihood, the wife secured a postponed payment, but one that she could retrieve at any time she wished (unless otherwise stipulated in the contract). But equally significant was the trousseau that she received from her parents, customarily consisting of her share of her natal family’s inheritance paid in the form of furniture, clothing, jewelry and at times cash. Many women, before or during marriage, were also endowed with a waqf portion, giving them further income. Whatever the form of the trousseau and the total wealth they could accumulate, women were entirely aware of 66 An Introduction to Islamic Law their exclusive right to this wealth, and understood well that they were under no obligation to spend any portion of it on others or even on themselves. They apparently spent their own money on themselves only if they chose to do so, since such expenses as pertained to sustenance, shelter and clothing (in the expansive meaning of these terms if the husband was prosperous) were entirely his responsibility, not hers. In other words, unlike that of husbands, the property of wives was not subject to the chipping effect of expenditure, but could instead be saved, invested and augmented. Considering the unassailability over the centuries of these rights–which on balance availed women of property accumulation–it is not surprising that, in the historical record, unilateral divorce by the husband appears to be less common than KHULʿ, the contractual dissolution of marriage (where the wife surrenders some of her financial rights in exchange for divorce). The relative frequency ofkhulʿ in Istanbul, Anatolia, Syria, Muslim Cyprus, Egypt and Palestine has been duly noted by historians. It is a phenomenon that explains –in this context –three significant features of Muslim dissolution of marriage. First, while the husband could divorce unilaterally, there was also a“price”that he paid for this prerogative. In other words, the average husband was constrained by hefty financial deterrents, coupled with legal and moral deterrents installed by the law as well. Second, the husband’s unilateral divorce in effect also amounted to a one-way transfer of property from the husband to the wife, beyond and above all that he was–for the duration of the marriage – obliged to provide his wife by default. In fact, an important effect of this transfer was the fact that many repudiated women purchased the husband’s share in the matrimonial house, funneling the divorce payment due to them toward such a purchase. Third,khulʿ, within the economic equation of Muslim marriages, was in a sense less of a depletion of the woman’s property because the payment by the wife was usually the delayed dower her husband owed her, plus her waiting period allowance. This was so typical that the juristic manuals reflected this practice as a normative doctrine. The point, however, remains that it was the very financial promise made by the groom that was used as the bargaining chip for khulʿ. Khulʿ, a means by which a woman could exit an unhappy marriage, provides an excellent context to assess domestic violence against womenand other causes of their marital discord. Because they had fairly easy access to the courts, unhappy wives had the option of addressing themselves to the qadi, who would assign officials of the court to investigate the abuse or other harm that made these women’s marriage unbearable. If abuse was proven, the court had the power to dissolve the marriage, as it often did. The law also allowed the woman the right to self-defense, including, under certain circumstances, the killing of an abusive husband. But if the husband was not at fault, a wife who found her marriage unbearable could at least dissolve it by khulʿ. The formal legal aspect of such situations might well be augmented by another social aspect. Obviously, the ties of the wife/woman with heroriginal family were not, upon marriage, severed, and her parents, brothers and sisters continued to watch closely as the marriage of their daughter/ sister unfolded. It was, after all, the parents of the wife who had usually arranged the marriage, and who were at least to some extent responsible for it as well as for the well-being of their daughter. If the marriage failed, they not only had to deal with such a failure in the public space, but also had to“take back”their daughter, with all the economic and other consequences this“taking back”might entail. Their interest in the success of their daughter’s marriage explains the close scrutiny many families exercised (and still do) to prevent abuse by the husband of their daughter (including such measures as the beating of the abusive husband by the wife’s brothers). Unlike the present situation of many women who, in the nuclear family of today, must fend for themselves, women in earlier Islamic societies continued to have the psychological and social –and when necessary economic–backing of their original families. This obviously did not prevent abuse in all cases, but it did contribute significantly to its reduction. However, when all attempts had failed, the wife’s original family, often with the collaboration of the husband’s own family, would exercise the necessary pressures to bring the marriage to an end, before the qadi or not. Finally, a few words about women and property rights are in order. Making up about 40 percent of the real estate dealers in some cities, women regularly approached the court to register their sales and purchases, recording in this way the fact that they were heavily involved intransactions related to house transfers. As court litigation and registries show, women owned both residential and commercial properties, mainly rent-earning shops. They often owned their own houses, and frequently jointly purchased houses with their husbands, during, but also before, the marriage. As already mentioned, when they were repudiated by their husbands, they often bought the latter’s share in their matrimonial house with the very money their husbands owed them as a result of divorce. Women were also participants in one of the most powerful economies in Muslim lands, namely, the real property dedicated as waqf, which, by the dawn of European colonialism, constituted between 40 and 60 percent of all real property. Except for the largest endowments, usually established by sultans, kings, viziers and emirs, many of the founders of medium-size and smaller waqfs were women. They often foundedand managed endowments alone, and to a lesser extent they were also co-founders, along with males and other females. A relatively impressive number of waqfs were established by manumitted female slaves associated with the political and military elites, and these too established waqfs independently as well as with their (former) masters (a fact that attests to the financial, and even political, power of female slaves).Waqfs of modest range appear to have been established by men and women in equal numbers. Their participation in the important waqf economy began early on, and steadily increased throughout the centuries. By the eighteenth century, women constituted between 30 and 50 percent of waqf founders. In some places, there were more women establishing endowments than men. In certain cities, a significant number, and at times more than half, of the endowments established by women were public, dedicated to religious and educational purposes or to caring for and feeding the poor. And like men, most women creating endowments purchased their properties for this purpose. It is only reasonable to assume that more women benefited from waqf endowments as beneficiaries than there were women who founded suchendowments. Quantitative evidence of the proportions of men and women who were waqf beneficiaries has still to be tabulated, but the general evidence thus far points to well-nigh equal numbers. The theory that the juridical instrument of waqf was used to deprive females of their entitlements to inheritance no longer stands, for it appears, to the contrary, that the waqf was resorted to in order to create a sort of matrilineal system of property devolution. Equally important, however, was the crucial factor of avoiding the partition of family property (which Quranic inheritance tended to do), this frequently having harmful economic effects that were curbed by having recourse to the waqf instrument. It should therefore not be surprising to find many waqf deeds that allocate to the beneficiaries the same proportional entitlement to the estate as the Quranic shares. One historian has found that in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Aleppo women were disadvantaged as inheritors in less than 1 percent of the 468 waqf deeds she examined. Women generally designated more females than males as beneficiaries, while some 85 percent of men designated their wives and/or daughters, a situation that obtained in sixteenth-century Istanbul as well. The same pattern occurs with regardto rights of residency in the family dwelling of the founder. The great majority of waqf deeds–in Aleppo, Istanbul and elsewhere –did not discriminate against females, nor did they limit their rights in any way. But when they did, the restriction did not preclude the right to live in the house until marriage, or to return to it when they became orphaned or divorced. Nor did preclusion apply to female descendants, a fact that“left the door open for married women and their spouses and their offspring to claim their rights to live in the house.” Women were also deemed to be as qualified as men in their capacity as managers of endowments, an influential administrative and financial position. Although there were more men than women performing this function, a large number of women appear as administrators of waqfs established by their fathers, mothers, grandparents and distant relatives. In the eyes of the court too, women manifestly had precedence over younger males as administrators. And like men, women reserved for themselves the right to be the first administrators of their own endowments. They also reserved and used the right to sue against infringements of waqf rights, on behalf of themselves as well as others. In sum, Muslim women were full participants in the life of the law. As one historian has put it with regard to Ottoman women, they“used their right of access to the courts to promote their interests, in which a manumitted slave could restrict the claim of her past master to her estate, where a farm woman could challenge the claim of a creditor upon the expensive livestock she had purchased, where a widow could assert her priority right to buy her husband’s share in real property, and where a woman traveling alone from one village to another could charge a police officer with obstructing her path.” But if the law depended, in its proper functioning, on the moral community, then women–just as much as men – were the full bearers of the very morality that the law and the court demanded. And as moral denizens, or denizens who aspired to the power that was generated by moral character, they engaged in the law, losing and winning on the way. As participants in the legal system, they developed their own strategies, and drew on the moral and social resources available to them. They no doubt lived in a patriarchy, but the inner dynamics of this patriarchy afforded them plenty of agency that allowed them a great deal of latitude. That“Islamic modernity”has often proven to be oppressive of women, as we shall see inchapter 8, cannot take away from the fact that for a millennium before the dawn of modernity they compared favorably with their counterparts in many parts of the globe, particularly in Europe."
  15. Salaam all! InshAllah everyone is doing well today. So today I had to go grocery shopping and once I was finished and waiting in line for my turn I instantly feel someone touching my back.... :blink: freaked out I turn around and see and old white guy just standing there telling me how my scarf was pretty, I told him not to touch me again and I guess he got mad at me for asking him not to touch me so he decided to say a few words that were very inappropriate and uncalled for, like i was a stuck up ------. Alhamdulilah my older sister was with me and she was furious :realangery: :mad: long story short the guy was asked to leave the store. This just had me wondering if this happened to you what would you do? a lot of sisters have encounters like this and I would like to know what you did? Brothers also what would you do if it was your sister or something. I don't know feel free to say whatever. Masalama
  16. why is it not wajib for Men,in Islam, to put on hijab,whilst it is wajib for Women to do so?? is it that women are more attractive than men by nature??>>not true,makes no sense is it because men are more into s** and that stuff ...and women have more control over that desire?>>>makes no sense is it for no reason?>>... please,can anyone convince me of the reason behind that...(why men don't have to put a veil and cover their bodies?) thanks in advance..
  17. Asalaamu alaikum, I just wanted to announce for anyone that's interested, I recently started up a blog for talking about different subjects related to Islam, social issues facing Muslims, issues of Muslims in the West, and convert related issues. The blog can be found at http://kadhimontreal.com . As in, my pen-name is kadhim, and I'm in Montreal. Only one "m" in the middle though and all one word. I have about six posts up so far, but I can promise a steady stream of a few posts a week over at least the next few months, as I've got an archive of about 60 other articles from a previous website project that I plan to review, repurpose, and republish. And hopefully some brand new material as the spirit moves me ;) Anyhow, feel free to take a look, to read, to comment, to subscribe. Enjoy! Fee iman illah "kadhim"
  18. Salaam Alaykum everyone. I've been looking through some hadith books and I cant seem to find the rights of a woman in divorce: What I mean by this is... when a woman has asked for a divorce, but her husband is saying he shall never grant her one (he doesn't care about what she's trying to say, and what her wishes are) Then what are her rights according to Ahlul Bayt? Does anyone have hadiths? This is an example of somebody I know, who her husband treats her badly, beating her, disrespecting her etc.. and finally after forgiving as much as she can take, she gives up and begs for a divorce. I'm sorry if this might hurt anyone, I hope somebody can help me inshaAllah find these hadiths. Wa Salaam.
  19. Salaam alaykom. I was reading a post about poligamy in Islam and it remind me a life-time question of mine!!!! As a muslim I totally accept the plogamy which is ruled by my beloved Allah :angel: . But as a woman, I even cannot imagine my husband even thinking about another woman rather than me as a wife :angry: . Why is that? Is that because it is against women's nature? Since they can not tolerate any competitor by their side? I don't think that it is the answer. Becuse Allah would never rule a thing as appose to our nature and fitrah, would he? Any sister reading this? Or brothers? Any idea? Why some women can't accept it as a woman? And why some can? Where is the missed part of the puzzle?
  20. Salaam alaikum I'm a revert to Islam who has recently started to write a blog and create YouTube videos aimed at revert and womens issues. http://www.youtube.com/channel/UChz1r52-U2dFy5DSwEyuSdQ or search 'Revert Muslimah' http://revertshiamuslimah.blogspot.co.uk I would really appreciate some feedback or topic suggestions Jazakallahu khayr
  21. Hello I need help with a few things. This is my first post on this site. Firstly i want to tell you that I'm a shia, in my hole life i learnd about Islam and life what is halal and what is haraam. And I know about Islam i don't have any problems with it and I know it can help me alot in this life. But somtimes in life i pray and i don't do stuff that are haraam and it feels great it feels like life is good and that everything is going great. I have hade many friends that are girls no problem with that girls in school and so on. But somtimes a girl comes in to my life and i stop prayin, and i start doing bad stuff again like listen to music. And losing focus on Islam losing focus on learning losing focus on everything and start to just think about her and thats makes my life depressing so how can i stop with girls and have focus on Islam.? When i Don't like or want a girl i pray and i don't do bad stuff, My biggest problem is that i don't like to pray to Allah when i know i do haraam stuff when i know i don't commit sins i love to pray beacuse i do it beacuse i love Allah and that he is great with us. I know it is monafiq and I need help
  22. Hello dear brothers and sisters, I apologize in advance if I made any mistakes in my facts or wordings, and mean my questions with the up most respect. "After the Battle of the Trench in March 627 (named after a trench that the Muslims dug around parts of Medina) against a large coalition of Meccans and their allies, Muhammad S.A.W. imposed the ultimate penalty on the men in the Jewish clan, Qurayzah, the third Jewish tribe (he banished the Qaynuqa tribe in April 624 and the Nadir tribe in August 625). The Qurayzah tribe was supposed to remain neutral in the Battle, but they seem to have intrigued with the Meccans and to have been on the verge of attacking Muhammad S.A.W. from the rear. They were judged guilty by one of their Medinan Muslim allies, and 600 of the males were executed." The sentence: Death by decapitation for around 600 men, and enslavement for the women and children. Was it unjustly to kill 600 male Jews and enslave the women and children? Couldn't have Muhammad S.A.W. could have shown mercy, exiled them (as they may have requested), or executed only a few? The whole Qurayzah Jewish tribe never attacked the Muslims, and even if a few were to have done so, doesn't the punishment seem not to fit the crime? Was the execution excessive and disproportionate? What was the concept of slavery back then? Thank you
  23. http://arabia.msn.com/news/middle-east/1769434/the-international-topless-jihad-day/ Please tell me what you think of this. I'm too busy doing a facepalm to discuss my own opinions.
  24. The Women Affairs Minister in Pakistan, Mrs. Sheghufta Joomani, accompanied by a number of Pakistani political figures, were honored to visit the holy shrines of Imam Hussain and his brother Al-Abbas. They were given a tour of the Imam Hussain Museum to observe some of the rare and valuable ancient items. During the Interview, Mrs. Joomani stated that it was her ambition to visit Karbala, particularly the holy shrines and that it was "a dream come true." She also called on all Muslims of the world to visit the holy shrines to point the religion of Ahlul-Bayt as a triumph. http://imhussain.com/eng/index.php/reports/361-pakistani-women-affairs-minister-honored-to-visit-the-holy-shrines For more cultural news updates visit our website at www.imhussain.com
  25. I bet the thread title made you come here and see what on earth I was on about! So here's an article I read 2 days ago, interesting stuff. There was a time in which Persian men wore high heels and started a global fashion trend which reached Louis XIV. Ladies, you know who to be thanking for the invention of high heels :P http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21151350
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...