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  1. بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم Despite the repeated use of the phrase “there is no proof or evidence for the existence of God,” I would imagine most atheists, and indeed most people, are unaware that there is in fact a technical difference between evidence and proof. Fittingly, the distinction between proof and evidence was initially taught to me in an introductory evolutionary biology course by an ardent atheist professor during my first year of university. My professor used this distinction to justify why she would not be receiving objections to evolution in her class. (Literally, she said that we were not allowed to question evolution or present counter evidence during the lecture, and that she would not entertain it during her office hours.) It was the most bizarre and dogmatic moment I had in my entire education, and I say this as someone who was blessed to study theology in a seminary environment for a year. Contrary to popular opinion, the seminaries are far less dogmatic when it comes to foundational beliefs, as they permit questioning the existence of God and raising objections to the proofs offered. She argued that evolution was based upon good evidence, but could never attain the status of complete certainty. It was a probabilistic argument, like virtually all of science, rather than a demonstration, as in the case of mathematical proofs (and, as we shall see, metaphysical arguments.) I still vividly remember the slide used to showcase an example of rational certainty – it was that of a triangle with some lines and an accompanying trigonometric proof. Because evolution (along with all empirical science) could never attain 100% rational certainty, she argued that it was always possible to be a skeptic, to raise objections about inductive inferences which are probabilistic at best, or to posit alternative explanations that could explain the data, no matter how improbable. Oh the irony. If scientific atheists only applied their standards consistently, they would either deny science or accept God. We will see why more clearly later on when we explore the evidence for the existence of God. But there is neither here nor there. For now, what I want to do is just go over some basic concepts in reason in order to set the table for the coming arguments... This article was originally published on themuslimtheist.com. Click here to continue reading.
  2. Salaam brothers/sisters, I would really appreciate it if i could get some perspective and unbiased opinions about the path I am about to take. I am 22 years old living in the U.K. and have recently graduated and currently undergoing a placement year as part of my development before I undertake my masters. I am at a stage in my life where I am more concerned with the state of my akirah rather than the dunya. Having said that it hasn't always been like this and I'm very much early on in my journey. I feel a sense of conflict in myself and my beliefs. I question at times what we've been taught and how authentic our views are not shia in particular but the entire Ummah.I want to search for the truth by studying Islam throughly but as any young Muslim my age, the world doesn't work like that. I'm afraid of not being able to support my mother and father, if I leave to study I may be gone for a very long time and all that time they may struggle. I also feel as if it may be unjust for me to rush something like this and jump in head first but I've come to realise if I follow through with my career 100% I could provide for my family and live a very normal life but I would never reach fufillment and fall into a deeper depression, my heart would forever be searching for answers. I want to make a difference, I want to help spread truth and bring people together. So I wanted some opinions and a discussion as to what you would advise me to do if you've had a similar experience, where do I start?
  3. As salam aleykum my brothers and sisters in religion and in humanity. I converted to the religion of Islam more than a month ago and I have encountered some difficulties with family members. My mother who I first told months prior to taking my shahada that I wanted to convert to the religion of Islam was at first very accepting of this idea but I believe she thought it was all just a phase. After I took my shahada she seemed disappointed that I had made such a move and I know her fear comes only from a place of love and concern but I want to show her that this was a positive thing and I will be better as a person in the long run due to this change. My father is a traditional Aussie bloke and although very accepting and kind to Muslims in person he is easily influenced by what is said on television. I asked my mother not to tell him or any of our extended family of this change because I am so scared of being treated differently by these people who I love and respect. Any advice in showing my parents and extended family how its all gonna be OK? Any good talking points that I can use to help them accept this new change?
  4. Evolution at this point is a scientific fact. The only discrepancy is the origin of human reasoning. Putting aside this oddity in the application of natural selection leading to the origin of species, how can we neglect that macroevolution of nonhuman species is false?
  5. Salam Alaykum brothers and sisters in Islam and equals in humanity. This is a poem I wrote and recorded this poem for this year's Arbaeen period. May Allah shower you all with blessings infinitely. Feedback and comments are appreciated.
  6. Salaamu alaykum all. True example of Islamic akhlaq. May Allah increase this quality in the ummah.
  7. Assalamu Alaikum brothers and sisters, I am muhammad the son of the leader of the true shia severs who believe that imam Isma'il (AS) is really the final mahadi(Syed yahya Burhanudeen, we did not believe in any one who claim to be imam after our seven imam (imam Isma'il AS). i am looking for brothers and sisters globally. please you can send me your email so that we can chat more. wassalam.
  8. Guest

    Dahesh

    Hello, mr dahesh has 1000s saying he did miracles many many testimonies, of many miracles crazy ones raise the dead be in diff places at once all sorts. My imaan is lowered he started daheshism how can i refute i need yaqeen my imaan is low i am having doubts. Can anyone refute him and please help me i have nowhere else to turn.
  9. Why every time I that I mention Jesus and my love for him, the Muslim person I am speaking with goes into this script, (I feel like it is a script because diverse people have used the same words verbatim), of how they love Jesus too. They say, "One cannot be Muslim unless he believes in Jesus, I love Jesus, I love Jesus more than you" Honestly, this shows a great misunderstanding in the Muslim's person understanding. Do Muslim people realize that Christians do not love Jesus like as a prophet, we do not love him a religious duty. We surely do not love him in the context of a person from the Islamic faith would love him. We do not relate nor believe in him as someone from the Islamic faith. They might as well be two completely different people. (They have different life stories, deaths, resurrection, and prophecies told in the Koran and the Bible). Do Muslim people understand that when a Christian expresses their love for Jesus, they are referring to a love deeper than that of a mother, a child, or a husband/wife? This is a love of "savior", meaning: I was dead and he gave me life. I was poor and he gave me riches. I had ashes, he gave me beauty. He not only gave me life, but a blessed, abundant beautiful. I owe him my life. To me, this type of response to a Christian who talks about their love for Jesus reveals a wide gap of understanding from the Muslim person. Do you owe Jesus your life, did he stay with all night when you were alone and no one was there, did he sing to you songs and comfort and fill your heart with life, truth, and love? If not, then please don't tell me you love him, because you don't know him to love him. How do you love what you do not know? Maybe you love the idea of him, but not him. For example, a weak analogy would be you sharing about the birth of your son, and how much your son means to you and he is your life and your joy and your pride. The person you speak with who has never seen your son, nor knows him, says, "I love him too, more than you, I love him so much". He then says, "What's his name, I forgot" and goes his life without ever spending any time with or buying anything for your son. You would say, "Do not tell me you love my son, your words are just lip service, and flattery". Lip service and words are increasingly meaningless in this world when they have no action behind them. Does this frustration make sense, I always remind myself, the Muslim person has the best intention to make good relations with me, but they just do not understand as they should.
  10. Some time ago I argued that with the passing of time and the growth of Muslim communities in the West there would appear a different and distinct strain of Islam which might be dubbed "Western Islam." What it would mean and how it would look like is a debate that is still in its infancy, so it remains to be seen as what shape and form it would eventually take. There was a counterargument that there wouldn't be such a thing as Western Islam and that Muslims would either be religious in the traditional sense or they would abandon religion altogether. The number of atheists or agnostics is growing if personal experience is anything to go by, but at the same time many more people are trying to find that precarious balance that makes them be an integrated Western Muslim as well as a practicing one.
  11. The following excerpt is from The Muslim Theist Blog. Click here for the full original article. بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم Before we can answer the question “how can I know that God exists?” we must first ask the question “how do I know anything at all.” Or perhaps more appropriately, since God is not a “thing,” we should ask “how do I come to know?” As we shall see, all knowledge is ultimately grounded in what is unfortunately called “intuition” in English, but which is more appropriately called “immediate knowledge” or “knowledge by presence” in Islamic philosophy. I will nevertheless sometimes use the word intuition, but it should not be mistaken for the ordinary usage of simply having a “hunch” about something or the vain, amorphous imaginings of artists and poets. From intuition, in its proper sense, descends pure reason, with its capacity to give completely certainty based on deductive proofs. After that descends inductive reason, which allows us to make probabilistic arguments that reach a different kind of certainty. Lastly, we have sense perception, which contrary to popular belief is actually the lowest and least reliable form of knowledge. Sense perception, quite obviously, cannot on its own lead one to belief in God, since God is immaterial. It must be combined with either reasoning or intuition in order to yield fruit, at least as far as we’re interested in the question of God and meaning. Now the question for you, my dear reader, is what are you looking for? Are you looking to know God directly, unmitigated by any long-winded, tedious discourse involving minute reasoning? Are you looking for absolute proof of the existence of God, one that considers all objections and involves very precise reasoning? Would you be satisfied with a very compelling probabilistic argument, based on solid evidence, for the existence of God? Or perhaps, more darkly, you are here simply to “refute” any attempts to show that God is, in fact, Reality. Perhaps you have already made up your mind and are here simply to edify your ego, without the slightest intention to actually listen to what is being said and to make a genuine attempt at understanding. Perhaps if you were to hear something that might otherwise change your perspective, you would miss it simply because you are subconsciously committed to an uncharitable reading and fault finding rather than sincerity. If so, realize there is nothing to be gained in this world by proving that you are right, other than the momentary satisfaction of having domination over another soul, but everything to be gained through sincerity. With that reminder at hand, I shall assume going forwards that you are entirely sincere in seeking to know the truth, whatever it might be, and that you are entirely prepared to hear this humble author’s perspective. As to the previous concern, what will ultimately satisfy all human beings is the direct knowledge of God, which is acquired intuitively. When a person experiences God, by definition certainty is attained – light fills the heart and one’s phenomenological experience of Being radically alters. It might be wise then, to simply prescribe steps for how one might achieve this meeting with the Divine, so that one might see the Truth for themselves rather than merely hear of it second hand. Indeed within each religion, there is a mystical path that is aimed at precisely that, and if one wishes they are entirely free to embark upon such a path. However, a problem arises in that a person who is not already on this path wants to know with certainty that the object of the journey, namely God, does in fact exist and so such efforts would not be in vain. It seems to be asking a little much to tell a person they must completely change their lifestyle, values, and temporarily suspend their established beliefs about the nature of reality simply to experiment and see, perhaps, if God is indeed Real and as Glorious as He is made out to be – a highly dubious supposition to begin with if one is already entrenched in the atheist camp. Continue...
  12. Dear brothers and sisters, assalamu alaykum wa rahmatullah. This is my first post here. I am glad to join "ShiaChat" and I hope this forum will help me learn and understand more about the teachings of the Noble Prophet and his ahlul-bayt, peace be upon them. My first question pertains to homosexuality. My question is not whether or not homosexual acts are haram. I am aware that homosexual acts are unambiguously forbidden in Islam; as the Quran and the ahadith (from both Sunni and Shia sources) condemn homosexual acts in very clear terms. My question is: As Muslims, and more particularly as Shia Muslims, how should we understand homosexuality? Scientific research shows that people who are attracted to the same sex develop their orientation before their born. In other words, homosexuality (I am talking about the tendency and the inclination, and not the act) is not a choice, but a destiny. Is science right in saying this? If science isn't right, where is the counter-evidence? If science is right, and homosexuality is indeed a sexual orientation, why is it not treated as such in our sacred books? My impression is that the Quran and the ahadith mention sodomy as a sinful action but make no reference to homosexuality as a sexual orientation or a complete identity. The whole concept of sexual orientation seems to absent from our scriptures and religious literature. Furthermore, if we accept the scientific research (which we must accept unless conclusive counter-evidence is provided), how does this cohere with God's Justice and Mercy? Why would Allah, who is both Merciful and Just, place homosexual desires in the hearts of some of His servants; and then punish them for acting on those desires, and condemn them to a loveless life? By contrast, sexual desire directed towards the opposite sex can be halalified much more easily (through permanent marriages, and in the context of Shia Islam, temporary marriages). Lastly, in your opinion, what would be the best way to explain the Islamic stance on homosexuality, and the reason acts of sodomy were made haram, to a non-Muslim and non-religious person, on purely rational grounds and without reference to scripture? Many thanks for reading. I'll await your replies. JazakumuLlahu khayran.
  13. Guest

    Haram

    Salam alaykoum! I've been talking with a guy online and i really like him and he likes me too. I know that he isn't fake and i'm 100% sure of it because My friend knows him. Is IT haram for me to be in a distancerelationstips with him? We won't touch each other or something like that because I won't meet him in person. We will just like talk. Is it haram?
  14. Anyone need or want a few website links to some pretty good stuff? If so, you can have the ones below: http://nudba.com/wp/ (Shia video site) http://www.almizan.org/ (Tafsir Al-Mizan) http://islamicmobility.com/ (download free Islamic e-books in seconds) http://hadithdatabank.com/ (Hadith database of Ahl-ul-bayt) http://www.theislamicseminary.org/wp/ (full volumes of Al-Kafi) http://www.wikishia.net/ (An online encyclopedia of the school of Ahl al-Bayt Úáíå ÇáÓáÇã https://www.al-islam.org/ (Digital Islamic Library) Let me know of any I might want
  15. How do I combat the issue of non-Muslims always telling me that Prophet Muhammed (saww) was a warlord and used to engage in offensive warfare and raid caravans? I am Muslim myself but I don't have enough knowledge about this topic and I have a hard time finding anything about it online. Would appreciate any scholarly article links and such. Also I have an article on Aisha being actually at least 19 and NOT 9 or 7 or 8 or 6 when she got married that I can post but if anyone wants to give me more sources I would appreciate it. Thank you and al salamu alaykum
  16. Salam using scholastic realism, it is claimed that one can prove the existence of god. Can someone expand on this?
  17. If it is past experiences that shape a person, (and those past experiences or things that happen to him, he would not be able to control, i would say that God controls what happens to a person) then if it is past experiences that make someone bad, then are his bad actions blameworthy? EDIT: i meant to say would it be his fault
  18. Salaam Has anyone here ever recited Allah SWTs 99 names from duas.org / similar? i wanted to ask about the recitation of Ya Aziz- it is said to recite it 115x for acquaintance with the unseen...anyone tried this and any results?
  19. Assalaymu alaykom brothers and sisters. Does anyone know of someone who has filled out the application to the Hawza of al mustafa university? I was filling it out, but am confused with some of questions. Jazaak Allah khair.
  20. Salam! What are Nouman Ali Khan? Is he sunna or shia?
  21. Muharram is the first month of the Islamic calendar. On the first day of Muharram, the Islamic New Year is observed by Muslims. The Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, and is 11 to 12 days shorter than the solar year. Hence it is a little different from the Gregorian calender that is used in the western nations. When compared with the Gregorian calendar, which is a solar calendar, the lunar month of Muharram shifts from year to year. The month of Muharram is of great religious significance to Islamic people the world over. It is held to be the most sacred of all the months, excluding Ramadan. The word "Muharram" is often considered synonymous with "Ashura", the tenth day of the Muharram month. "Ashura" is a highly important day for both sects of Islam - the Shias and the Sunnis. The Shia muslims believe that Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, became a martyr at the Battle of Karbala on the tenth day of Muharram in 61 AH(680 AD). The pre-Islamic period in the Arabian peninsula was the era of warring tribes. In the absence of a strong leadership, there were conflicts and battles on minor issues. But fighting was prohibited in four months of the year. These months, of which Muharram was one, were considered sacred. Muharram is so called because it was unlawful to fight during this month; the word is derived from the word ‘haram’ meaning forbidden. This period of inactivity was a necessity in heavily decorated replicas of the tomb of the Imam and his family are made for Muharram the era of warring tribes. The tradition was maintained even after the advent of Islam, though provisions to accommodate and accept war in special situations, like a threat to the sovereignty of an empire, were introduced. The gory battle of Karbala was fought against this law and tradition of Islam. The inhabitants on the banks of rivers Euphrates and Tigris were traditional rivals. Their animosity was contained to some extent by Muhammad. But when his son-in-law Hazrat Ali was the Caliph(Muslim civil and religious leader considered to be Allah's representative on earth), the old enmity re-surfaced. Hazrat Ali had two descendants, Hazrat Imam Hussain and Hazrat Imam Hassan. Hussain was the ruler of the part of the empire known today as Iran. The other part in modern Iraq was ruled by the Umayyads. Hussain was called upon by the Shiahs of Kufa, a small town in the Umayyad kingdom, to accept their allegiance and claim his place as the leader of the Islamic community. This was against the wishes of the ruler of Kufa, Yazid, who instructed his governor, Ibn-e-Ziad to take appropriate action. Meanwhile, in response to the call of the Shiahs, Hussain accompanied by his family members, headed for Kufa. When they reached Karbala, en route to Kufa, the forces of the governor surrounded them and their 70 men. Hussain, his family and his troops were tortured and killed, and Hussain's head was severed and presented to the king. They received no help from the Shiahs of Kufa. As this tragic incident happened on the tenth day of Muharram, Shia Muslims consider this a day of sorrow. They commemorate the martyrdom of Hussain as a religious occassion called "Muharram" (named after the month of its observance). The occassion starts on the 1st day of Muharram and lasts for 10 days until 10th of Muharram. As Muharram approaches, they put on black clothes, as black is regarded as a color of mourning. During the entire 10 day period, they keep themselves away from music and all joyous events (e.g. weddings) that can distract them in anyway from the sorrowful remembrance of that day. During each of the first nine days of Muharram, "Majalis" (assemblies) are held where Shia orators vividly depict the incident of the martyrdom of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his party. Mainstream Shia Muslims fast until the evening. On "Ashura", devoted Muslims assemble and go out in large processions. They parade the streets holding banners and carrying models of the mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his people, who fell at Karbala. Some Shia sects observe "Ashura" by beating themselves with chains in public, cutting themselves with knives and sharp objects and holding mournful public processions. This is an expression of their grief on the death of their favourite leader Hussain, considered to be the representative of Allah. (But no Shiite scholar affirms any extreme behavior that harms the body and Shia leaders consider such acts as "Haram", or forbidden.) It is a sad occasion and everyone in the procession chants "Ya Hussain", wailing loudly. Generally a white horse is beautifully decorated and included in the procession. It serves to bring back the memory of the empty mount of Hazrat Imam Husain after his martyrdom. Drinking posts are also set up temporarily by the Shia community where water and juices are served to all, free of charge. While Shia Muslims consider "Muharram" to be a sorrowful occassion, Sunni Muslims observe it as a festival and look at "Ashura" as a happy day though the religious aspect remain intact. Pious Sunnis keep a fast("roja") on "Ashura" as per the "Hadith"(a tradition based on reports of the sayings and activities of Muhammad and his companions) of Prophet Muhammad. According to the "Hadith", the Prophet saw the Jews fasting on the 10th of Muharram to commemorate their liberation from Egyptian slavery and the extermination of the army of the Pharoah in the waters of the Red Sea. Prophet Mohammed liked the custom for he believed that it was Allah who saved the Israelites from their enemy in Egypt. He started to fast on the same day as the Jews but he planned to fast on the 9th and 10th from the following year. But death came in between him and his pious wish. Usually, Sunni Muslims are recommended to fast either on the 9th and 10th Muharram or on the 10th and 11th
  22. Dear Brothers and Sisters Salams In the thread titled “Who is Syed B Ali,” in the General Discussions forum, a SC member by the name of “Digital Ummah” has asked for some more information on my book. So I have decided to explain a few things here. As the SC ad says, the book is essentially a response to critics of Islam. If you read some anti-Islam books, of which there has been a deluge in the last 40 years, there are two weapons in the critic's arsenal: Quran- they distort the meanings of the verses and Hadith- where they endlessly quote the same offensive hadiths. I came to realize that I had to do two things for my message to be effective. I had to disavow the common acceptance by our Muslim brothers and sisters of those hadiths and historical accounts, which help critics slander Islam and our Holy Prophet (pbuh). And I had to demonstrate that their arguments were based mainly on malice. But I have not emphasised the word ‘malice.’ Instead, I have given them the benefit of doubt and called it ‘misinformation’. Since I am not a graduate of a hawza school and therefore cannot technically claim to be a scholar, I had to develop my strategy very carefully. And after careful examination of the pros and cons, I decided on the following: Distancing myself from the hadith books that are the cause of so much strife. I have argued that they need to be reviewed and revised. But I have not done this in the very beginning as it may put off some of my non-Shia Muslim readers. Explaining why the Quran is not a literal book. And explain the teachings of Islam in the examples of three of our Imams. Now please let me tell you what the different chapters do: The introductory chapter clearly tells the reader what the book is all about, that being, a response to criticisms of Islam. In chapter I, I have picked two specific anti-Islam books and tried to show how irrationally they arrive at their conclusions. In chapter II, I respond to a specific book that tries to show that Muhammad did not exist and at the same time tries to slander him. Double game! Chapter III is intended to be a rebuttal to atheism. Chapter IV consists of two parts. The first part explains the drift of the Quran without going into the details and the second why it is so difficult to understand it. Chapter V is a thematic collection of verses of the Quran. In chapter VI, I discuss the problems with hadith and history, which critics of Islam so avidly use to slander Islam. Chapter VII – IX show the high ideals of Islam in the example of three of our Imams. Chapter X is the closing chapter following by the Appendices, with some more Islamic teachings. Before you decide to buy, it might be a good idea to go through the preview which is given in the link to the ad I have placed. And should you decide to buy, I would also request you to buy through www.amazon.com. The reason is that if you write a review, which I would very much encourage you to do, Amazon reviews have a very high market effect. If you buy the book through another retailer, you can also write reviews but it does not have the same value as an Amazon review. Please note that I am not asking that you necessarily praise the book in your reviews but I am sure that whatever you write will help counter the effect of negative reviews If you have any questions, I will try to answer them to the best of my ability, for the next few days, after which I will be away for a while. I must again thank brother Ali, for his kind help in creating the ad that you see on the SC home page. It is an exquisite banner and it was indeed very kind of him. Thank you all kindly. Was Salam
  23. In the Holy Islamic world, what is the territory of Islamic Law when a person of a different faith is having a monetary dispute that requires a Judge to determine the fault
  24. The sealing of prophethood has always been regarded as one of the fundamental components of belief in Islam; it negates the possibility of the emergence of any Messenger after the Prophet of Islam. In any discussion of Islam, we cannot overlook the role played in it by the sealing of prophethood with the Prophet Muhammad. What Muslim is there who does not immediately think of the Prophet's aspect as seal whenever he call him to mind, or who has any doubt that the Qur’an is the final revealed message of God? No religion is known to us that like Islam proclaims the sealing of revelation, nor any heavenly personality who has claimed eternal validity for his message. More than fourteen centuries have passed since the rise of Islam, and throughout this period the Prophet of Islam has always been regarded as the Seal of the Prophets. He perfected existing laws, and with the rich content of his own logical and thorough program of action, he demonstrated the ultimate value inherent in all the prophetic missions. By contrast with other schools of religious thought, the validity of which was restricted to a certain time or place, Islam represents a comprehensive summation of all prophetic messages, and it recognizes no boundaries, whether spatial or temporal. The Qur’an itself also depicts the brilliant visage of Muhammad, upon whom be peace and blessings, as the one by means of whom the gate of prophethood has been closed. How can we solve the apparent contradiction between the need for Prophets as the condition for the vitality of human existence, on the one hand, and the permanent sealing of prophethood, on the other? How can we reconcile the principle of the immutability of the ordinances of Islam with the principle of social development and the everlasting search for new concepts and norms? Industrial and technological developments have turned the human being into a creature always desiring novelty, and wishing to connect every aspect of his life to new principles and institutions. How can such a human being organize his social life and development on the basis of a religion that originated more than fourteen centuries ago and summons the human being to recognize a series of fixed and unchanging values? Having expounded the doctrine of the sealing of prophethood, Islam itself provides the answers to these questions. One of the reasons for the sending of new Prophets was the corruptions and distortions that had crept into the teachings and books of their predecessors, with the result that they lost their efficacy in the guidance of the human being. But once the human being reaches a stage in his growth where he can preserve the norms and teachings of religion from corruption or change and propagate them in their authentic form, the most fundamental reason for the sending of new Prophets disappears. The age in which the Prophet of Islam made his appearance thus differs completely from the ages in which earlier Prophets had emerged: the human being had reached a level of intellectual maturity which permitted the sealing of prophethood. The attainment of maturity by society, the rise of science and learning, and the human being's acquisition of the ability to preserve and propagate heavenly religion - all this meant that an essential precondition for the sealing of prophethood had been met. It was now possible for the duty of propagating religion and guiding people to be entrusted to scholars and learned persons. From now on, it was up to the human being to preserve his historical heritage and spiritual achievements and to protect the final revelation from corruption by seeking aid in the Qur’an itself and drawing on his cultural and social maturity. Instead of the responsibility being placed on a single individual, the message was now entrusted to a collectivity. As the Qur’an says: "There should be a group among you who summon to virtue and enjoin good upon them and restrain them from evil." (3:104) In his social development, the human being reaches a stage where he no longer stands in need of repeated surgical intervention and is instead ready for a form of permanent prophethood where human beings shape their own destiny on the basis of clear vision, correct choice and reflection on the contents of revelation. Under such conditions, a social and intellectual order is needed that will free the thoughts and acts of human beings from the wearying and stultifying burden of attachment and give shape and direction to their constant exertions in the realm of both thought and action. The eternal miracle that is the Noble Qur’an sets forth the main principles of such a system by following which human being is able to advance. Among all the heavenly books the Qur’an is the only one to have withstood the ravages of time so that we have in our possession a complete and uncorrupted text clearly reflecting its abundantly creative teachings . The Qur’an itself proclaims: "We it is Who have sent down this Qur’an and We it is Who will protect it." (15:9) This verse indicates that the most important reason for the sending of new Prophets no longer obtains. In addition, we should be aware that belief in all the Prophets signifies belief in a continuous historical process, one which began with history itself and the origins of human society has expressed itself in a struggle between truth and falsehood and will continue until the final triumph of the former over the latter. In each age, the Prophets have advanced the awareness and maturity of human beings in accordance with the circumstances and capacities of society. Differences with respect to certain laws and ordinances do not touch on the fundamental principles and nature of religion because this apparent lack of harmony relates to subsidiary matters, not fundamental concern connected with the very nature of religion. To correct deviations in thought and belief is possible, in fact, only if a variety of programs of action, each congruent with a set of objective realities, are adopted. If an apparent lack of harmony can be observed in the methods followed by the Prophets in the course of their continuous efforts, this has no connection with their fundamental aim. There is no contradiction among their missions with respect to the principal goal - changing and forming anew the thoughts of human beings who had lost touch with reality and were living in darkness, both culturally and socially. The Glorious Qur’an says: "After earlier Prophets, We sent Jesus, son of Mary; he confirmed the Torah brought by Moses." (5:46) https://www.al-islam.org/seal-prophets-and-his-message-sayyid-mujtaba-musavi-lari/lesson-twenty-sealing-prophethood
  25. The Holy Prophet Muhammad (S) is the last of the divine prophets. After His Eminence, no other prophet is going to be sent by God. The Prophet of Islam, from the beginning of his mission, introduced himself as the seal of the prophets and was accepted by the Muslims as such. The subject of finality of prophethood in the Islamic milieu is considered to be an important matter and it is not in need of evidence. Finality is mentioned in the Holy Quran as well as books of traditions. It is mentioned in Quran that: مَا كَانَ مُحَمَّدٌ أَبَآ أَحَدٍ مِّن رِّجَالِكُمْ وَلَكِن رَّسُولَ اللَّهِ وَخَاتَمَ النَّبِيِّينَ وَكَانَ اللَّهُ بِكُلِ‏ّ شَىْ‏ءٍ عَلِيماً “Muhammad is not the father of any of your men, but he is the Apostle of Allah and the Last of the prophets; and Allah is cognizant of all things.” (33:40) If the Arabic word of KH-T-M is recited with vowel ‘I’ on ‘T”, as some reciters have done this, it would imply one who ends something; thus it clearly shows that The Holy Prophet Muhammad (S) is the last of the prophets. But if it is recited with the vowel ‘A’ on ‘T’ it denotes a thing with which something ends. Ring and seal are also called as such, because they are placed at the end of a letter and indicate the end of it. According to the second possibility also, it is concluded from the verse that the Holy Prophet (S) is the last prophet, because he is introduced as a seal, which has come at the end of the letter of prophethood. Therefore, no other prophet is to appear after him. Thus the finality of the Prophet of Islam is nicely concluded from the above verse as the Muslims of the early period of Islam also understood it in this meaning and did not have any doubt in the finality of the prophethood of His Eminence. Other verses also exist in this regard, but there is no need to mention them here. A large number of traditions also exist with regard to finality of prophethood and some of them are mentioned below: Saad Ibn Abi Waqqas has narrated from his father that the Messenger of Allah (S) said to Imam Ali (a.s.): You are to me as Harun was to Musa (a.s.), except that there is no prophet after me.1 The above tradition is known as “the tradition of position” (Hadith Manzila) and is recorded in Shia and Sunni books through various channels and it proves that no other prophet is to come after the Prophet of Islam. It is narrated from Abu Huraira that he said: The Messenger of Allah (S) said: I have been sent for all the people of the world and prophethood has ended with me.2 Abu Amama has narrated from the Holy Prophet (S) that he said: O people, no prophet is to come after me and there is no nation (Ummah) after you. So worship Allah, perform the five daily ritual prayers, observe the fasts of the month of Ramadan, perform the Hajj of Kaaba and pay the Zakat of your wealth, so that your selves are purified. Also obey the ones who are vested with authority among you so that you may enter Paradise.3 Amirul Momineen (a.s.) said: Almighty Allah sent the Holy Prophet (S) at a time when no prophet existed on the earth and there was a time gap between them and discord had developed among the people. Thus by sending him, He ended prophethood and revelation came to an end.4 It is concluded from his tradition and others like it that The Holy Prophet Muhammad (S) is the seal of prophets and that after him no other prophet came and nor any prophet is going to come. It was also stated previously that the Prophet of Islam, at the beginning of his mission, introduced himself as the seal of prophets and all those who accepted his prophethood they also accepted the finality of his prophethood. Therefore no separate evidence is required to prove the finality of the Prophet of Islam 1. Sahih Muslim, Vol. 4, Pg. 1870. 2. At-Tabaqatul Kubra, Vol. 1, Pg. 192. 3. Wasailush Shia, Vol. 1, Pg. 23. 4. Nahjul Balagha, Sermon 129.
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