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Found 49 results

  1. Iran commiserates with Saudis on king’s passingHomeFri Jan 23, 2015 8:57AMA view of the building of Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs Iran has extended condolences to the Saudi government and nation on the passing of the country's King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. Iranian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham condoled with Saudis on the monarch's demise, saying Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif will, on behalf of the Tehran government, attend an official memorial service due to be held in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, on Saturday. Meanwhile, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani also extended condolences to the Saudi government and people on the monarch’s demise. King Abdullah died at the age of 90 on Friday and his 79-year-old half brother, Salman, succeeded him. The king reportedly died at hospital, where he had been receiving medical treatment for several weeks. King Abdullah, who was admitted to the King Abdulaziz Medical City in the capital Riyadh in late December, had been suffering from pneumonia and was reportedly breathing with the help of a tube. The Saudi king’s death has raised concerns about the future of the oil-rich country in the face of anti-government demonstrations. Salman was named Saudi crown prince in June 2012 after the death of Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz. Salman has recently represented King Abdullah at most public events because of the monarch's ailing health. Salman bin Abdulaziz, the new king, will also serve as prime minister and defense minister in the Arab state. But the 79-year-old is reportedly in poor health and is unlikely to rule for as long as his elder sibling. http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2015/01/23/394394/Iran-condoles-with-KSA-on-kings-demise
  2. Half-masting of flags following the death of King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz, King of Saudi Arabia Half-masting instructions It is with great regret that we learn of the death of the King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz, King of Saudi Arabia. It is requested that all flags be half-masted from 8am today until 8pm this evening. Any other UK national flags flown alongside the Union Flag when it is at half-mast should also be at half-mast. If a flag of a foreign nation is normally flown on the same stand as the Union Flag, it should be removed. Local authorities are not bound by this request but may wish to follow it for guidance. Devolved administrations are responsible for issuing instructions for the flying of the Union Flag on buildings in their estate and others as necessary. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/half-masting-of-flags-following-the-death-of-king-abdullah-bin-abdulaziz-king-of-saudi-arabia لعنة الله على الظالمين
  3. (bismillah) (salam) - Sudan has closed all Iranian cultural centres in the country and expelled the cultural attache and other diplomats, a government source has said, without giving an explanation for the move. - Khartoum closes cultural centres and gives Iran's diplomats 72 hours to get out. http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2014/09/sudan-orders-iranian-diplomats-leave-201492141938226714.html http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/02/sudan-expels-iranian-diplomats-closes-cultural-centres Iran has Shia cultural centers all over the Sunni Majority countries but the Iranian Sunnis are not allowed operate in major Shia cities in Iran let alone the foreigners, they are not even allowed to have a proper Mosque in Tehran. The thing that caught my attention was the reaction of Iranian Sunnis, I am quoting from their facebook page:
  4. The new face of the same old bigotry and old-style, crude discrimination. So when are these Saudi mullahs and their minions issuing fatwas of kufr and fisq against the Saudi regime for instituting un-Islamic laws? Or do those fatwas only come when mullahs need to give licence to old men to marry children or acquire multiple wives?
  5. http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x20pqhi_saudi-wahabi-mulla-says-prophet-muhammad-saws-sold-alcohol-to-sahaba_news http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x20pqhi_saudi-wahabi-mulla-says-prophet-muhammad-saws-sold-alcohol-to-sahaba_news
  6. Less than two days after it was posted, No Woman, No Drive has had more than three million views on YouTube. It's the most popular YouTube video in Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries, and has been a big hit around the world from South Africa to Denmark to Canada. "Insanity" is the word 26-year-old comedian Hisham Fageeh uses to describe the way his video has taken off. "For two days my brain has been on fire - I can't wrap my brain around what is happening," he told the BBC. It's a satirical video set to the tune of Bob Marley's No Woman, No Cry, with the words changed to focus on driving. It was put together by Fageeh and colleagues at the production house Telfaz11, which specialises in making comedy for an online audience. In short, they wanted it to go viral.
  7. Last 12 Months Shia-Sunni-Christian-Hindu Killings in PAKISTAN September 18, 2012 - Eight people were killed, over two dozen injured in twin bomb blasts at Dawoodi Bohra Community in Karachi. November 3, 2012 - The Phandu baba Sufi shrine at Chamkani, near Peshawar, was bombed and partially destroyed. No causalities. November 24, 2012 - The shrine of an 11th century Sufi saint, Ali Mardan Shah, was blown up in the Takhtbhai tehsil of Mardan, K-P. January 10, 2013 - 4 bombings in Quetta and Swat killed over a hundred and injured an estimated 270. Area predominantly Shia Muslim. LeJ took responsibility. February 1, 2013 - A suicide blast killed 19 people, wounded 45 in a market targeting Shias outside a mosque in Hangu. The death toll was reported above 20. February 25, 2013 - Three people were killed, 27 others injured in a bomb attack at Sufi shrine, Dargah Ghulam Shah Ghazi, in the village of Maari near Shikarpur. February 20, 2013 - A roadside bomb hit the caravan of Syed Ghulam Hussain Shah, a renowned Barelvi cleric of Qambar Shahdadkot, killing one person and injuring several others. March 3, 2013 - Twin blasts occurred in the Shia-dominated Abbas Town, Karachi, which left at least 40 dead and over 135 injured. March 9, 2013 - At least four people were killed, 27 were injured in a blast during Zuhr prayer inside Jamia Chishtia mosque, near Meena Bazaar in Peshawar May 3, 2013 - At least 13 people were killed in twin bomb attacks that targeted two mosques in north-western Malakand region. June 20, 2013 - A suicide bomber blew himself up at Hussaini Madrassa in Peshawar, killing 15 people and leaving 22 injured. July 11, 2013 - Two people were killed and seven injured when explosives rigged to a motorcycle went off outside a mosque frequented by both Sunni and Shia worshippers in Kohat, K-P This doesn't even count 10-12 Shia Muslims executed daily in Karachi, Pakistan. P.S. I posted it in Imam Mahdi forum because Shi Chat doesn't has a special place to cover Pakistan Shia Violence. SC does has separate threads for Shia Violence in Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Syria etc. Source: http://tribune.com.pk/story/607981/and-then-they-were-gone/
  8. http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=298_1367335081 In the Sunnah of Khalid bin Walid - the rapists, his followers are raping these women of media, incidentally Al Jazeera is the same media which is helping them squarely. Imagine what would they be doing to helpless women and girls of Syrian towns under their control!!! ----------------------–-----–------------------------------------ A female Al Jazeera correspondent, who is covering the terrorist activities from different cities in Syria for months, was quickly moved to Qatar, after one of the commanders of Al Nusra Front, Al-Qaeda affiliated terrorist group, raped her in Aleppo. Egyptian daily Al-Nahar reported that Ghada Oweis, Al Jazeera correspondent, has long been working alongside terrorist groups opposed to Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo to send reports to Qatari network. A few days ago on the invitation of one of the commanders of this Salafist group, she went to his office. Surprisingly however, the Al-Nusra militias did not allow her camera crews to enter the office. And they took Ms. Oweis by force and told the crews to come back for interview tomorrow. Al Jazeera correspondent was rushed out of Syria via Turkey, when it was discovered she was raped by the commander of Al-Nusra Front in Aleppo. She was transferred to Qatar later, she is emotionally in shock. Returning to Qatar, Ghada Oweis demanded justice and asked the senior leaders of Al-Nusra group to punish this commander. Reportedly Al Jazeera is trying to prevent the reporter from affirming the news by ways of pressure and payments of huge amount of money to maintain the good image of the terrorists fighting in Syria. The terrorist militias in Syria have been committing numerous acts of violence and shameless atrocities against the civilians, by using a Fatwa; issued by one of the Muftis of Salafists, that militias fighting in Syria can force women to ‘Jihad al Nikah’ (Girls must participate in "marriage" to fulfill their Jihad obligations in Syria). Read more at http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=298_1367335081#KomkqttbUOK9OcY0.99
  9. New evidence emerging from recently captured areas from where saudi funded FSA Salafis/Wahabis are on the run. Victorious SAA personnel found corpses of young women and children which were raped by Al-Nusra members after they were killed.
  10. Only in Saudi Arabia... http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2310526/Three-men-deported-Saudi-Arabia-irresistible-women.html It's just too comical.
  11. Isolation of a Novel Coronavirus from a Man with Pneumonia in Saudi Arabia October 17, 2012DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1211721 A 60-year-old Saudi man was admitted to a private hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on June 13, 2012, with a 7-day history of fever, cough, expectoration, and shortness of breath. He had no history of cardiopulmonary or renal disease, was receiving no long-term medications, and did not smoke. The physical examination revealed a body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 35.1, a blood pressure of 140/80 mm Hg, a pulse of 117 beats per minute, a temperature of 38.3°C, and a respiratory rate of 20 breaths per minute. The patient's findings on chest radiography together with the clinical symptoms indicated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS), similar to what has been described in severe cases of influenza and SARS.19-21 These pneumonic changes did not respond to antibacterial treatment.22 The patient was treated with oseltamivir for the possibility of infection with the H1N1 swine flu virus. Hematologic changes were evident in this patient in the form of lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and late thrombocytopenia. Abnormal hematologic variables were also quite common among patients with SARS. Lymphopenia was the most common finding in a cohort of 157 patients with SARS. In those patients, postmortem findings showed lymphopenia in various lymphoid organs with no features of bone marrow failure or reactive hemophagocytic syndrome.23 The patient also had progressive impairment of renal function, similar to what had been described in some patients with SARS and possibly attributed to direct infection of renal tissue by the virus. The renal impairment in this case started on the 9th day of symptoms and progressed over the course of the patient's illness No symptoms were observed in the hospital among doctors and nurses caring for the patient, which suggests that the disease did not spread readily. However, staff members were not tested for antibodies against the virus for confirmation. Now that the genome sequence of HCoV-EMC has become available and rapid diagnostic tests specific for HCoV-EMC have been developed,24 thorough epidemiologic investigations are warranted. Such studies should initially focus on identifying the original source of the virus (including bats and other animal species) and potential transmission events between the infected patient and direct contacts. The development of serologic assays for surveillance studies is important. Three months after the hospitalization of the patient in Jeddah, it was reported that a second patient with a history of travel to Saudi Arabia who had been transferred from a hospital in Qatar to a hospital in London was infected with the same virus.25 At present, links between the two infected patients or a potential common source of infection have not been identified. No additional cases have been identified, although several are still under investigation. Epidemiologic investigations, active case findings with the use of updated case definitions,25 and syndrome surveillance in combination with sensitive diagnostic tests will be key to monitoring the present situation and — if necessary — to intervene in a potential outbreak. It will be equally important to test whether HCoV-EMC fulfills Koch's postulates as the causative agent of severe respiratory disease. This case is a reminder that although most infections with human coronaviruses are mild and associated with common colds, certain animal and human coronaviruses may cause severe and sometimes fatal infections in humans. Although HCoV-EMC does not have many of the worrisome characteristics of SARS-CoV, we should take notice of the valuable lessons learned during the 2003 SARS outbreak with respect to outbreak investigations and management. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1211721#t=article May Allah keep all our Hijjaj healthy and safe
  12. Saudi Arabia Wahabbi Terror Factory MORE PICTURES: http://sauditerror.wordpress.com/2012/08/17/saudi-arabia-terror-factory/
  13. What is the difference between the Saudi Government & Zionists? What is the difference between the Qatari Government & Zionists? What is the difference between the Bahrain Government & Zionists? What is the difference between Turkey's Government & Zionists? ABSOLUTELY NOTHING
  14. Suicide Bomber Auction in Saudi Arabia to be used against Syrian People http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ha94Xz59dg Saudi Government uses oil money to buy people to blow themselves up for Israel and the U.S. It is the Shia nations that stand up to this perversion of Islam. Video of an auction for a suicide bomber against Syria! This takes place in a hotel conference room in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The atmosphere is festive, and the audience has children in it. But the merchandise auctioned is human flesh and blood! The video shows the father, Abu-Salah, attending the auction and offering his son Khaled as a sacrifice This is his SECOND son to be sold as a suicide bomber.The father receives 1.5 million Riyals ($400,000) as future compensation for his son's demise in Syria. At one point in the video, the father is elated at the high bids. What kind of father sells his son? What kind of person pays to have a stranger blow himself up? These are questions that Saudi Arabia, Gulf Arab states, Obama, Hillary Clinton and Europeans must answer because of their support of these terrorists in Syria. NOTE- Not all Saudi people are killers - but the government is evil and they have lost their way with real Islam. Many innocents are living un-happy in Saudi Arabia. The main problem is Wahhabis = 100% Zionists.
  15. The Rise of New Bloody War in the Middle East The advent of democracy and equality of citizens in the Middle East is not only a bad news for the current dictators of the Arab world, Al Qaeda and its Wahhabi affiliates are equally worried. Also in Pakistan and Afghanistan, Wahhabi share one common characteristic with the current Wahhabi rulers of Saudi Arabia, i.e., acute hatred for Shia who they consider infidels. The events of the Arab Spring have heightened long-standing tensions in Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province. Just three days after large-scale protests started in Bahrain on 2011, protests began in the Eastern Province, which is a 30-minute drive across the causeway from Bahrain. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Saudi interior ministry vowed to crush the protests with an "Iron Fist" and has unleashed a media-smear campaign against protests and the Shiites in general. While protests subsided over the summer, they started again in October and have become larger ever since, leading to an ever more heavy-handed response from the security forces. The Eastern Province is home to virtually all of Saudi Arabia's oil and to a sizeable Shiite majority, or around 30 percent of Saudi Arabia's citizen population. The Wahhabi creed of Salafi Islam that the state sponsors in Saudi Arabia has developed a special hostility toward the Shiites. Saudi Shiite citizens in turn have long complained of discrimination in religious practice, government employment, and business, and overall marginalization. For decades, opposition groups formed by Saudi Shiites, both leftist and Islamists, as well as hundreds of petitions by Shiite notables, have had the same demands: an end to sectarian discrimination in government employment and representation in main state sectors including at the ministerial level; more development in Shiite areas; the strengthening of the Shiite judiciary; and an end to arbitrary arrests of Shiite for religious or political reasons. None of these demands would significantly undermine the position of the royal family, or otherwise threaten the integrity of Saudi Arabia. They would rather cement the current political system and buy the allegiance of two million people living on top of the kingdom's oil. The perception of systematic discrimination has led some Saudi Shiites to embrace revolutionary ideologies over the decades. While pro-Iranian groups still exist amongst Gulf Shiites, they are not the most powerful amongst Saudi Shiites and had largely renounced violence as a political tool since at least the mid-1990s. But Saudi Arabia's repressive response to the protests and the zero-concessions policy are providing fertile breeding ground for future opposition groups. A repetition of post-1979 Shiite politics, when hundreds of young Shiites left Bahrain and Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province to become active in regional revolutionary movements, seems possible. As the protests in Bahrain and particularly in Qatif receive only limited attention on Gulf-owned channels like Al Jazeera and Al Arabiya, local Shiites are forced to watch the Iranian-sponsored Arabic-language Al Alam channel, Lebanese Hezbollah's Al Manar, Iraq's Ahlul Bait TV, or increasingly other pro-Assad channels to receive updates on the situation in their areas. The new cold war in the Middle East has turned into a fully-fledged media war, in which media outlets are either with the protests in Bahrain and Qatif and for Assad's regime, or with the protests in Syria and against the allegedly sectarian protests in Bahrain and Qatif. The situation for Saudi Shiites in the Eastern Province is no secret. The U.S. State Department's Annual Report to Congress on International Religious Freedom for the second half of 2010, the period immediately predating the Arab Spring, records arbitrary detentions, mosque closures, and the arrest of Shiite worshippers. U.S. diplomatic cables released by Wikileaks revealed that U.S. diplomats, and particularly the staff at its consulate in Dhahran, have an incredible amount of information on the local Shiite communities and seem almost obsessed with grievances they deem legitimate. But the specific problems of the Saudi Shiites almost never come up at high-level meetings with Saudi officials. This is not only due to the close Saudi and U.S. alliance. Americans sometimes share the suspicion of the Gulf Shiites, which permeates some of its allied regimes. This suspicion is partly to do with Iran, but also has its roots in the 1996 bombing of the Khobar Towers, which killed 19 U.S. servicemen. Nine Shiite prisoners have been incarcerated since 1996 for their alleged membership in Hezbollah al-Hijaz and their involvement in the bombings. They were indicted in the United States in 2001, but as U.S. foreign policy priorities changed after September 11 they became "forgotten," the name they are known by amongst Saudi Shiites. The indictment hints at the involvement of Lebanese Hezbollah and Iran but no evidence has ever been made public. At the time some Americans called for retaliation against Iran as a response to this bombing. But after September 11, fingers began to point toward al Qaeda as involved in the attack, raising questions about the guilt of these prisoners. The Shiite prisoners cannot hope ever to be "rehabilitated" in one of the government's much advertised de-radicalization programs. It seems to be justified to at least ask for a public trial, a move repeatedly endorsed by Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International. But such a trial does not appear to be on the foreign-policy agenda of the United States. The behavior of the Saudi leadership only allows the conclusion that repression of the Shiites is a fundamental part of Saudi political legitimacy. The state does not want to change the position of the Shiites and Shiite protests are used by the state to frighten the Sunni population of an Iranian takeover of the oilfields with the help of local Shiites. Similar narratives have been propagated in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) media for months, at the cost of further deepening the sectarian divide in the Gulf States. The GCC intervention in Bahrain has severely worsened sectarian relations in the Gulf and beyond to levels not seen since the Iranian Revolution. But this open Saudi sectarianism has already had negative repercussions in Iraq, as well as in Syria, Lebanon, and Kuwait. Bahrain looks set for years of sectarian conflict, community relations have broken down completely, and the state is conducting a campaign of what Shiite activists call "ethnic cleansing." Rather than completely alienating the Shiites, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain should negotiate a social contract with them. Failing to do so will lead to years of instability with uncertain outcomes. And it is far from certain that other Saudis will not be encouraged by the Shiite protests, as a recent statement by liberal Saudis from all over the kingdom denouncing the crackdown in Qatif has shown. The West should press its allies, above all Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, to stop simply shooting and arresting their Shiite citizens and brandishing them as Iranian agents and traitors. The alienation of Shiite youth foments a perfect breeding ground for a new Gulf Shiite opposition movement. Even without external help for the local Shiite protesters, the area looks ripe for a return to the tense sectarian politics of the 1980s. The United States should in its own, and in the Gulf States', interest push for a real reconciliation between the Shiites of Bahrain and Saudi Arabia and their governments. Otherwise, sectarianism will come to dominate the Gulf, to the detriment of all.
  16. Saudi Arabia discriminate against Sunnis Islam Times - The Saudi Arabian government likes to present itself as a protector and benefactor of Sunnism. Nothing could be further from the truth. Saudi Arabia is not a Sunni, but a Wahhabi state. This must be made perfectly clear... Since the foundation of the Wahhabi sect in the 18th C it has shown extreme hostility towards Sunnis. In fact Saudi Arabia emerged through a series brutal wars with non-Wahhabi Sunnis. The plight of Shiites in Saudi Arabia is well known, but few know about the rampant discrimination against Sunnis. When the Wahhabi army of Abdelaziz ibn Saud invaded Mecca in 1924 scores of Sunni scholars were killed and Sunnis books burned. Through violence and intimidation the Wahhabis managed to destroy all other Islamic schools of thought in the occupied city. Until today non-Wahhabi Sunnis are prohibited from giving sermons or lectures in any mosque in Saudi Arabia. Wahhabi preachers routinely insult and condemn Sunnis and their beliefs, but Sunnis are not allowed to even gently criticize Wahhabism. Anybody who dares to do so is fined, thrown in jail or tortured. Non-Wahhabi Sunni books, like classic collections of poetry praising the Prophet (pbuh), are banned and if found, confiscated. There is a huge difference between mainstream or traditional Sunnism and Wahhabism. For example Sunnis believe in the intercession of Prophet’s and Saints and they love and revere the Household of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh). Sunnis also encourage visiting the graves of righteous Muslims, seeking their blessings and praying for their intercession. Wahhabis on the other hand abhor these practices. Sunnis acknowledge four schools of Islamic law, while Wahhabis insists only Wahhabism is valid. The King of Saudi Arabia calls himself “Custodian of the Two Holy Shrines”. A more adequate title would be “Destroyer of the Two Holy Shrines”. When the Wahhabi army had captured Mecca and Medina in the 1920s they immediately started to ferociously destroy tombs, mosques and other sites which Sunnis hold dear and sacred. The Wahhabi government of Saudi Arabia spends enormous sums of money to convert Sunnis into Wahhabism. This is done through the media, mosques and schools and the distribution of free literature. In order to divert attention from this missionary campaign and to hide the differences and the animosity between Sunnis and Wahhabis, they constantly talk about the invented conflict between Sunnis and Shiites. Shiaphobia, demonizing Shiites, is the Wahhabi way of conjuring up a false threat to lure Sunnis into their trap. Unfortunately many uneducated Sunnis are deceived by this Shiaphobic propaganda and end up looking upon Saudi Arabia as an ally in the imagined “battle against the evil Shiites”. The irrational hatred against Shiites thus reaches a point where Sunnis are willing to belittle or forget the many differences between Sunnism and Wahhabism. Meanwhile the Wahhabis hijack mosque after mosque in Sunni countries and in poor Somalia the bloody Wahhabi war against Sunnis rages on unabated. That is why we who oppose this Wahhabi agenda should never stop pointing out that there is not a single Sunni mosque or Sunni institution of learning in Saudi Arabia. All traditional Sunnis practices, such as celebrating the birthdays of Prophet’s and Saint’s, are forbidden. It is quite ironic that the Sunni population of Shia dominated Iran are more free to express their faith than their brethren in the state of the self-proclaimed “Custodian of the Two Holy Shrines” and “defender of Sunnis”. There is not a country in the world were Sunnis are persecuted as severely as they are in Saudi Arabia. The government treats Sunnis as second-class citizens and in the eyes of many Wahhabi clerics Sunnis are not even Muslims but rather “innovators” and “grave worshippers” who deserve nothing besides contempt and punishment till they convert to Wahhabism. In short: Saudi Arabia is not the friend, but the enemy of Sunnis. source - islam times
  17. The decades-old winter of frozen and fossilised structures and systems in the Arab world are thawing. The term exceptionalism in the Arab context harks back to Samuel Huntington's thesis that envisages the progression of democracy in waves. The third wave was frozen after its initial advances in the 1970s. It never washed the shores of the Arab/Muslim world, according to this thesis. Hence the Arab exceptionalism. Today, the term has been reinvented in the context of the Arab Spring. The Spring is a year old, and not a single crowned head has rolled so far. Hence, the monarchical exceptionalism. The institution of monarchy does provide a buffer between the monarch and his subjects in the form of a government structure. The king has the privilege of sacking a besieged government and still remaining in power. In the case of Saudi Arabia, the oil-wealth, a small population, huge government patronage, welfare economy, etc., provide additional immunity. On the other hand, an ageing leadership, internet-savvy and educated youth, assertive women, sectarian divisions, and a contagious “Arab Spring” all around in the neighbourhood indicate a partial and potential vulnerability of the Saudi King. Youth, women & minorities The condition of the youth, women and the minorities is the barometer of a country's socio-political health. A closer scrutiny of these three segments of Saudi society is necessary to understand the general ethos in the country. There is no uniform mobilisation and there have been no widespread protests in the country so far. The Saudi youth, women and the Shias in the east of the country have voiced their grievances separately, nonetheless. In view of the tightly secured Saudi streets, cyberspace has provided an alternative platform to mark the popular protests. Internet activists have resorted to it in a big way. Blogs have appeared to express the anger; documentaries have been made to expose poverty that has never been acknowledged. Petitions have been signed to call for a constitutional monarchy. There was an attempt at forming a political party. The founders were arrested almost immediately. Saudi women live under the guardianship of their male relatives. Their decisions to get education, to work, to travel or to receive health care must be endorsed by their guardians. They are not permitted to drive or ride in a vehicle driven by someone who is not a close male relative or an employee. King Abdullah evoked a flurry of expectant speculation, when he stated that the Saudi women would “one day be able to drive.” That was soon after he inherited the Saudi monarchy. After waiting several years for that “one day,” the women have become restive. Late last year, some drove and posted the videos of themselves behind the wheels on YouTube and other social networks. Their cases are pending before the courts and they will not go unpunished. Late last year, King Abdullah announced in a five-minute speech televised live that he was granting women the right to vote in future municipal elections, the right to run as candidates, and that they would be appointed to the Shura Council, the 150-member body that advises the King on legislation and policy. This time around, fewer Saudi women are reported to be excited about it. Some are sceptical, and many more cynical. All Saudis follow Islam. There is a major sectarian cleavage between the Sunni and the Shia interpretations of Islam. The Shias are the largest minority in the country, constituting anywhere between four and 15 per cent of the population and numbering anywhere between one and four million. What makes the Shia situation crucial is the fact that the oil wealth is located under their soil and in the water around their land. Left to themselves, theirs could be the richest state in the entire region. Protests erupted in the Eastern Province on the “Day of Rage” in mid-March last year, and have continued since then. A hundred people have been arrested, scores have been shot dead. Survival, sectarianism & Iran The Saudi responses to the Arab Spring in its neighbourhood can neatly be summarised in three words: survival, sectarianism and Iran. Zainul Abedin ben Ali, Hosni Mubarak and Muammar Qaddafi did not survive the onslaught of the Arab Spring. The signs of its nascent arrival in the Kingdom are already evident. An active foreign policy to claim leadership of the Sunni Arabs, therefore, is an imperative for the royal survival. Iran, a Shia non-Arab power across the Gulf waters, to that extent, is the prime target of Saudi activism. The Saudi involvement with the Arab Spring has seen a progression with each case. The Saudis were reportedly disappointed by the U.S. abandoning the besieged Hosni Mubarak and offered to restore the monetary assistance that the U.S. withdrew from him. King Abdullah came out in support of Mr. Mubarak from his sickbed in Morocco. The Saudis' response to the Libyan developments was one of reticence, even as they went along with the Qatari lead in inviting foreign intervention. Yemen is a complicated and multi-layered conflict situation. The Saudis have three major concerns. One, the Saudi-born-and-bred al-Qaeda has found a safe haven in Yemen. Two, the long and uncontrolled border has been a regular route for illegal immigration, arms smuggling and narcotics trade. Three, the Saudis fear waves of Yemeni refugees, if the situation deteriorates. The Saudis have sought to manage the Yemeni situation, first by granting the former President, Ali Abdullah Saleh, political asylum, and then facilitating his exit. It was the Spring in Bahrain that jolted the Saudis into action. A small island Kingdom with a Sunni ruler and roughly 70 per cent Shia population, Bahrain has always been divided along the sectarian cleavage. The Spring, predictably, turned into the Shia struggle for equality. Political stability and a compliant regime in Bahrain are of utmost importance to the U.S., as the American base on the island is considered the most important strategic territory outside the U.S. proper. Any disturbance in the country would be unacceptable to the U.S. and its Saudi ally. As the violence erupted beyond the Bahraini authority's capability to tackle it, the Saudis stepped in. A convoy of 150 armoured troop carriers and about 50 lightly armed vehicles carried about 1,000 Saudi soldiers across the King Fahd Causeway into Bahrain in mid-March. The Saudi stand on Syria, unlike on Egypt, Yemen and Bahrain, is to support the uprising. Lest there be a doubt about its motive in castigating President Bashar al-Assad's repressive policy, the Saudi Prince, Turki al-Faisal, explained it thus: “The impending fall of Mr. Assad's barbarous regime provides a rare strategic opportunity to weaken Iran. Without this vital ally, Tehran will find it more difficult to foment discord in the Arab world. Today, there is a chance for the United States and Saudi Arabia to contain Iran and prevent it from destabilising the region.” The quote is an open admission; even an assertion. The Saudi path to Iran runs through Syria. What next? Tunisia, Libya and Egypt in North Africa have been the harbingers of the Arab Spring. All three of them have witnessed regime changes and are in the process of taking stock and moving forward at their own individual pace. Whether the Spring will spread eastward in a typical domino fashion to the rest of the Arab world remains to be seen. Whether it eventually brings about a comprehensive reshaping of the region is uncertain at best. What is certain is that the decades-old winter of frozen and fossilised structures and systems in the Arab world are thawing. And Saudi Arabia is no exception. The decades-old winter of frozen and fossilised structures and systems in the Arab world are thawing. The term exceptionalism in the Arab context harks back to Samuel Huntington's thesis that envisages the progression of democracy in waves. The third wave was frozen after its initial advances in the 1970s. It never washed the shores of the Arab/Muslim world, according to this thesis. Hence the Arab exceptionalism. Today, the term has been reinvented in the context of the Arab Spring. The Spring is a year old, and not a single crowned head has rolled so far. Hence, the monarchical exceptionalism. The institution of monarchy does provide a buffer between the monarch and his subjects in the form of a government structure. The king has the privilege of sacking a besieged government and still remaining in power. In the case of Saudi Arabia, the oil-wealth, a small population, huge government patronage, welfare economy, etc., provide additional immunity. On the other hand, an ageing leadership, internet-savvy and educated youth, assertive women, sectarian divisions, and a contagious “Arab Spring” all around in the neighbourhood indicate a partial and potential vulnerability of the Saudi King. Youth, women & minorities The condition of the youth, women and the minorities is the barometer of a country's socio-political health. A closer scrutiny of these three segments of Saudi society is necessary to understand the general ethos in the country. There is no uniform mobilisation and there have been no widespread protests in the country so far. The Saudi youth, women and the Shias in the east of the country have voiced their grievances separately, nonetheless. In view of the tightly secured Saudi streets, cyberspace has provided an alternative platform to mark the popular protests. Internet activists have resorted to it in a big way. Blogs have appeared to express the anger; documentaries have been made to expose poverty that has never been acknowledged. Petitions have been signed to call for a constitutional monarchy. There was an attempt at forming a political party. The founders were arrested almost immediately. Saudi women live under the guardianship of their male relatives. Their decisions to get education, to work, to travel or to receive health care must be endorsed by their guardians. They are not permitted to drive or ride in a vehicle driven by someone who is not a close male relative or an employee. King Abdullah evoked a flurry of expectant speculation, when he stated that the Saudi women would “one day be able to drive.” That was soon after he inherited the Saudi monarchy. After waiting several years for that “one day,” the women have become restive. Late last year, some drove and posted the videos of themselves behind the wheels on YouTube and other social networks. Their cases are pending before the courts and they will not go unpunished. Late last year, King Abdullah announced in a five-minute speech televised live that he was granting women the right to vote in future municipal elections, the right to run as candidates, and that they would be appointed to the Shura Council, the 150-member body that advises the King on legislation and policy. This time around, fewer Saudi women are reported to be excited about it. Some are sceptical, and many more cynical. All Saudis follow Islam. There is a major sectarian cleavage between the Sunni and the Shia interpretations of Islam. The Shias are the largest minority in the country, constituting anywhere between four and 15 per cent of the population and numbering anywhere between one and four million. What makes the Shia situation crucial is the fact that the oil wealth is located under their soil and in the water around their land. Left to themselves, theirs could be the richest state in the entire region. Protests erupted in the Eastern Province on the “Day of Rage” in mid-March last year, and have continued since then. A hundred people have been arrested, scores have been shot dead. Survival, sectarianism & Iran The Saudi responses to the Arab Spring in its neighbourhood can neatly be summarised in three words: survival, sectarianism and Iran. Zainul Abedin ben Ali, Hosni Mubarak and Muammar Qaddafi did not survive the onslaught of the Arab Spring. The signs of its nascent arrival in the Kingdom are already evident. An active foreign policy to claim leadership of the Sunni Arabs, therefore, is an imperative for the royal survival. Iran, a Shia non-Arab power across the Gulf waters, to that extent, is the prime target of Saudi activism. The Saudi involvement with the Arab Spring has seen a progression with each case. The Saudis were reportedly disappointed by the U.S. abandoning the besieged Hosni Mubarak and offered to restore the monetary assistance that the U.S. withdrew from him. King Abdullah came out in support of Mr. Mubarak from his sickbed in Morocco. The Saudis' response to the Libyan developments was one of reticence, even as they went along with the Qatari lead in inviting foreign intervention. Yemen is a complicated and multi-layered conflict situation. The Saudis have three major concerns. One, the Saudi-born-and-bred al-Qaeda has found a safe haven in Yemen. Two, the long and uncontrolled border has been a regular route for illegal immigration, arms smuggling and narcotics trade. Three, the Saudis fear waves of Yemeni refugees, if the situation deteriorates. The Saudis have sought to manage the Yemeni situation, first by granting the former President, Ali Abdullah Saleh, political asylum, and then facilitating his exit. It was the Spring in Bahrain that jolted the Saudis into action. A small island Kingdom with a Sunni ruler and roughly 70 per cent Shia population, Bahrain has always been divided along the sectarian cleavage. The Spring, predictably, turned into the Shia struggle for equality. Political stability and a compliant regime in Bahrain are of utmost importance to the U.S., as the American base on the island is considered the most important strategic territory outside the U.S. proper. Any disturbance in the country would be unacceptable to the U.S. and its Saudi ally. As the violence erupted beyond the Bahraini authority's capability to tackle it, the Saudis stepped in. A convoy of 150 armoured troop carriers and about 50 lightly armed vehicles carried about 1,000 Saudi soldiers across the King Fahd Causeway into Bahrain in mid-March. The Saudi stand on Syria, unlike on Egypt, Yemen and Bahrain, is to support the uprising. Lest there be a doubt about its motive in castigating President Bashar al-Assad's repressive policy, the Saudi Prince, Turki al-Faisal, explained it thus: “The impending fall of Mr. Assad's barbarous regime provides a rare strategic opportunity to weaken Iran. Without this vital ally, Tehran will find it more difficult to foment discord in the Arab world. Today, there is a chance for the United States and Saudi Arabia to contain Iran and prevent it from destabilising the region.” The quote is an open admission; even an assertion. The Saudi path to Iran runs through Syria. What next? Tunisia, Libya and Egypt in North Africa have been the harbingers of the Arab Spring. All three of them have witnessed regime changes and are in the process of taking stock and moving forward at their own individual pace. Whether the Spring will spread eastward in a typical domino fashion to the rest of the Arab world remains to be seen. Whether it eventually brings about a comprehensive reshaping of the region is uncertain at best. What is certain is that the decades-old winter of frozen and fossilised structures and systems in the Arab world are thawing. And Saudi Arabia is no exception. courtesy - the hindu
  18. From time to time, I read about condemnations of Islam coming from non-Islamic groups, especially concerning the all-too-common violence perpetrated in the name of religion. Indeed there is plenty to condemn. Salafi fundamentalist despite verbally professing a desire for peace and justice in the world, are actually pro-war, pro-homicide and pro-violence in practice (or they may be silent on the subject, which is, according to moral theology, the same as being pro-violence). I use the term fundamentalist in the sense that the religious person, who ascribes to a fundamentalist point of view, believes, among other dogmatic belief, that their scriptures are inerrant and thus they can find passages in their holy books that justify homicidal violence against their perceived or fingered enemies, while simultaneously ignoring the numerous contradictory passages that forbid violence and homicide and instead prescribe love, hospitality, mercy, forgiveness and reconciliation. Behind the scenes, of course, there are hidden elites — amoral, politically and financially motivated operatives who are embedded in their religious organizations — who, through the strength of their political power, can easily manipulate the followers into clamoring for sectarian war. Though history has long since been forgotten or ignored, the true followers of the Prophet Mohammad (pbuh), rejected violence, tried to return good for evil, fed the hungry, did acts of mercy and unconditional love and tried to make friends out of their enemies (by caring for them, feeding them, praying for them and certainly refusing to kill them or pay for somebody else to kill them). Soon after the death of Prophet, Islam became a religion of justified violence, contrary to the teachings and modeling of Prophet, and it remains that way until this very hour. The followers of that very Salafi Muslims should be courageously “going to the streets” and saying “NO” wherever and whenever fear and hatred raise their ugly heads and try to provoke violence — no matter if it is coming from anywhere – or from within the local Sheikh. Thank You, Raza Mehkeri Houston, Texas
  19. Shia Killing And Salafi Fundamentalist From time to time, I read about condemnations of Islam coming from non-Islamic groups, especially concerning the all-too-common violence perpetrated in the name of religion. Indeed there is plenty to condemn. Salafi fundamentalist despite verbally professing a desire for peace and justice in the world, are actually pro-war, pro-homicide and pro-violence in practice (or they may be silent on the subject, which is, according to moral theology, the same as being pro-violence). I use the term fundamentalist in the sense that the religious person, who ascribes to a fundamentalist point of view, believes, among other dogmatic belief, that their scriptures are inerrant and thus they can find passages in their holy books that justify homicidal violence against their perceived or fingered enemies, while simultaneously ignoring the numerous contradictory passages that forbid violence and homicide and instead prescribe love, hospitality, mercy, forgiveness and reconciliation. Behind the scenes, of course, there are hidden elites — amoral, politically and financially motivated operatives who are embedded in their religious organizations — who, through the strength of their political power, can easily manipulate the followers into clamoring for sectarian war. Though history has long since been forgotten or ignored, the true followers of the Prophet Mohammad (pbuh), rejected violence, tried to return good for evil, fed the hungry, did acts of mercy and unconditional love and tried to make friends out of their enemies (by caring for them, feeding them, praying for them and certainly refusing to kill them or pay for somebody else to kill them). Soon after the death of Prophet, Islam became a religion of justified violence, contrary to the teachings and modeling of Prophet, and it remains that way until this very hour. The followers of that very Salafi Muslims should be courageously “going to the streets” and saying “NO” wherever and whenever fear and hatred raise their ugly heads and try to provoke violence — no matter if it is coming from anywhere – or from within the local Sheikh. Thank You, Raza Mehkeri Houston, Texas
  20. (salam) http://www.presstv.ir/detail/206513.html Have my eyes deceived me? Hypocrisy much?
  21. (salam) Time: 22 October · 13:30 - 16:00 Location: Royal Embassy Of Saudi Arabia 30 Charles Street London, United Kingdom Saturday 22 of October there would be a protest held opposite the Saudi Arabia Embassy. We are trying to gather as many people as we can to protest against the Wahhabism . Invite and encourage as much people as you can to get together and stop this Satanic Group. wahabi crimes : * Terrorist attack on Imam Al-Askari (as) Shrine * Suicide Bombing On The Azadars of Imam Hussain (as) * Supporting The Ale Khalifa & Attacking The Shias Of Bahrain * Slaughtering The Shia's in Afgahnistan Pakistan ,Saudi arabia....... * Destruction of Janat Al-Baqi * Attacking The Shia Hajaj in Mekka and medina You're welcome to bring Poster's , and the Bahraini or your national flag to the event. But please refrain from bringing political Flag or Posters. Please Invite Your Friends And Share This Event . https://www.facebook...123383621100175
  22. Truth unveiled! Axis of evil Saudis, Americans and Israelis thought they wanted to hijack Syria in the middle of Arab spring, but that’s not they want, they want a slap with the back of the right hand! Arab spring is naturally an anti Israel movement against puppet regimes or friends of Israel such as Mubarak, as the chief of Israel described him as Israel’s best friend. They go down, and Israel is left without friends. Is Assad anything like Mubarak? no, was he also Israel’s best friend? no, did he promise his people to free occupied Syrian lands from Israel? YES. True Syrians’ demand for reforms in Syria is completely acceptable and legal just like Asad said, which is why he’s bringing reforms to Syria. But don’t get me wrong, do not mistake terrorists for protesters, this is what I’m going to explain for you. Just yesterday, Lebanese army intelligence has intercepted a covert shipment of 1,000 assault rifles, reportedly destined for the city of Baniyas in Syria. Army investigators say they have uncovered ties between the smugglers and the political entourage of former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, who is backed by the United States and Saudi Arabia. The hardcore Sunni Wahhabi House of Saud – in yet another towering show of hypocrisy, and faithful to its hatred of secular Arab republics – has branded the Bashar al-Assad-controlled Ba’ath regime in Syria “a killing machine”. But who would of thought? Saudi Arabia is busy killing people in another country named Bahrain, which most of the news media don’t cover since the US media have been ordered not to cover news on the Saudi allies’ brutal crackdown on Bahraini people. Reports from the Center’s colleagues in the United States say “In the US some news agencies and TV stations were asked not to report on Bahrain and not to embarrass [President Barack Obama’s administration." Kingdom Saudi Arabia the most brutal dictatorship of all time pretends to be worried about on-going unrest in a secular Arab state? why? because Assad's regime is anti Israel and not a puppet, which goes against Saudi influence in Middle east. March 14 seems to be nearly exposed. Hariri the son betrayed Hariri the father, even tho Hezbollah revealed Israel's possible involvement in his father's assassination, he insists on selling Lebanon to Israel and Saudi Arabia. March 14 people are bunch of soulless traitors who only care about their own wealth and money in their bank accounts all over the world, they do not care about Lebanon's freedom being threatened by Israel, in fact, their hatred toward Hezbollah makes them rather Israeli occupation, where were they when Israel had southern Lebanon occupied for decades? wasn't it Hezbollah attacks which forced IDF to pull out? 14 March sickos' connection with arm smuggling to Syria must be investigated, and if proven, their party's activities must be banned and their members must be arrested. Lebanese intelligence also eavesdropped on discussions between the suspects and an arms dealer, in which the two sides agreed on a down payment of US$100,000 once buyers were shown high-quality Kalashnikov and M-16 rifle samples. The plan was to either ship the rifles in one batch by sea to Baniyas in Syria, or to divide it into smaller batches and smuggle it through Lebanon’s northern border. The suspects and the dealer were followed and arrested by army intelligence forces on July 30, after delivery of the arms in Ras Beirut. Hezbollah’s Al-Manar television identified the smugglers as Wassam and Samir Tamim. They have reportedly confessed to running over 30 arms-smuggling operations from Marina to Baniyas with the assistance of Mohammad Kabbara, a member of the Al-Mustaqbal parliamentary bloc tied to Saudi intelligence. Al-Manar stated that the center of operations was Kabbara’s farm in northern Lebanon, adding that this was also a transit point for Islamist (Salafi) fighters traveling to the Syrian city of Homs. The Syrian army claimed last week that in recent fighting near Homs it has detained hundreds of Salafi fighters (reportedly including Afghans) with Lebanese documents, whose transfer to Syria was facilitated by Kabbara. The majority of Syrians have been always behind their government, it is not hidden to anybody that Assad's weak intelligence forces failed to protect his country from terrorists. One of the terrorists captured by Syrian intelligence forces confessed and said several terrorist groups were operating in Hama where their members are instructed to attack police, security personnel and law-enforcement officials in order to cause mayhem in the city. He also said the footage broadcast by Syrian television showing people throwing mutilated bodies into a river some ten days ago was very much true, confessing, "I was among the terrorists who threw one of the dead….” He said they mutilated the bodies of the victims with knives and swords in order to scare away security personnel and prevent them from entering Hama. Al-Kattan said terrorist leaders pay each member SYP 5000 (almost USD106) per day. By all means, the unrest in Syria differs from the Arab uprisings since it is a 'conspiracy' from foreign intervention attempting to 'reshape' the country's political structure. In the latest attempts, Washington and Tel Aviv hatched plots to reignite the flames of unrest in Syria through smuggling weapons into the Arab country. Informed sources in Lebanon blame Salafi extremists and elements associated with the country's al-Mustaqbal party for direct involvement in the recent unrest in Syria. The Lebanese sources say former Mustaqbal MP Mustafa Hashem has rented a large number of gas stations in the northern border region of Wadi Khaled, where the nomad residents on both the Lebanese and Syrian sides of the frontier are engaged in widespread smuggling. http://www.informati...rticle28832.htm http://www.atimes.co...t/MH13Ak01.html http://www.dailykos....ence-in-Bahrain http://www.presstv.i...ail/193510.html http://www.presstv.i...ail/178965.html http://www.presstv.i...ail/182208.html www.presstv.ir/detail/172567.html http://shervinandpol...t-syria-unrest/
  23. Saudi Arabia Under West’s Microscope - Part I Nedal Hamadeh The French Foreign Ministry has requested researchers for five studies on one question: Why has not the Saudi street moved yet? Nowadays, busy circles in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in France are unprecedentedly and actively pursuing the fast moving events in the Arab world, especially in the Middle East. Paris, stumbling since the beginning of the events and the Arab revolutions, is trying to gingerly work over these days. This is what is shown in dealing with the Syrian affair despite some statements here and there most of which are connected with internal squabbles in the house of the French decision making over what is going on in the Arab world. It seems that the French have decided to adopt a new policy namely the principle of reading what may happen or to prognosticate events that might be useful and beneficial for the role that France is considering to play in the " the evolving new Arab world, " as it was called by one of the diplomats working in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France. This French stand has induced the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France to request researchers at five different research centers and French universities to put forward five studies about the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia examining one question:" Why have not the Saudi masses moved out till today?" This question was reported by a researcher in the Middle East affairs at one of the French universities, who will participate in finalizing one of those studies which are urgently requested to be ready soon. The intensified logic of the events in the Arab region has induced the French politicians to question the real reason preventing the Saudi masses from moving out in the streets till now; mainly, first, because of the economic importance of this country, as it is known for all; second, its being the only Arab ally on whom the West depends in annoying Iran, the target of the Western countries and Israel which endeavor to prevent it from completing and developing its nuclear program; third, because of Saudi Arabia's commitment not to incite against Israel and refraining from using oil as a weapon in particular. Simultaneously, in connection with the Saudi affairs, and contrary to declared statements, major concern prevails in the French political circles about Saudi military intervention in Bahrain, which the French foreign policy stakeholders consider a reckless Saudi measure which will eventually serve the interest of Iran. They also consider such a measure will make Iran conceive of the Saudi Royal family feet sinking in the quicksand of the region, and that Iran is waiting for the opportunity and appropriate time to make Saudi Arabia pay for what it has done, according to an academic French source concerned about the affairs in the region. The French evaluation for the Saudi error in Bahrain, though it is not public, is not far from that of Iran's, which once described that intervention in Bahrain as a strategic awful error committed by Saudi Arabia. In addition, the conviction of the French says that the Saudi American relations as well as those of the Saudi European ones cannot go on with changes arising in the Arab region in case the Saudi regime remained on its current structure. France has also disagreement and reproach for Saudi Arabia resulting from the American - British veto on the sale of the French weapons; this makes France "Sarkozy", which relied heavily on Saudi Arabia in the marketing of aircraft Rafale, the French fighter in the Gulf, frustrated by the unlimited dependence and pledge of Saudi officials to everything America says, especially the weapons issue. "Saudi Arabia will not remain safe from the drastic changes despite its preemptive offensive in Bahrain and its intensive attempts to maintain, Ali Abdullah Saleh in Yemen." Thus say the majority of the French who have a direct relationship with the files of the Arab region; However, the timing of the movement, how it will spread, and where it is going to start remain the subject of the question. Because all of this could determine the outcome of any change both internally and externally, noting the surge in the transfer of funds from Saudi Arabia to abroad since the crisis in Bahrain, and this surge in money transfers according to French sources, includes dozens of princes in the Saudi royal family. Saudi Arabia under the West’s Microscope - Part II Nidal Hamadeh Part Two: The Reasons Why the Western Empathy and Interest Are Wearing off No sooner do you talk of Saudi Arabia in France than will the arguer think of Qatar. The echo of the invisible war between the two regimes has gone out of the ruling palaces and has reached the parlors of the Decision makers in the West. Although Saudi Arabia's officials have always underestimated Qatar and their Qatari peers before the West, the westerners have, simultaneously, always been following with interest everything released by Al-Jazeera Channel particularly that this channel has exclusively broadcast Osama Bin Laden statements, and it has placed Iraq as a priority in its coverage of the events supported by numerous work teams and gigantic capacities. Thus, due to Al-Jazeera success, there has been an influence on the view of the West toward the Gulf Arab countries particularly toward Saudi Arabia which is not considered anymore the only weighty force in the order of the emirates and the Gulf Sheikdoms. Subsequently, the role of Qatar has started to surface because of Al-Jazeera needed by the West, particularly, the U.S.A. to dampen, on one hand, the occupation in Iraq, Afghanistan, Palestine and to gradually allow the incursions of the American political motives, on the other hand. This has been what evoked the Saudi wrath against Qatar; as a result, the Saudi officials have never attenuated instigating their peers in the West against Qatar. Such an act occurred several times in a private conversation with President Jacques Chirac of France as mentioned in the book "Dans le Secret des President" or " The Secrets of Presidents" by the French writer and journalist Mr. Vincent Nouzille; also, as Richard Lapavier the author of " The Secret Story of 1559 Resolution." In this context, the instigation triggered by the Saudis has extended to the U.S.A. and Britain. However, the western decision making circles, which have been working on making of Saudi Arabia a deterring force against Iran in the region after the Turks had refused negotiating the idea, have started to seriously consider and talk over the advantages of the Saudi model in the Arab region particularly after the Saudi military interference in Yemen which has shown the limitation of the Saudi military and political force in spite of the gigantic financial capacities. In this context, Fatiha Dazi, Senior Analyst Arabian Peninsula, Doctor in Political Science, Middle East Desk, Delegation of Strategic Affairs, Political Department, Dr. Fatiha Dazi-Heni Ministry of Defence, Paris, and author of the book " The Kingdoms of the Gulf" wrote that Saudi Arabia is a very affluent country, nevertheless, abundant affluence alone can never produce a strategic and significant role for such countries. Such fallback in the importance of the Saudi ruling regime was not limited to what was mentioned earlier, yet it reached the point of the conviction of the elite political figures in the West that the Saudi royal family has been the origin of extremism and its nurturing in the Islamic regions, in addition to its being based on a non-viable model of governance for long. This has been indicated by French Secret Service Head Alan Chouet of the (DGSE) who in turn lashed out an offense against the Saud royal family and the ruling regime in the Saudi Arab Kingdom accusing them of patronizing violence and that THEY are the country of extremism and Islamic fanaticism, not Iran or Iraq. He added at a conference held at the French Senate House and attended by several French, European, and American experts and titled "The Middle East during the Nuclear Time," one of whose lecturers was Mr. Khafier Solana, the previous General Secretary of NATO and the previous Commissioner of the European Diplomacy, along with several Arab and foreign diplomats in Paris, and in the presence of the ex-Secretary of State Mrs. Madeleine Albright: "This family has ruled since 1926 and has relied on the legitimacy of the sacred shrines and on escalating Islamic extremism and fanaticism in its governance after it had removed the Hashemites, the historically legal rulers and administrators for the sacred shrine affairs." The truth is that this Saudi family is the foundation of violence in the Islamic regions because it has relied on its continuity in ruling on the logic of extremism and auctioneering over others in every Islamic issue; all of this has been done in the hope of subduing any internal protesting movement and encountering others externally such as Iran or Iraq during Saddam Hussein's regime. In the light of lacking the human resources and because of the absence of an industrial infrastructure in Saudi Arabia, the Saudi family has relied in its political administration on paying funds, by funding societies and groups holding violent and extremist beliefs all over the world. However, the real reason for stability in Saudi Arabia and for the stable Saudi family regime originates from the agreement made in 1945 between the King( Abdel A'ziz Al Saud) and the American president (Franklin Roosevelt), which stated American protection for the Saudi regime in exchange of a guarantee by the ruling family to keep the oil flowing to America." Here Choeut words end. Now and after the Arab revolutions encompassing the Arab region, there is a geo-political redesign for the map both regionally and internationally according to the French Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr. Alain Juppé. The features of this aggressive map, as seen by the elite in the West, does not fit with the continuity of the regime in Saudi Arabia in its present form, because the Arab changes due would make the western countries' support for this regime a heavy burden on them, which subsequently would mean more hostility against the Arab nations, which in turn never fear their regimes anymore. "Undoubtedly, the changes are going to extend to Saudi Arabia," a French academic expert in the Arab affairs says adding, " The new concepts and the current variables must collide on with the Saudi hard regime and they will topple it."
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