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Found 973 results

  1. http://www.shiavault.com/ http://www.shiavault.com/books/converts-to-islam/chapters/8-saabirah-abdulhayy Contains shia translated books & story of new converts
  2. Assalamu aleikum, brothers and sisters. I was just wondering if it was haram to enter a church? Not for worshiping reasons, but only because my school is having a field trip day and is visiting a church. Should I stay at home? Thank you.
  3. Why Shias perform Mutah??? Please don't mind sorry to say, isn't it Disgusting??? Men having Muta with different Women and Women having Muta with different men.
  4. Pakistan is Majority Sunni but you can find Shias in Significant number. Since it is believed that Quaid-e-Azam (Founder of Pakistan) was Ismaili Shia. But I see Wahabis and Deobandis are very much in Power. Barelvi is the only Sunni Branch which you can say is Shia Friendly but even Barelvis have lost their Control. Multan (City of Pakistan where I live) is City of Saints and filled with Shrines but people are are now thinking celebrating death anniversiry of Saints is something wastage of time. So SHOCKING point for me is Founder of Pakistan was Shia but today Wahabis are in power. It feels like in some years Pakistan will just be like Saudi Arabia.
  5. (bismillah) Dear brothers and sisters. Lately I have noticed that Shiachat and it's members, including me have changed for the worse. Shiachat in itself is just a website, but it is also the biggest shia community. Granted that it is digital, but in todays day and age, it is equally reflective and mirrors what shias believe and how they behave than it does in physical life. Perhaps even more. However, we are in a bad spot here. I am talking about the behavior and conduct of shiachat members, and their lack of understanding the effects of their words. Both how it affects other shias and how it looks in the eyes of our enemies. I am saying shiachat member, because I myself am a member and take equal part in this act. Some points: 1. Issue: We are constantly criticizing the Ulama. Now this in itself is ok, but everyone knows by now that it has gotten way out of hand. We all have different marjas, and we all have different opinions on their actions. But that does not give us the right to cause turmoil in public. Shiachat, is public, and the worst thing we can do is to show the enemies of AhlulBayt that we have such low opinions about each other. It often turns into personal insults and really bad behavior in the name of criticizing. What this does is create hatred towards each other, and nothing.....NOTHING, pleases the wahabis more than this. I have witnessed now from a discussion that i had with a wahabi that we are in bad shape. He specifically pointed out shiachat, and i had nothing to defend our behavior with. It truly broke my spirit, hence me making this thread. 1. Solution: No matter how the Marjas behave and how much we disagree, we must remember we are in the same camp. Marjas are our generals and we are the soldiers. The generals might disagree, and some generals might misbehave. But that does not give us the right to disrupt the peace between ourselves. The only thing we have in this world is Allah, Ahlulbayt and our brothers and sisters in faith. Let us now focus on creating threads that show the unity we have. Let us create threads that are intellectual and smart in purpose. Let us create posts and threads that promote Shia Islam, not tare it down. This is what discomforts the wahabis and whoever is against the Ahlulbayt. This is what causes their despair and strikes fear in their heart, our strong unity. If we happen to create threads that show sings of getting out of hand, it is the responsibility of every shia to respond with respect and behavior that the Ahlulbayt has taught us. Speak gently, and if someone disagrees, then respond respectfully and with dignity. If someone does go out of hand, let's all join in and stop such behavior. I am certain, that when Imam Mahdi looks upon our behavior as of late, and i am sure he does, he is extremely disappointed. There is nothing wrong with holding back and controlling what you want to say. Let us respect each others marjas and ulama, no matter how much we disagree, and show the world that we stand united regardless. I know it might sound cheesy, but this is the way it should be. If you don't believe in the Marja of your fellow brother or sister, at least believe in the brother or sister themselves and love them mainly because they love AhlulBayt. This is the code of Ziyarat Ashura! 2. Issue: Nationalism! Even though we perhaps never mention the nationality that we have a problem with, the undertone is there. What is this nonsense? Since when did Allah or Ahlulbayt love anyone for their passport and place of birth? It is clear as day that we have issues with nationalities, and sometimes it comes off as a joke, but any sane person that understands linguistics and how it is used, will see that there is a nationalistic tension between members. 2. Solution: Again, it is the responsibility of shia members to stop this. Everyone must join in and firstly correct their on behavior, secondly be smart and noticing such things, and finally speak out in a proper manner about it. 3. Issue: The urge to answer. We can see that sometimes someone creates a thread about Yasser Habib, or Nasrullah, or Shirazis, Khamenei, Hezbollah, Iran, Iraq, etc etc. And we have this urge to show our disgust with the article or case that the thread starter is presenting. 3. Solution: Control your urge as much as you can. You don't have to answer negatively to it every time, there is no purpose to it other than starting a big mess. I am not ordering, i am merely asking in the name of Allah and everything that we hold dear, namely the AhlulBayt whom are dearer to us than our parents and our lives that we start changing. Pitch in and be constructive. Our main enemy is wahabis whom are killing Shias day in and day out, and they laugh and point their dirty fingers at us. This is the platform we can use to do our part in showing that no matter how much we disagree on certain issues, we won't let them have the pleasure of seeing it or taking joy from it. I hope you take this into consideration. Wasalam
  6. This is a nice article about the KSA in the light of history of Islam and current political situation in the region. Saudi Arabia's Great Gamble The detail can be seen at the given link: http://nationalinterest.org/feature/saudi-arabias-great-gamble-23348 wasalam Comments on it are welcome.
  7. The following are the few glimpse about the life education and religious work of Sayed Ammar Nakshawani 1. Birth: 1981 2. Family background: - He is the grandson of Murtadha Nakshawani, (who served as a representative of GrandAyatollah Abu al-Qasim al-Khoei in the holy city of Najaf in Iraq. In 1987) his family migrated to England, United Kingdom - He is a direct descendant of Muhammad SAAW through Musa al-Kadhim, the seventh Twelver Shia Imam. - He is also the nephew of Sheikh Baqir al-Irawani, one of the highest ranking Shiite jurists of the 21st century 3. Education: - BSc in Psychology and Law in 2003 – University of London - MA from Shahid Beheshti University in Tehran - Phd from University of Exeter – England Religious studies: - Studied in the Islamic Seminaries of Damascus, Syria in the precincts of the sanctuary of Zainab, the granddaughter of Holy Prophet Muhammad, from 2009 – 2012 - Studies include Arabic Grammar, Hadith Studies, Logic, Science of Jurisprudence, History, Theology, Mysticism and Quranic Sciences - These subjects included the study of works of classical scholars such as Ibn Aqil, Rumi, Sibawayh, Baladhuri, Tabari, Ibn al-Athir, Masudi, Yaqubi, Baqillani, Qadi Numan, Sijistani, Ibn Arabi, Allama al-Hilli, Sheikh al-Mufid, Nasir al-Din al-Tusi, Shahid al-Awwal and Shahid al-Thani, Sharif al-Murtadha and Sharif al-Radhi, Suyuti, Ibn Taymiyyah, Ibn Qayyim al–Jawziyya, Dhahabi, Kashi, Najashi as well as contemporary scholars such as Sadr, Sobhani, Yazdi, Abdul Hadi al-Fadhli, Taleqani, Beheshti, Khoei, Mutaharri, Shariati, Muzaffar as well as his uncle Baqir al- Irawani. 4. Teachers: He studied under Ayatollah Milani, Sheikh Bahmanpour, Sheikh Elmi, Sheikh Vaezi, Dr Toussi, Sheikh Ahmed Qabalan, Sayed Alaa al Halabi, Sheikh Mukhtar al-Tunisi, and Prof Ezzati. According to a license posted on his website, he holds the intermediate scholarly rank of Hujjat al-Islam. 5. Occupation: Professor 6. Titles: - He serves as the Imam Ali Chair of Shia studies at Hartford Seminary, the oldest seminary in the United States, and is the first ever academic chair in the United States devoted to the study of Shi'ism. - He serves as the Special Representative to the United Nations for the Universal Muslim Association of America (UMAA). In this role, he promotes women's rights initiatives, social development, and religious tolerance. Nakshawani uses this position to speak out for the preservation of cultural heritage, historical art and architecture, and ancient literature. As Special Representative, he engages in interfaith dialogue with leaders of a variety of faith communities, and advocates on behalf of Islam - He is a member of the International Qurʾanic Studies Association. 7. Important Events: - 500 Most Influential Muslims: In 2014, Nakshawani was included in the list of The 500 Most Influential Muslims (also known as The Muslim 500, an annual publication first published in 2009) in the "Preachers and Spiritual Guides" section. - Prolific Islamic Scholar: A 2009 report by the Change Institute said that at the age of 27, Nakshawani represented the arrival of a new generation of persuasive and articulate Muslim intellectuals and personalities who are able to gain leverage amongst young Muslim audiences because they speak in a language that appeals to them...an increasingly significant figure amongst Shi'a youth both in the UK and internationally. 8. Initiatives: Sayed Ammar continues to promote a contemporary understanding of Islam and dispelling myths about Shi'ism through interfaith and intrafaith initiatives under the mentorship of leading scholars in the Muslim World. He travels frequently to Iraq to consult with scholars including Ayatollahs Ali al-Sistani and Bashir al-Najafi, and others. His uncle Mohammad Jawad al-Irawani sits on Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's Expediency Discernment Council. He also routinely convenes with al-Sistani's representative Sheikh Fadhel al-Sahlani, in New York City. Sayed Ammar has appeared on news media including TV channels such as the BBC, Ahlulbayt TV, Press TV, Al Zahra, Al Anwar, Kerbala TV, Hidayat, Wilayat, Ahlebayt and Safeer TV. 9. Shia Sunni Unity at Columbia University The "Muslim Student Association of Columbia University". Archived from the original on 18 May 2012. held a lecture by Sayed Ammar Nakshawani on the importance of uniting Sunni and Shia Muslims. “There needs to be dialogue in order to bridge the gap,” Nakshawani said in his lecture. “For so many years, when Shiites and Sunnis tried to bridge the gap, the Shiite would look through his lens. The Sunni would look through his.” In his address, Nakshawani asked the audience to put aside political and theological differences between Sunnis and Shiites and focus on the group’s shared fundamental beliefs, such as the oneness of Allah, Muhammad’s role as the prophet of Allah, and the five pillars of Islam. "Take off your lenses and see through the eyes of someone else," Nakshawani said. He criticized he speeches of Sunni and Shiite clerics who use phrases such as "atheist sinners" and "infidels" to incite hatred of other sects. 10. Lectures: Muharram Lecture Circuit and Ramadhan Lecture Circuit, These are arranged on yearly basis 11. Website: www.sayedammar.com https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammar_Nakshawani
  8. Miqdād b. ʿAmr (Arabic: مقداد بن عمرو), known as Miqdad b. al-Aswad (Arabic: مقداد بن الأسود), · A Noble companion of the Prophet (s), and one of the first Shi'as of Imam Ali (a) · Miqdad converted to Islam early after Bi'that and was one of the first people who revealed his conversion to Islam. He attended all battles in the early years of Islam · Miqdad, Salman al-Farsi, 'Ammar b. Yasir, and Abu Dhar are referred to as the first Shi'as (followers) of Imam Ali (a); they were known as Shi'as even in the period of the Prophet (s). · After the demise of the Prophet (s), Miqdad supported Imam Ali's (a) immediate succession of the Prophet (s), and did not pledge his allegiance to Abu Bakr b. Abi Quhafa · He was one of the few people who were present at the funeral of Fatima al-Zahra (a). · Miqdad is praised in hadiths from Ahl al-Bayt (a) in which he is said to return in Raj'a after the Reappearance of Imam al-Mahdi (a). He transmitted hadiths from the Prophet (s). · Several titles like al-Bahra'i, al-Bahrawi, al-Kindi, and al-Hadhrami and kunays such as Abu Ma'bad, Abu Sa'id, and Abu l-Aswad are reported for him Family Wife: Miqdad's wife was Duba'a, the Prophet's (s) cousin and Zubayr b. 'Abd al-Muttalib's daughter. The Prophet (s) married Duba'a to Miqdad although he considered her as having a great prestige and lineage. Children: Miqdad had two children called 'Abd Allah and Karima. 'Abd Allah was a supporter of Aisha in the Battle of Jamal, fought against Imam Ali (a), and was killed in that battle Immigration Miqdad emigrated two times: once to Abyssinia among the third group of Muslim immigrants, and once again to Medina. (he joined Muslims in 1 AH/623 in Shawwal in the Sariyya of Abu 'Ubayda) Presence in Battles Miqdad attended all the battles of the Prophet (s) Supporting the Succession of Imam Ali (a) After the demise of the Prophet (s) and the selection of Abu Bakr b. Abi Quhafa as the caliph and successor of the Prophet (s), a few Muslims stayed loyal to Ali (a) and did not pledge their allegiance to Abu Bakr, including Salman, Abu Dhar, and Miqdad. Miqdad was not present in the Event of Saqifa. According to some sources, he was a member of Shurtat al-Khamis. (Shurṭat al-Khamīs (Arabic: شرطة الخمیس) was a group of devoted fighters at the time of Imam 'Ali (a) who had dedicated their lives to support that Imam (a)). http://en.wikishia.net/view/Shurtat_al-Khamis On different occasions, Miqdad reminded Abu Bakr and his companions of the issues of Imam Ali's (a) succession of the Prophet (s) and took actions to clarify the matter. Here are some examples of Miqdad's activities in defense of Ali's (a) right to the caliphate: 1. When people pledged their allegiance to Abu Bakr, a group of Muhajirun and Ansar, including Miqdad, refused to pledge their allegiance to him and joined Ali b. Abi Talib (a). 2. Forty men went to Imam Ali (a) and said: "we are ready to defend and support you." The Imam (a) told them: "if you are steadfast in your pledge, then shave your heads and come back to me tomorrow." The next day it was only Salman, Miqdad, and Abu Dhar who had shaved their heads and gone to Imam Ali (a). 3. In the story of the Six-Member Council for the selection of the caliph after 'Umar b. al-Khattab, 'Abd al-Rahman b. 'Awf told Ali (a): "I will pledge my allegiance to you if you follow the Book of God [i.e. the Qur'an], the Prophet's (s) tradition, and the practice of Abu Bakr" but Ali (a) accepted only the first two conditions. Miqdad objected to 'Abd al-Rahman: "I swear to God, you have left Ali (a) who adjudicated on the basis of truth and justice". He went on: "I saw no household so oppressed as Ahl al-Bayt (a) after the demise of the Prophet (s)". Miqdad opposed 'Uthman b. 'Affan's caliphate. He expressed his opposition by delivering a speech in the Mosque of Medina. Miqdad in the Heaven: According to a hadith from Anas b. Malik, one day the Prophet (s) said: "the Heaven aspires to four of my people. When Ali (a) asked him about those people, the Prophet said: "I swear to God that you are the first of those people. The rest are Miqdad, Salman, and Abu Dhar." Also in an exegesis of the Quranic verse, "Surely (as for) those who believe and do good deeds, their place of entertainment shall be the gardens of paradise" (Sura al-Kahf: 107), Imam al-Sadiq (a) said: "this verse was revealed about Abu Dhar, Miqdad, Salman, and 'Ammar".[ Acting upon al-Mawadda Verse: Imam al-Sadiq said about al-Mawadda Verse ("I ask of you no wage except the love of near relatives"): "I swear to God that nobody acted upon the verse except seven people, including Miqdad." Miqdad's Raj'a: According to some hadiths, Miqdad will return to the world after the Reappearance of Imam al-Mahdi (a) and will be a companion and commander of the Imam's (a) government." Death and Burial Place Late in his life, Miqdad resided in "Jurf" (an area one parasang away from Medina towards Syira), and died in 33/654 at the age of 70. The Muslims took his corpse to Medina. Uthman b. 'Affan said the Funeral Prayer for him, and he was buried in al-Baqi' cemetery http://en.wikishia.net/view/Miqdad_b._'Amr
  9. Ali bin Yaqteen: (The Companion of Imam Musa Al-kazim AS) Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Yaqteen ibn Musa al-Baghdadi (742–798 AD/ /124-182 A.H) (ابوالحسن علی بن یقطین بن موسی البغدادی) · He was a close companion of Imam Musa al-Kadhim, a Shia narrator, and jurist,. · He was born in Kufa and lived in Baghdad. · He was a reliable minister of Abbasid Caliphate, however he kept his faith hidden and used his position in the government administration to support the Shia who were usually oppressed during the Abbasid reign. · He compiled 3 books. · His father, Yaqteen ibn Musa, was one of the supporters of Imam Ja'far al-Sadiq, he was placed under an arrest warrant by Marwan I. He was forced to escape and hide · Ali ibn Yaqteen’s mother took him and his brother, Ubayd, to Medina · Later on, he moved to Baghdad and started working as a spice seller. After the fall of the Umayyad Caliphate and emergence of Abbasid Caliphate, Ali ibn Yaqteen returned to Kufa and entered the Abbasid administration. · In the long run, he became a minister of Harun al-Rashid · Undoubtedly he was a Shia; but he hid his belief from Abbasid Caliphs all the time as his father did. He was a close student and companion to Musa al-Kadhim and acted as Musa al-Kadhim’s secret agent in the palace of Harun al-Rashid. Many Hadiths have been narrated from him in The Four Books According to some historical evidence that have been gave credence by Shia scholars, he entered the Abbasid government by the approval and guidance of Musa al-Kadhim in order to support the oppressed people and particularly assist the Shia In biographical evaluation sources, three books have been mentioned for him: Masa’il anhu al-Sadiq min al-Malahim (about the future events and occurrence) Al-Shakk bi hadratih-I (about a disputation between a doubting Thomas and Ja'far al-Sadiq) Masa’il ‘an Abi al-Hasan Musa ibn Ja’far (contains the hadiths that he had heard form Musa al-Kadhim or Imam’s answers to his questions In 798 Ali ibn Yaqteen died in Baghdad while Musa al-Kadhim was imprisoned by Harun al-Rashid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_ibn_Yaqteen Isma‘il b. Musa has said: “I heard the righteous servant (Musa) say on al-Safa (Mountain): “My Lord, (O You Who are) in the Highest Place, forgive ‘Ali b. Yaqteen!” And Imam Musa has said: “ Of the happiness of ‘Ali b. Yaqteen is that I remembered him in the Standing-place (of ‘Arafa).” These examples indicate that Imam Musa harbored love and loyalty to ‘Ali b. Yaqteen. Without doubt the Imam was sincere to him, for he was a wonderful example of piety, righteousness, and ideals. http://www.aldhiaa.com/english/book/book/holy_prophet_and_ahlul_bayt_library/imam_al_kadhum/the_life_of_imam_musa_bin_jafar_al_kazim/037.html
  10. Sunnis...why do you hate us and call us rawafidh? Shias.....why is it so important to prove Sunnis wrong and classify Aisha, Abu Bakr, Umar and Uthman as our enemies...? Per my understanding, Imam Ali (as) was never hostile towards Aisha even after the Battle of the Camel and he wasn't hostile towards Abu Bakr and Umar either to avoid dividing muslims. Isn't there an important lesson to take from that? Can't we just agree to disagree? Can't us Shias just continue following the message of the Prophet (pbuh) through ahlulbayt and Sunnis continue to follow Prophet's message through Abu Bakr and Umar... Sunnis...why do you hate us SOO MUCH just because we love ahlulbayt? When will Shias stop getting killed in the Middle East because of this? Will we ever live in peace as muslim brothers and sisters?
  11. Assalamaleikum So im actually dealing with two huge problems which is very difficult for me to solve! i need your advices guys! Bear with me it is not a short one! and please dont judge me:)! 1) : I (shia girl) have been dating this guy ( sunni muslim) for almost 1 and a half year (we met at our college). to start with i know it is haram and not really acceptable in islam to date but since i met him i felt like he is the one and we wanted to take our relation further. we talked about that he should come and ask for my hand. we were both agreeing in that one since we thought thats the best thing to do as we both are muslims and should do it in a halal way. Later when i got to know him much better, i felt like he is getting a bit overprotective and started to control me whenever i was out with my girl-friends or if i went to parties with my family and friends. He wouldn't really let me go out with my friends sometimes and if i were then suddenly he would show up! He sometimes checked my phone, checked my messages and Instagram snapchat etc!, and were telling me with whom i can talk to or with whom i can hang around with. And whenever i was at home replying his messages a bit late he would get angry or upset at me, and he knew that my family would b around thats why i couldn't reply to his calls and messages at time!. and then i told him that i want to study nursery and that was also a thing that was bothering him so he told me not to study it. And choose something else. But i disagreed cause thats my dream and thats what i want to do. Later on i tried to convince him which took me over a week ( he actually said if i choose nursery then he would leave me) and then he finally agreed that i could study nursery! after 6-7 months i didn't see any change in him. He kept doing all those things again and again i actually deleted some of my good friends because of him, which are small things i know. And when he told me to delete them etc it didn't bother me because i knew i loved him and i did what he told me to do. And sometimes when he didn't allow me to go out with friends or bday parties i would listen to him and just sit at home. all these things that i had to do for him and the pressure and controlling thing he did with me were beyond my limits, i felt like i was not happy and was forced to do things which i wasn't happy to do. I couldn't really be myself when i was with him, so sometimes i did hide things which i didn't want to tell or show him because i knew he wouldn't understand. and since i come from a family where i have my own freedom and limits/boundaries/rules that my parents had sat for me i was happy with that and my parents would never force me to do something i won't. And of course because they TRUST me no matter what. almost 9-10 months passed and i felt sad inside, upset, disappointed, weak, unhappy, guilty ( which he made me feel sometimes) i felt like i did a huge mistake by trusting in him and be with him behind my parents's back. I was thinking with myself is he really the one? can i be happy with him? will HE be happy with me? so i decided to talk to him tell him everything what i felt and my thoughts. SO I finally decided to break up with him cause i felt helpless, hopeless, tired and not happy and couldn't continue being with him! Then he started crying, came to my house every time with red roses tried to convince me to give him another chance. He was shedding tears every time he came to my door, So i started to feel so bad for him and for us! i said maybe im wrong i felt guilty somehow to see him crying and so helpless! so i gave him another chance i gave US another chance because i did still love him. He said then he will come to ask for my hand so that we could get engaged. And that was also a thing which made me feel like getting engaged with him will maybe solve our problems somehow! Before asking for my hand i told my dad about him told him everything the truth! no lies! my father looked at me and where really upset that why did i even date this guy such a long time and especially when he is a SUNNI MUSLIM! my dad were against it and told me to break our relation and not even think about it for a second! He said there a so many differences between a sunni and shia, and that our differences will come in our way some day when we get married it will be a huge problem. I told my bf everything and he said it doesn't matter that won't stop him to come and talk with my father. So he actually came and talked with my father. Tried to convince him by saying that he loves me and we know each other for a long time now and he will keep me happy etc etc, but since his family doesn't live here in the same country he came alone to ask for my hand. My dad literally threw him out without even yelling or anything. He told him that we have been doing a huge sin for dating such a long time, and the second thing is that he is a sunni muslim. These two things stood in our way otherwise my dad would accept him no matter what. After that i tried to talk with my father about all this and told him these things aren't that much important for me because i see goodness in him ( even tho is a possessive and wants to control) and he is a really nice guy, he respects the elder, he has good manners and helps his family when they are in need ( money problem) and he does work, he studies.. and he loves me alot since he also came to talk with my father. Means that he is serious about us!? but when i couldn't convince my father i lost hopes and actually saw a point in his speech about the sunni-shia thing. So i told my bf that maybe its better if we just break up. My father he won't accept him and the other thing which i had on ma mind was the way he is being so possessive and overprotective can i really be happy with him? and what about our children in the future.. what will they follow my belief or his? Will i commit a huge sin if my children chooses to follow his path ? Still he didn't give up, but i already gave up everything. I was so damn confused and lost that i didn't want to go back to him. He was kinda suffering and got sick for a few months because i didn't talk to him and started to ignore him. But now i feel soo bad and guilty i never really wanted to hurt him, but i somehow had to give up i had no other choice. i really love him and i know he will be a good husband if he just changes a few bad habits and starts to behave manly and not childish. With the guiltiness i had felt and not happy for leaving him then i decided to give him another chance to see maybe it will work out between us and maybe my father will accept him even tho he is a sunni muslim. And try to look at what good qualities do he have instead of looking at him as a sunni muslim! I talked with my father few days ago i thought maybe i can convince him but he still has the same opinion and my bf still is a bit possessive about most of the things even now. Thought maybe he is changed but no.. So what should i do??? Forget my fathers decision and his advices etc and get married with him with hope that he will change his bad habits towards me and that he won't try to change my belief or force my childrens to follow his path in the future, or should i really listen to what my father says and leave my bf for the very last time? Please help... i need your advices/Suggestions JazakAllah
  12. I am a shia girl and I have been very close to a sunni man for about 4 years now. We share an amazing bond together. He’s everything I have ever wanted in a husband. But I’m an Indian and he’s a pakistani and also he’s sunni and I’m shia which is the biggest issue here when it comes to our marriage. His family has agreed for this proposal and in my family everybody agrees but we are too afraid to inform my father as he disaproves marriages of such kind. If anyone can please help me out to give me a dua that can melt My father’s heart for this proposal. I’ll be very thankful to you and will always remember you in prayers. thank you
  13. Salamo Aleikum brothers and sisters! I hope everything is well with all of you. I was just wondering if anyone has had any experience with this site: http://mecollectibles.com/en/236-prayer-rug. I was looking to buy some prayer rugs and some other things and came across this site. Does anyone know of it?
  14. Guest

    Halal and Non-Halal Food

    Assalam u Alaikum, I am Akram from Canada. It's been a month since I started my research on halal and non-halal food. I am writing an article on this topic and for which I am gathering Hadith from both Shia and Sunni Muslims. It would be a great help if you provide me with Quranic Evidence, Hadith, and Rulings from Ayatollah(s). JazakAllah Kher,
  15. Hi everyone, I was wondering if theres any proof from Quran or hadiths or any arguement that i could against a sunni brother to prove that (as) is not only for prophets.
  16. Salaaam Alaykum, So I have a SoundCloud for my fav latmiyah for Farsi, Arabic and Urdu. InshaAllah i might even go for a premium account in the future and let me know how they are For Arabic and Farsi - click below For Urdu - click below THANK YOU AND TAKE CARE YA'LL
  17. Alaikum Salaam Brothers And Sisters, Allah's Blessings Be Upon You All!! So I'm Hoping I Can Be Directed To A Online Store That Sells Shia PrayerMats? I Appreciate Any And All Assistance! Alaikum Salaam! Allahumma Salli Ala Muhammad Wa Ala Ali Muhammad!!
  18. Alhamdulilah, I was granted an opportunity to study in the West (in Canada specifically) and it will be the first time I will be on my own for an extended period. So I have been reading up on the region I will be staying in,especially on how Muslims are treated there and if there is any xenophobia or islamophobia(I will be a visible minority since I wear a hijab and I found myself falling down in the rabbit hole and reading horror stories on violent attacks, murders,assaults and prejudice in the street and in the work environment. This search was not limited to my future area but encompassed almost every western country. From my uneducated opinion based on reading articles on the incidents I found three major types of incidents: The first is when a crazy psychopathic terrorist attacks a mosque or a gathering of Muslims (yes I decided to label them terrorists because for me a terrorist is someone who wants to kill you and torture you and justifies and rationalizes it by whatever "code" or "reason" he follows). I noticed in almost every case that that was the last straw in a long line of verbal and minor (compared to a mass shooting) attacks on the same community. For example a week before the attack on the Canadian mosque the same terrorist left a pig's head and blood on their doorstep. Think about it, violence is a process especially extreme violence. It does not start from nowhere. Its build up bit by bit. It starts by racist and islamophobic posts on social media (In every incident I read about the terrorist was quite open and unapologetic about his islamophobic views on social media )which are encouraged by the media and his own community. And then the next time he meets an identifiable acceptable target i.e most likely a woman wearing a hijab he will permit himself more leeway and overstep his bounds. Which brings us to the second type of incident :Where the terrorist knows an "identifiable acceptable target"/potential victim in his daily life. For example a neighbor or a colleague at work.The gradual attacks are even more evident in these cases since before the most likely lethal final outcome there will be an almost constant harassment and bullying. And then I found the third type of incident :where the victim doesn't know the perpetrator and is blindsided by the attack. According to one article and my own humble opinion (I resorted to articles because I havent found a survey or statistics on the attack's pattern from the muslim community) the attacker is most likely but not always a young adult white male and the victim is a young woman wearing a hijab.Also the attacks most likely happens in a fringe zone i.e a place of transit like a public transportation station or a parking space or a less frequented side street. As for the time I am sure there is a direct correlation between a surge of attacks on Muslims of the west and terrorist attacks by daesh in the west. Now logically speaking I realize I was being a little paranoid and that there wasn't a witch hunt going on unbeknownst to the rest of the Muslim world but there must be a basis of truth in this phenomenon. If so dear Muslims of the west if you would be so kind to answer my questions (also any feedback and criticism is welcome as I said this is my uneducated humble opinion) Jazekha Allah: -How does it affect you in your daily life ? Are you being prejudiced against in your work environment (especially if you wear a hijab)? Is the issue being addressed in the shia community of the west ? Have they found out a way to teach you on how to disengage or even better how to avoid and prevent it from happening as in schooling you on how to be vigilant and the telltale signs and the ideal situation for attacks to happen? Is there something specific for our kid's safety ? Is there a legal framework by Muslims and for Muslims to deal with prejudice and the aftermath of attacks ? Also Do you have any advice for someone in my situation and any feedback is welcome. Rahmatou Allah for all those who lost their lives in these incidents and I do believe we should honor them by working toward preventing them.
  19. Salaam, I just wanted to ask this question, seeing as how those muslims of the liberal persuasions love to invoke the bandwagon of "mansplaining". However, for a decent number of reasons I can see why there is no such thing as "mansplaining" in Islam. However, I would like input from you guys and gals on this issue and whether mansplaining is legitimate to any extent theologically, in a historical and contemporary orthodox sense. I appreciate input from both Sunnis and Shia's on this matter, as this issue does cross into both sects and I am curious about what Sunni Orthodoxy has to say on the matter of "mansplaining". Also I do appreciate input from both Christians and Jews on this topic as well. Though I do want to see an orthodox vantage point of "mansplaining" from Christianity and Judaism. Also, advice from those who are nonreligious or atheists/agnostics is also appreciated.
  20. Assalamu Alaikum brothers and sisters, I am muhammad the son of the leader of the true shia severs who believe that imam Isma'il (AS) is really the final mahadi(Syed yahya Burhanudeen, we did not believe in any one who claim to be imam after our seven imam (imam Isma'il AS). i am looking for brothers and sisters globally. please you can send me your email so that we can chat more. wassalam.
  21. In Malaysia the country of diversity Shia Islam is banned by Saudi Dolars http://en.mehrnews.com/news/116422/Malaysia-hard-place-for-Shia-Muslims http://jakartaglobe.id/archive/in-malaysia-shiite-muslims-must-practice-faith-in-secret/ http://www.mei.edu/content/map/malaysia-and-its-shi‘-“problem” http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/two-iraqi-islamic-state-commanders-among-19-men-arrested-in-9187754
  22. I'm wearing a zard aqeeq and a taveez is written on its back side. One day i was going for an interview and i was pretty much tensed, during that moment the aqeeq started to turn black. What's the reason? Is it a good sign or a bad one?
  23. Dear brothers and sisters, assalamu alaykum wa rahmatullah. This is my first post here. I am glad to join "ShiaChat" and I hope this forum will help me learn and understand more about the teachings of the Noble Prophet and his ahlul-bayt, peace be upon them. My first question pertains to homosexuality. My question is not whether or not homosexual acts are haram. I am aware that homosexual acts are unambiguously forbidden in Islam; as the Quran and the ahadith (from both Sunni and Shia sources) condemn homosexual acts in very clear terms. My question is: As Muslims, and more particularly as Shia Muslims, how should we understand homosexuality? Scientific research shows that people who are attracted to the same sex develop their orientation before their born. In other words, homosexuality (I am talking about the tendency and the inclination, and not the act) is not a choice, but a destiny. Is science right in saying this? If science isn't right, where is the counter-evidence? If science is right, and homosexuality is indeed a sexual orientation, why is it not treated as such in our sacred books? My impression is that the Quran and the ahadith mention sodomy as a sinful action but make no reference to homosexuality as a sexual orientation or a complete identity. The whole concept of sexual orientation seems to absent from our scriptures and religious literature. Furthermore, if we accept the scientific research (which we must accept unless conclusive counter-evidence is provided), how does this cohere with God's Justice and Mercy? Why would Allah, who is both Merciful and Just, place homosexual desires in the hearts of some of His servants; and then punish them for acting on those desires, and condemn them to a loveless life? By contrast, sexual desire directed towards the opposite sex can be halalified much more easily (through permanent marriages, and in the context of Shia Islam, temporary marriages). Lastly, in your opinion, what would be the best way to explain the Islamic stance on homosexuality, and the reason acts of sodomy were made haram, to a non-Muslim and non-religious person, on purely rational grounds and without reference to scripture? Many thanks for reading. I'll await your replies. JazakumuLlahu khayran.
  24. are there any albanian shias?
  25. So I have been wondering, why carve the name of Hussayn A.S and not just Allah SWT?
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