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  1. Salam Alaykum Insha Allah I am planning to pay another visit to Iraq during Ashura or Arbaeen this year Request if any one can help in finding a caravan from India to Iraq during these periods One can mail me on my email adress: lubnana@homail.com Thanks
  2. So I had this dialogue with an Iranian in the comments section who claimed her culture and history had nothing to do with Islam and that Islam some how destroyed her country, I debunked all her fallacious arguments and exposed her use of unsound logic(I have highlighted certain points in color coding for emphasis/or to highlight the jist of the arguments). Also my name in the comments section was Sean Penn, the Iranian was Zaba Newsjunkie: JohnDuffin • 16 days ago Salmon Rushdie tells a story how he drove from the UK to India to see his family. He was able to drive through the middle east w/o All of the Islamic countries driving their citizens to the field of battle in the name of Islam back then, like they have been doing for the last couple of decades. There are many countries that are under Islamic control now that would be wonderful to visit. We will just have to wait for Islam to burn itself out before a real sustainable business of traveling can even be remotely considered. Iran has a lot to show the world, once the violent Islamic leaders are driven out, and civilization can return. 3 • Share › Reason_and_Doubt JohnDuffin • 16 days ago Iran is unique in being a Shiite-led government. Shia isn't common in the Muslim world, they're a minority of the overall Muslim population. A lot of what is great about Iran is because of Islam. The poets Rumi and Hafiz were both Muslims. Works like this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... were influenced by moderate and even liberal interpretations of Islam. Beautiful art and architecture lies hidden to the Western world because of politics now. The scary stuff you see on TV today is the result of an authoritarian government, pushing strict interpretations on a populace rocked by violence and hit hard by international sanctions. Saudi Arabia isn't much different, but they're Sunni and we call them allies. 6 • Share › Human Being Reason_and_Doubt • 16 days ago Not so. Persian poets and philosophers have been fighting against Islam for the last 1400 years. Omar Khayyam, Hafiz, Ferdowsi and others used poetry to protect the people of Iran from the toxic influence of Islam. Muslims and particularly Muslim women have been the primary victims of Islam. Islam is not compatible with a civilized way of life. Can you name one Islamic nation where people can freely criticize Islam and not lose their lives? 4 • Share › Sean Penn Human Being • 15 days ago Iranian contributions to science were immense during the Abbasid era. 3 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago Iranian contributions to science were immense MYTH • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Ah so the House of Baghdad was a MYTH Alhazen didn't exist the Moors who brought Ancient Greek and Roman culture were never came to Spain all scientists during that period were a MYTH? 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago Lies that Moslems make up. Islam invented nothing. Propaganda is not truth. Mendacity is not history. What follows is a list of items that Moslems never invented but claim as their own. In times past this was called 'lying', with mendacity a psychopathic condition usually found in mental degenerates. Today it is recognized as truth or at least as 'an interesting viewpoint, which cannot be dis-proven, since reality does not exist, and we don't know anything'. http://western-civilisation.co... • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Totally because the first person to propose separation of church and state was Averroes an Arab Muslim. 2 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago islam is a political ideology with the thinnest of thin veneers of religion. For details: politicalislam.com • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Nice no original ideas all articles! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago I'm pointing out the problem in the world is mostly islam, which foments a staggering 95% of current armed conflicts. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago About as true as Mel Gibson's claims about Jews. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Reason_and_Doubt • 14 days ago Are you protecting islam's secrets? ANYONE can pull up a list of hot spots and see who is fomenting. 95% are islamic. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 14 days ago A lot of those 'hot spots' are countries with impoverished people, authoritarian regimes, and atrocious standards of living. The problem is that you keep insisting that the egg laid the chicken. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Can you even form your own original arguments or do you keep posting links 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago The problem is islam. The rest is commentary. Go and study. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Red herring Fallacy you did not address my point! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago There is nothing good about islam. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Answer my argument instead of using smokescreen and red herring fallacies. 2 • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Red Herring again! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago too salty • Share › Mike B Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago The only one salty is you. Did a Muslim employer not give you a job; is that why you're mad? • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Mike B • 15 days ago islam is not compatible with the West. There are many reasons NOT to hire a muzlim. • Share › Mike B Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago That's pretty funny, because Muslim people tend to be wealthier and more educated than the their fellow Americans, and 100% guaranteed all of them are smarter than you. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Mike B • 14 days ago I'm just crushed.... • Share › Mike B Zaba Newsjunkie • 14 days ago From all your hatred towards Muslims, it seems like you are crushed. Maybe go ask a Muslim to give you a job. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Again Biased sites with no objectivity. 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago got facts? • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago 14 centuries of islamic history as recorded by Arab historians. Biased. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago The West can corroborate...unless you want to tell us Muslims were the only people with a written language til the 20th century • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Reason_and_Doubt • 14 days ago The West was not observing islam's 'most perfect human ever'. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 14 days ago Zayn Malik? • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Random biased article NICE! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago biased How so? Got other facts? • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago islam is a culture destroyer • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Well, now that Hasbara has weighed in... • Share › Human Being Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Not so. Check out: Razi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... Avicenna https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... Omar Khayyam https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... Iranians have contributed a lot to science. • Share › Sean Penn Human Being • 15 days ago I am an Iranian studies major, and what you have said is wrong rulers in the Muslim world patronized poets like Hafiz, Sadi, and Ferdowsi. For instance, Timur was a patron of Persian miniatures and calligraphy under the Timurid era Persian arts reached a new height during his time, he also patronized Hafez who wrote to poets during the Timurid era. Also, the historical Persian empire built on the successes of many of its satrapies or client states which would include modern day Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Azerbaijan and the Central Asian countries such as Turkmenistan. 2 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago the historical Persian empire had nothing to do with islam. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Ah so give up the Arabic script, give up the Arabic and Chinese influence in Persian miniature painting. Give up the floral and geometric designs in Persian metalwork pottery and carpet weaving which arose during that time period and see what's left of "Iranian culture." 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago Did they have a choice? NO! • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Ferdowsi had the choice to use any other script Pahlavi, Avestan etc he used the Arabic script 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 14 days ago Ferdowsi had the choice There is no choice under islam. The name is self defining. Since you are a self described Iranian studies major, you would know EXACTLY what islam means! • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago He was, apparently, a good dhimmi. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago They did 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago I stand corrected: convert or die. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Reason_and_Doubt • 16 days ago A lot of what may be great about Iran is in spite of Islam. 3 • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Well partly but philosphers and scientists like Avicenna arose during the Abbasid era and the Baghdad House of Wisdom was created during this time period with contributions from Persians, Arabs, Turks, and even North Africans. 2 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago islam means submission to Allah and sharia law. That leaves NO room for independent thought and action. islam invented nothing. • Share › Sincere Ironic Reason_and_Doubt • 16 days ago Iran used to be one of the leaders in the world for math and science until Islam took hold. 1 • Share › Sean Penn Sincere Ironic • 15 days ago Actually it was known for its accomplishments in medicine during the Abbasid era you see great philosophers and scientists like Avicenna or Averroes. Science and math only left Iran and the Muslim World after the destruction of the House of Wisdom in Baghdad by the Mongols who burned libraries and scientific works. 2 • Share › Sincere Ironic Sean Penn • 15 days ago First, Medicine is a Science. Science no longer flourishes in this region, because too much of it contradicts the teachings in Islam. 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sincere Ironic • 15 days ago not to mention the inbreeding..... • Share › Righteous Reverend Cynical Sean Penn • 15 days ago And now comes ISIS to continue the job. At least the Mongols had decent BBQ. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sincere Ironic • 15 days ago How Muslims Did Not Invent Algebra Enza Ferreri follows up on her earlier post about the inflated claims of Islamic contributions to science, this time tackling the topic of Islam and mathematics, specifically algebra. There is archaeological evidence that the roots of algebra date back to the ancient Babylonians, and were then developed in Egypt and Greece. The Chinese and especially the Indians also advanced algebra and wrote important works on the subject. http://gatesofvienna.net/2013/... • Share › Sincere Ironic Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago There is a difference between saying that they were one of the leaders in the world on math and saying they invented Algebra. Even the the word Algebra comes from Arabic. 1 • Share › − Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Greeks and Romans borrowed Algebra Math and Science from the Egyptians! • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago All those societies are ARAB now. • Share ›
  3. So I had this dialogue with an Iranian in the comments section who claimed her culture and history had nothing to do with Islam and that Islam some how destroyed her country, I debunked all her fallacious arguments and exposed her use of unsound logic(I have highlighted certain points in color coding for emphasis/or to highlight the jist of the arguments). Also my name in the comments section was Sean Penn, the Iranian was Zaba Newsjunkie: JohnDuffin • 16 days ago Salmon Rushdie tells a story how he drove from the UK to India to see his family. He was able to drive through the middle east w/o All of the Islamic countries driving their citizens to the field of battle in the name of Islam back then, like they have been doing for the last couple of decades. There are many countries that are under Islamic control now that would be wonderful to visit. We will just have to wait for Islam to burn itself out before a real sustainable business of traveling can even be remotely considered. Iran has a lot to show the world, once the violent Islamic leaders are driven out, and civilization can return. 3 • Share › Reason_and_Doubt JohnDuffin • 16 days ago Iran is unique in being a Shiite-led government. Shia isn't common in the Muslim world, they're a minority of the overall Muslim population. A lot of what is great about Iran is because of Islam. The poets Rumi and Hafiz were both Muslims. Works like this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... were influenced by moderate and even liberal interpretations of Islam. Beautiful art and architecture lies hidden to the Western world because of politics now. The scary stuff you see on TV today is the result of an authoritarian government, pushing strict interpretations on a populace rocked by violence and hit hard by international sanctions. Saudi Arabia isn't much different, but they're Sunni and we call them allies. 6 • Share › Human Being Reason_and_Doubt • 16 days ago Not so. Persian poets and philosophers have been fighting against Islam for the last 1400 years. Omar Khayyam, Hafiz, Ferdowsi and others used poetry to protect the people of Iran from the toxic influence of Islam. Muslims and particularly Muslim women have been the primary victims of Islam. Islam is not compatible with a civilized way of life. Can you name one Islamic nation where people can freely criticize Islam and not lose their lives? 4 • Share › Sean Penn Human Being • 15 days ago Iranian contributions to science were immense during the Abbasid era. 3 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago Iranian contributions to science were immense MYTH • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Ah so the House of Baghdad was a MYTH Alhazen didn't exist the Moors who brought Ancient Greek and Roman culture were never came to Spain all scientists during that period were a MYTH? 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago Lies that Moslems make up. Islam invented nothing. Propaganda is not truth. Mendacity is not history. What follows is a list of items that Moslems never invented but claim as their own. In times past this was called 'lying', with mendacity a psychopathic condition usually found in mental degenerates. Today it is recognized as truth or at least as 'an interesting viewpoint, which cannot be dis-proven, since reality does not exist, and we don't know anything'. http://western-civilisation.co... • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Totally because the first person to propose separation of church and state was Averroes an Arab Muslim. 2 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago islam is a political ideology with the thinnest of thin veneers of religion. For details: politicalislam.com • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Nice no original ideas all articles! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago I'm pointing out the problem in the world is mostly islam, which foments a staggering 95% of current armed conflicts. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago About as true as Mel Gibson's claims about Jews. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Reason_and_Doubt • 14 days ago Are you protecting islam's secrets? ANYONE can pull up a list of hot spots and see who is fomenting. 95% are islamic. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 14 days ago A lot of those 'hot spots' are countries with impoverished people, authoritarian regimes, and atrocious standards of living. The problem is that you keep insisting that the egg laid the chicken. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Can you even form your own original arguments or do you keep posting links 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago The problem is islam. The rest is commentary. Go and study. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Red herring Fallacy you did not address my point! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago There is nothing good about islam. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Answer my argument instead of using smokescreen and red herring fallacies. 2 • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Red Herring again! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago too salty • Share › Mike B Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago The only one salty is you. Did a Muslim employer not give you a job; is that why you're mad? • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Mike B • 15 days ago islam is not compatible with the West. There are many reasons NOT to hire a muzlim. • Share › Mike B Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago That's pretty funny, because Muslim people tend to be wealthier and more educated than the their fellow Americans, and 100% guaranteed all of them are smarter than you. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Mike B • 14 days ago I'm just crushed.... • Share › Mike B Zaba Newsjunkie • 14 days ago From all your hatred towards Muslims, it seems like you are crushed. Maybe go ask a Muslim to give you a job. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Again Biased sites with no objectivity. 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago got facts? • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago 14 centuries of islamic history as recorded by Arab historians. Biased. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago The West can corroborate...unless you want to tell us Muslims were the only people with a written language til the 20th century • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Reason_and_Doubt • 14 days ago The West was not observing islam's 'most perfect human ever'. • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 14 days ago Zayn Malik? • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Random biased article NICE! 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago biased How so? Got other facts? • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago islam is a culture destroyer • Share › Reason_and_Doubt Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Well, now that Hasbara has weighed in... • Share › Human Being Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Not so. Check out: Razi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... Avicenna https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... Omar Khayyam https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... Iranians have contributed a lot to science. • Share › Sean Penn Human Being • 15 days ago I am an Iranian studies major, and what you have said is wrong rulers in the Muslim world patronized poets like Hafiz, Sadi, and Ferdowsi. For instance, Timur was a patron of Persian miniatures and calligraphy under the Timurid era Persian arts reached a new height during his time, he also patronized Hafez who wrote to poets during the Timurid era. Also, the historical Persian empire built on the successes of many of its satrapies or client states which would include modern day Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Azerbaijan and the Central Asian countries such as Turkmenistan. 2 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago the historical Persian empire had nothing to do with islam. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Ah so give up the Arabic script, give up the Arabic and Chinese influence in Persian miniature painting. Give up the floral and geometric designs in Persian metalwork pottery and carpet weaving which arose during that time period and see what's left of "Iranian culture." 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago Did they have a choice? NO! • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Ferdowsi had the choice to use any other script Pahlavi, Avestan etc he used the Arabic script 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 14 days ago Ferdowsi had the choice There is no choice under islam. The name is self defining. Since you are a self described Iranian studies major, you would know EXACTLY what islam means! • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago He was, apparently, a good dhimmi. • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago They did 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago I stand corrected: convert or die. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Reason_and_Doubt • 16 days ago A lot of what may be great about Iran is in spite of Islam. 3 • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Well partly but philosphers and scientists like Avicenna arose during the Abbasid era and the Baghdad House of Wisdom was created during this time period with contributions from Persians, Arabs, Turks, and even North Africans. 2 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sean Penn • 15 days ago islam means submission to Allah and sharia law. That leaves NO room for independent thought and action. islam invented nothing. • Share › Sincere Ironic Reason_and_Doubt • 16 days ago Iran used to be one of the leaders in the world for math and science until Islam took hold. 1 • Share › Sean Penn Sincere Ironic • 15 days ago Actually it was known for its accomplishments in medicine during the Abbasid era you see great philosophers and scientists like Avicenna or Averroes. Science and math only left Iran and the Muslim World after the destruction of the House of Wisdom in Baghdad by the Mongols who burned libraries and scientific works. 2 • Share › Sincere Ironic Sean Penn • 15 days ago First, Medicine is a Science. Science no longer flourishes in this region, because too much of it contradicts the teachings in Islam. 1 • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sincere Ironic • 15 days ago not to mention the inbreeding..... • Share › Righteous Reverend Cynical Sean Penn • 15 days ago And now comes ISIS to continue the job. At least the Mongols had decent BBQ. • Share › Zaba Newsjunkie Sincere Ironic • 15 days ago How Muslims Did Not Invent Algebra Enza Ferreri follows up on her earlier post about the inflated claims of Islamic contributions to science, this time tackling the topic of Islam and mathematics, specifically algebra. There is archaeological evidence that the roots of algebra date back to the ancient Babylonians, and were then developed in Egypt and Greece. The Chinese and especially the Indians also advanced algebra and wrote important works on the subject. http://gatesofvienna.net/2013/... • Share › Sincere Ironic Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago There is a difference between saying that they were one of the leaders in the world on math and saying they invented Algebra. Even the the word Algebra comes from Arabic. 1 • Share › − Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago Greeks and Romans borrowed Algebra Math and Science from the Egyptians! • Share › Sean Penn Zaba Newsjunkie • 15 days ago All those societies are ARAB now. • Share ›
  4. Salam everyone sorry to disturb everyone again but i had to start a new thread again because i noticed after posting expenses in my other thread noone replied me because its urgent for me i had to start a new thread! So heres the estimate i made for 3 people going to iran from pakistan for a total of 8-10 days around 2 days would be used for flying from and to pakistan so total of 8 days would be left in iran, please brothers and sisters let me know if the estimate i made down is okay or no if not please tell me how much would i need to spend instead, and also that if there are some other expenses i didnt mention here olease note them out thx 1- flight tickets for 3( will take my mom and sister too) : 50000rs x 3 = 150000rs 2- after landing in tehran airport will take a cab or a bus to qom - 2500rs - 72500 toman 3- stay in qom for 3 days in hotel - 3000rs - 87000 toman 4- transportation around qom - 1000rs - 29000toman 5- Go to Mashhad ( dont really know mode of transport and dont know the price but i guess should be overnight train) - 3 people 1500rs per person - 4500rs - 130,500 toman 6- Stay in Mashhad 4 days - 4000rs - 116,000 toman 7- Go to Tehran - 4500rs - 130,500 toman 8- Transportation around Tehran - 1000rs - 29000 toman 9- Food : 1000rs per day x 10 = 10000rs - 290,000 toman 10- Other expenses : 15000rs ( just in case dont really know where else would have to use them though) - 435,000 toman in total a rough estimate would be : 195500 pakistani rupees : excluding airflight ticket in Iran have to spend 50000rs i.e. 14,50,000 toman - is it a fair estimate or would it not be enough at all? salam peace and love
  5. salam brothers and sisters! im planning to take my mom with me to Iran for ziarat purposes. InshaAllah will do this next month if possible! Recently financially not so strong so trying to save a bit. Hope some of brithers and sisters would give me a complete advice and route trip. Its my first time to Iran and i dont really know except Imam Reza AS shrine thers any other shrine. So ill type in points whatever i want to know : 1- Names of shrines all over Iran. 2- Tickets price from Islamabad to Iran return ticket 3- Any agent or any other way to book the hotel in advance or list of hotels in cities where I should go for visiting and average price of the hotels there. 4- Means of transportation from one city to another 5- If possible then the complete route like for example which zyarat i should do first and which later. Which way would be cheaper! Thanks alot in advance brothers and sisters would be really glad if someone helps answer all questions Budget from Islamabad and back would be 2 lac for both persons, in total including flights hotel food and everything! Hope its enough! waiting for your kind replies Salam Live like Ali AS Die like Hussain AS
  6. salam brothers and sisters InshaAllah bu the Gods will ill be in China for long term and wanted to visit the holy shrines in Iran and stay there for around 10days I wanted to know that if any brother or sister have been to Iran from China or if any brother or sister have any knowledge about the routes and the trip and the flights and the total cost of the whole trip for 4 persons also i wanted to know if thers any any any brother or sister in China please contact me you can send me a message or add my wechat qq or email me wechat : wtf_5201314 qq : 2256300792 email : 2256300792@qq.com love and peace Live like Ali (as) Die like Hussain(as)
  7. “Tahrirolvasyleh” which Muslims probably don’t want you to know about Islam:A man can have sexual pleasure from a child as young as a baby. However, he should not penetrate vaginally, but sodomising the child is acceptable. If a man does penetrate and damage the child then, he should be responsible for her subsistence all her life. This girl will not count as one of his four permanent wives and the man will not be eligible to marry the girl’s sister… It is better for a girl to marry at such a time when she would begin menstruation at her husband’s house, rather than her father’s home. Any father marrying his daughter so young will have a permanent place in heaven. ["Tahrirolvasyleh", fourth edition, Qom, Iran, 1990]
  8. Salams Would appreciate your help in answering below questions with credible references. 1) Can someone refer me to Iran’s detailed laws regarding veil/hijab, specifically the punishment (official links will be quite helpful, if any)? 2) What is the basis of the punishment for not wearing proper dress code? Is it Islamic? Is it a specific law of Iran based on society’s preference? Or is a decision of the Supreme Leader of Iran? E.t.c 3) If it’s Islamic, can someone kindly share references used by law makers (are there any such Islamic references at all)? For example, were women punished for not covering themselves in the times of the Prophet P.b.u.H? Or did our Imams endorse the punishment for not observing hijab? 4) If it’s based on society’s preference, can someone clarify whether it was devised in consideration of the general consent of the (majority of) public and/or its representatives? 5) There are protestors seeking freedom to wear what they want. There are also protestors who want the government officials to strictly impose moral dress. Are there any official or third party statistics suggesting the majority view? 6) Are the punishments strictly carried out or do most people get away with a warning? Thank you
  9. Salaam all, I would like to travel to Iran from the US for pilgrimage and possibly tourism independently (not in a group but just a few family members) . I am getting conflicting information about the process. My understanding is I need someone (travel agent) in Iran to get approval for my family and me. Then I send that information to Washington. Is that correct? Can anyone provide assistance? Was salaam
  10. Mohammad Javad Zarif: Saudi Arabia’s Reckless Extremism THE world will soon celebrate the implementation of the landmark agreement that resolves the unnecessary, albeit dangerous, crisis overIran’s nuclear program. All parties hoped, and continue to believe, that the resolution of the nuclear issue would enable us to focus on the serious challenge of extremism that is ravaging our region — and the world. President Rouhani has repeatedly declared that Iran’s top foreign policy priority is friendship with our neighbors, peace and stability in the region and global cooperation, especially in the fight against extremism. In September 2013, a month after taking office, he introduced an initiative called World Against Violence and Extremism (WAVE). It was approved by consensus by the United Nations General Assembly, giving hope for a farsighted global campaign against terrorism. Unfortunately, some countries stand in the way of constructive engagement. Following the signing of the interim nuclear deal in November 2013, Saudi Arabia began devoting its resources to defeating the deal, driven by fear that its contrived Iranophobia was crumbling. Today, some in Riyadh not only continue to impede normalization but are determined to drag the entire region into confrontation. Photo Demonstrators opposed to Saudi Arabia gathered in Tehran on Friday.CreditAbedin Taherkenareh/European Pressphoto Agency Saudi Arabia seems to fear that the removal of the smoke screen of the nuclear issue will expose the real global threat: its active sponsorship of violent extremism. The barbarism is clear. At home, state executioners sever heads with swords, as in the recent execution of 47 prisoners in one day, including Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, a respected religious scholar whodevoted his life to promoting nonviolence and civil rights. Abroad, masked men sever heads with knives. Let us not forget that the perpetrators of many acts of terror, from the horrors of Sept. 11 to the shooting in San Bernardino and other episodes of extremist carnage in between, as well as nearly all members of extremist groups like Al Qaeda and the Nusra Front, have been either Saudi nationals or brainwashed by petrodollar-financed demagogues who have promoted anti-Islamic messages of hatred and sectarianism for decades. The Saudi strategy to derail the nuclear agreement and perpetuate — and even exacerbate — tension in the region has three components: pressuring the West; promoting regional instability through waging war in Yemen and sponsoring extremism; and directly provoking Iran. Riyadh’s military campaign in Yemen and its support for extremists are well known. Provocations against Iran have not grabbed international headlines, primarily thanks to our prudent restraint. The Iranian government at the highest level unequivocally condemned the assault against the Saudi embassy and consulate in Tehran on Jan. 2, and ensured the safety of Saudi diplomats. We took immediate measures to help restore order to the Saudi diplomatic compound and declared our determination to bring perpetrators to justice. We also took disciplinary action against those who failed to protect the embassy and have initiated an internal investigation to prevent any similar event. By contrast, the Saudi government or its surrogates have over the past three years directly targeted Iranian diplomatic facilities in Yemen, Lebanon and Pakistan — killing Iranian diplomats and locals. There have been other provocations, too. Iranian pilgrims in Saudi Arabia have endured systematic harassment — in one case, Saudi airport officers molested two Iranian boys in Jeddah, fueling public outrage. Also, Saudi negligence was to blame for the stampede during the recent hajj, which left 464 Iranian pilgrims dead. Moreover, for days, Saudi authorities refused to respond to requests from grieving families and the Iranian government to access and repatriate the bodies. This is not to mention the routine practice of hate speech not only against Iran but against all Shiite Muslims by Saudi Arabia’s government-appointed preachers. The outrageous beheading recently of Sheikh Nimr was immediately preceded by a sermon of hatred toward Shiites by a Grand Mosque preacher in Mecca, who last year said that “our disagreement with Shiites will not be removed, nor our suicide to fight them” as long as Shiites remained on the earth. Throughout these episodes, Iran, confident of its strength, has refused to retaliate or break — or even downgrade — diplomatic relations with Saudi Arabia. We have until now responded with restraint; but unilateral prudence is not sustainable. Iran has no desire to escalate tension in the region. We need unity to confront the threats posed by extremists. Ever since the first days after his election, the president and I have indicated publicly and privately our readiness to engage in dialogue, promote stability and combat destabilizing extremism. This has fallen on deaf ears in Saudi Arabia. The Saudi leadership must now make a choice: They can continue supporting extremists and promoting sectarian hatred; or they can opt to play a constructive role in promoting regional stability. We hope that reason will prevail. Mohammad Javad Zarif is the foreign minister of the Islamic Republic of Iran. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/11/opinion/mohammad-javad-zarif-saudi-arabias-reckless-extremism.html?_r=0
  11. (salam) In spite of the fact that Nawaz Sharief is considered puppet of Saudi Arab and Saudi Arab helped him a lot in his personal capacity, Pakistan is only providing assurance for support for Saudi Arab if its integrity is endangered. What Saudi Arab was/is/will be expecting is that Pakistan send its troops in Saudi Arab for fight against Yemen Houthi group and other enemies of Saudi regime. It is good that in spite of so much international pressure Pakistan has chosen its way intelligently and refused to be part of any international game. The drama of Islamic coalition forces was made to trap countries like Pakistan to force them to work for Saudi regime but amazingly a wise decision from Pakistan came that Pakistan is with the integrity of Saudi Arab but not with the Saudi Arab regime.
  12. UNITED NATIONS, United States: (AFP) - UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warned Friday that the use of cluster bombs in Yemen by the Saudi-led coalition may amount to war crimes. Ban said he had received "troubling reports" of cluster bomb attacks on January 6 on the rebel-held capital Sanaa. "The use of cluster munitions in populated areas may amount to a war crime due to their indiscriminate nature," the UN chief said in a statement. Cluster bombs are banned under a 2008 international convention, although Saudi Arabia and the United States are not signatories. The office of the UN high commissioner for human rights said Tuesday that its staff in Yemen had found remnants of 29 cluster bombs during a field visit in Haradh district in the northwest. The warning over possible war crimes was a clear sign of mounting frustration at the UN with Saudi Arabia s 10-month military campaign in Yemen. It came in response to the decision by Yemen s Saudi-backed government to expel the leading UN rights official, George Abu al-Zulof. Ban is urging the Yemeni government to reverse its decision to expel Zulof, who was declared persona non grata for an alleged lack of impartiality in his reporting. The UN chief said he was "deeply concerned about the intensification of coalition airstrikes and ground fighting and shelling in Yemen, despite repeated calls for a renewed cessation of hostilities." He is "particularly concerned about reports of intense airstrikes in residential areas and on civilian buildings in Sanaa, including the Chamber of Commerce, a wedding hall and a centre for the blind," said the statement. UN envoy Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed was in Riyadh on Friday for talks on renewing a ceasefire in Yemen, which faces the threat of famine amid the dire humanitarian crisis. Yemen descended into chaos when the coalition began airstrikes in March to push back Iran-backed Huthi rebels who had seized Sanaa. More than 5,800 people have been killed and 27,000 wounded since then, according to UN figures. Yemen s government sat down with the rebels and their allies in Switzerland last month for six days of talks that ended with no major breakthrough. The UN envoy has called for a new round of talks on January 14 but the sides have yet to confirm that they will attend. http://dunyanews.tv/en/World/316821-UN-warns-cluster-bomb-use-in-Yemen-may-amount-to-w
  13. If war happened between Iran and Saudi Arabia who would have the advantage?
  14. Salam alaykum... Im from Malaysia, planning to further my study in tehran university and move my family there... any idea if can buy house/apartment there? Need some insight on the matter... tq
  15. Assalam-o-Alekum, URL: Google Playstore: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.vanguardmatrix.zaair Website: http://thepilgrimseries.com/ Introducing an app for all momineen to tour Ziaraats either from home or can use this app as a utility on their journey to Iran, Iraq and Syria. Zaair Guide Guide is an App for those who wish to learn and explore Ziaraat in Iran, Iraq and Syria. Locate Ziaarat in any of the three countries, listen to audio recitals or read the text in Arabic, transliteration in Roman Script and English. Estimate walking or driving directions to Ziaraat and important Landmarks from any location. Learn about the history of Ziaraat, The Imams, important Personalities and historic events. It is a must have App for Pilgrims and Zawwar (Zaair) who wish to travel to the historic places in Iran, Iraq and Syria especially for those travelling for Arbaeen. Some of the key features are listed below: Locate Ziaraat in Iran, Iraq and Syria. Find out about Ziaraat and their locations, which are not known to many people. Listen to audio recitals includingDua, Prayers, and Ziaraat. Read the text of recitals in Arabic, transliteration in Roman Script and English. Learn about the History of Ziaraat, The Imams, important Personalities and historic events. Qibla Compass Weather Report Namaz Timings Calendar of Islamic Dates Advance Search feature.
  16. Team Melli Fan Thread In this thread, we can have a discussion and share news and thoughts about Team Melli (Iranian Football Team) and where us fans can show our passion and loyalty to the team! Team Melli has been one of the most successful teams in Asian football, where they play within the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and they have played in 4 World Cups. The home stadium of the team is at Azadi Stadium in Tehran, which is one the biggest stadiums in the World! One of the most successful players for the team has been the legendary player Ali Daei, who has the most goals in international football at a record 109 goals and he has played for notable European teams such as Bayern Munich and Hertha BSC. Lets show our Team Melli pride!
  17. Salaamun aleykum, I've recently had the problem to finding muslim people during the travel to other countries , I decided to help people traveling to Iran, specially those who traveling for ziyarat. Anyone who wants to travel to Iran (I live in tehran but I can help you about Qom and mashhad too ) I'll be glad to help about Finding/reserving Hotel, Touring around the city and ... . just contact me :)
  18. Is there a Tauzeeh-ul-Masail of Ayatullah Khamenei (online or otherwise)? I have heard that he has not published or translated it???? The only thing I can find on the Net is Question and Answer books. How is someone to be a Muqallid of Aga Khamenei without an actual comprehensive Tauzeeh-ul-Masail, rather than these crummy Q&A books? This is the closest thing I've found so far: http://www.islam-pure.de/imam/fatwas/practical00.htm Thanks in Advance
  19. (bismillah) , (salam) "Iranians are converting to Christianity"," Iranians are becoming Sunni's", "Iranian government covertly serves Wahabi interests"," Sunnis are living under dire conditions in Iran", "Iran kills Shia scholars", "Women are being oppressed", "Christians are being persecuted", "There is no freedom of speech in Iran", "Khamenei possesses country's wealth", " Khomeini issued a fatwa that…", … These are just some examples, out of many, of things that are being heard in the media about Iran, its people, government and situation on a daily basis; some of them exaggerated, some distorted and some fabricated. While I know when members here raise the mentioned instances, it is just to know the truth, and there would be no issue whatsoever with creating topics and asking certain questions about Iranian government and people or criticizing them. And while I know people, at least in most of the cases, ask these questions with good intentions and this is appreciable, but at the same time, these can show how the propaganda machine of the Media -- the fabricator and initiator of these stories -- against Iran works. The article below is talking about one case out of this stream in Media: Read the whole article here.
  20. The End of Israel -Novel- Please Comment & Like Settings: Palestine, Israel, Iran, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Turkey, The United States... Period: 1990's - 2020's Themes: Occupation, Geopolitics, Armed Conflict, Religious Tension The main character through the novel is Muhammed, a Palestinian. We start with his childhood and follow him well into his adulthood. Many other characters appear and play crucial roles in his life. Some scenes contain a moderate degree of violence representative of and to be expected of the topic matter. Be warned. “If you will it, it is no dream.” –Theodor Herzl 1902 Chapter 1 Suffering “It was September 2nd, 1991. We had intended to go to Beit Hanoun Hospital, a doctor and nurse could have helped her through labor and received the infant, put him in an incubator, monitor them, and everything that normal deliveries entail in the world. Our ambulance driver sped as fast as he could, taking us flying over bumps, rattling us through potholes, throwing us on sharp turns, jolting us at sudden stops and swerving to get around traffic and pedestrians. Our driver did his best to get her into real medical care, but we were stopped at an IDF checkpoint. At first he assured us that we would be waived through, but the soldiers manning the checkpoint blared at him not to come closer. He put the ambulance in brake, got out and pleaded with them shouting that he had a pregnant woman. They blared back, told him to turn around and not to come closer or they would fire. He offered to let them search the ambulance, his passengers, and himself… again they told him to return. They shouted that if he didn’t go, they would fire and then search the van after. My sister poked her leg out of the van, readying to present herself as proof we were harmless. Just the sight of the rear of the ambulance opening provoked the Israelis into panicked shouting on their megaphones, maybe three of them at once, ‘Get back in the vehicle, don’t come out, go back!’. The driver said that he would turn around, but that he would leave his pregnant passenger with them if they would give her over to a medic, or be generous enough to take her to a doctor. Their patience was gone, ‘Go back, leave nothing behind, we’ll fire if you’re not gone in 20 seconds, final warning’. The driver hurried back into the ambulance, he drove just out of sight of the checkpoint, we didn’t have time to take her to a hospital by some other route. He thought quick, parked, ran to a stranger’s home and asked them if he could bring a woman in labor inside. They obliged but my sister wouldn’t move from the van. Instead that family we’d never met brought towels and blankets, water bottles, and then crawled into the back of the ambulance and helped her through.” - Nadirah Zaqarna, Muhammed Al Filistini’s maternal aunt “And so it was in this way that one child, in a city of children, was birthed. To an ancient land, to a holy land, torn by strife and broken by poverty. In that not so special place he was birthed, nobody renown to note it and the incomprehensible import. The world remained totally unaware who had entered it, the gravity of him, the immensity of him. In his first gasp, his first cry, the heavens were electrified, deities sang in ecstasy and in agony. Humanity did not feel his presence, but it would. With all certainty, yes, surely and most painfully, it would feel him in time.” It’s been a decade since Muhammed, once just a faceless young boy from Gaza City, reshaped the geopolitical, religious, and cultural scene of his region and the globe. In putting together our investigative piece on his legacy we’ve followed his footsteps right from his very beginning. Talking to neighbors and family in modern day Gaza, collecting old photographs, we’ve learned that Muhammed’s father, Khalil Suleiman, was in brief a short and skinny man with lean sinewy limbs. His hands were veiny and thick with discolored knuckles and rough calluses on his palms. In the heat he wore the same white tank top for days, and he kept his face shaved but for a dark mustache and the occasional stubble along his jaw and chin. His hair was always close cropped, his eyes were always tired, and his back was increasingly sore. Supporting a family and surviving through the duration of the 1st Intifada, Suleiman was the quiet man who’s normally out making connections and following leads. He’d had so many gigs since he was a small boy that even he couldn’t count or recall them fully. He was an expert at most anything requiring a screwdriver, a hammer, a saw, and he was helpful and ready to go, ready to follow instructions and work for many, many hours without break, without checking the time, without complaint and without slowing down. He worked at fishing docks, on fishing boats, in orchards. He’d driven delivery trucks and manned warehouses, he’d worn a hardhat and worked out of a toolbox. Suleiman had been dirty and worn, he had heat stroke more than once and he’d woken up many mornings too sore to move his body and too penniless to rest it through. Speaking to Muhammed’s older sister in Amman Jordan, Shiyam Wahdan, “As physically and mentally exhausted as our father was, he always had time for Muhammed. He bathed, dressed, and fed Muhammed as a baby. He carried Muhammed on his shoulders, ran with him in his arms, tickled him, played ball with him. Our father would have only a moment to rest, after long hours at back breaking work before he’d have to return to another, often more bodily taxing work. To have a precious twenty minutes with his small son roused him, removed the weariness from his face. Every boy’s hero is his father, the strongest man in the world and the smartest and the protector against all things bad. So it was in Muhammed’s eyes then." She continued, "Our father had a job were he repaired boats, mostly fishing. The business was run by a friend of his cousin’s. Israeli impositions and restrictions on the Gazan coast took their toll on the industry and he was periodically laid off, accepted reduced wages, or even accepted other means of payment in lieu of a salary; favors, supplies, fuel. He was at home by himself when the IDF made a ground incursion. A smoke grenade was hurled into our window, he ran to the door so that he could get out but just as he reached for the doorknob Israeli soldiers kicked it in, smashing his hand and his face and sending him tumbling over. They detained him while they searched our apartment, but apparently, of course, they had the wrong address. They didn’t apologize to him, they didn’t talk, they tore through everything and then they were out. Muhammed was the first to come home. He was very little then, he hadn’t been in school but for a few months perhaps. He found the door broken in, everything thrown about and tipped over, emptied drawers, clothes wadded in a great mess over displaced furniture, the rug rolled up, cushions slashed open, cabinets open and their contents spilled out. Muhammed found our father trying to get the plastic wrist binding off with a small kitchen knife but he couldn’t do it himself. Little Muhammed was the one who had to cut it. With his little hands he had to cut his papa’s restraints, telling him to be steady and careful, he freed his father like an escaped criminal. Small boys have their hero; father. Their father protects the home and he’s invincible. Then what humiliation it was to be found that way, helpless and the home ruined, violated, and all imaginings of security and guardianship dashed.” Not more than a year after that incident, “Our father was going to see an acquaintance about a job. He was walking when an Israeli Army convoy passed on the street ahead of him. When an Israeli convoy went through they went fast, they didn’t want an engagement. Sometimes going fast didn’t help. He waited for the convoy to pass, but on that day it was ambushed by resistance fighters. They called themselves that, and that’s the closest to real guerrillas there were. To be honest they weren’t really resistance fighters, they were young guys with a single Molotov cocktail. But a little fire can frighten a troop of elephants into a stampede, into a charge. That Molotov came over a low wall, or from a roof top, or from a breezeway, or from a parked car, or from somewhere… but it came and shattered all over the windshield of an Israeli military supply truck. The convoy stopped, and unable to discern the location of their attackers, the Israeli soldiers raised their rifles and fired indiscriminately, into windows, at rooftops, into breezeways, into cars. My father was shot through the upper-spine as he turned to take cover in a shop. He fell so fast and heavy he twisted his wrist and busted his chin open on the pavement. He was paralyzed where he lay. But for sowing him up, there was no surgery, nothing to remove... it flew in and it flew out. He had an x-ray, I saw it along with the whole family. Between his shoulder blades was a mess of broken spinal bone fragments, and there was nothing to be done for that. After his doctor released him from the hospital, a week maybe, he didn’t leave his bed again.” Muhammed’s father was no longer an unbending man of strength and physical activity. “He needed to be cared for like an infant throughout the day and family would take turns waking in the night to attend to him. He was an adult man who drooled, he had diapers, he had bed sores and infections, he had atrophied muscles. His face was a loose hanging and absent wreck of the gruff but handsome face in the photos about our home. Muhammed’s father had ceased to exist, and there was only this guilt ridden burden, silent and unmoving, in his place. They had once prayed and bowed together, they couldn’t have that together from then on. Muhammed did not speak to him but when prompted to by our mother, and in a short time didn’t speak to him at all but when none were around.” Mrs. Wahdan showed us her father’s medical records, including his x-ray and the conclusion by his doctor that no surgical remedy was possible. In his concluding notes there was an expression of optimism that he might live ten or twelve years more. “We couldn’t afford new clothes, we couldn’t afford adequate food, and we lived off the charity of people almost as poor as we were. Muhammed was aware as anybody that was all due to the Israeli blockade. School was often cancelled, there were frequent riots and Israeli incursions. Dozens of Muhammed’s classmates and neighbors were maimed and killed in Israeli military actions. One of his friends was buried in the rubble of his home as an Israeli bomb flattened it. Another one of his friends was hit in the brain by shrapnel and was left mentally handicapped. Some lost limbs, others bore horrific scars. Men were dragged away to prison in front of everybody, homes were demolished as families stood and watched, orphans and young widows abounded. Muhammed learned, as we all did, that nothing good in Gaza lasts for long. You enjoy it while you have it, what little you have, because the Jews can take it and will take it whenever they like. In elementary school Muhammed had a friend named Hamid. They’d hold hands, play in stair wells, attempt tricks with a soccer ball. They shared the same classroom and sat together each day. While Hamid needed to be reminded and practiced several times before he mastered a chapter assigned by their teacher, Muhammed would read his textbook once and then recite it almost word for word, and then add his own thoughts. He’d read ahead because unanswered questions in the early chapters would be immediately apparent to him and in his curiosity he would follow through to the end to have his curiosity satisfied. Hamid was clever but envied the ease with which Muhammed ingested whatever the teacher sent him home with. Muhammed tried to help Hamid but when it became clear to him that Hamid would rather get the high test scores without the mental exertion, Muhammed didn’t think twice before he devised a way for his companion to cheat during the exam. Muhammed would come to the teacher before class and ask the teacher if he could take the test then, “I’ll stress over it all morning and I won’t focus during lecture time unless I can finish it now.” His teacher agreed, and in the span of the day and before the rest of the class took the test, Muhammed would teach the answers to Hamid. The teacher suspected nothing for several months until it became apparent that on days Muhammed didn’t take the test early Hamid’s scores were considerably lower. Having been scolded and dismissed after being made to clean the classroom they returned to their homes together. Hamid didn’t apologize or promise to make it up to him, because they didn’t consider themselves separate in the way that they could wrong or right one another. After a moment all of that, the teacher’s mean tone and posture that’s so intimidating to children, it seemed so distant and they began to enjoy their walk home, kicking their soccer ball along the sidewalk and joining a round of hajlah having come upon some classmates. Through with that, they set off to a soccer field together. If he hadn’t been one step behind it would’ve been Muhammed. His school friend turned the corner and in mid-sentence his head exploded, opened from the top like a blooming bright pink flower. An Israeli sniper in a guard tower had taken the shot assuming that whoever poked out from behind that building was a militant. It wasn’t a militant, it was a modest boy in velcro-strap shoes. It was Hamid. Muhammed didn’t cry, he returned home as he had been going, but with bits of brain and skull fragments stuck to the front of his shirt, a film of blood all down to his knees.” Muhammed came home before anybody else, his sister and father napping, his other sister staying late at school to study, his mother working endless hours. “He took off his shoes and set his soccer ball down between them. He walked so silently to retrieve a change of clothes, returned out the door to the bathroom at the back of the building, and he washed himself as he’d wash himself if it were mud that had been splashed on him. And that was it. No more friend, wash him down the drain, the Jews took him, and that’s it. Our sister Mina cared for our father and Muhammed while our mother worked. We’d heard the news that Hamid had been killed but it was days before anybody realized Muhammed was with him when it happened. It was Mina who, while prodding Muhammed on the matter, discovered that. She cried, he didn’t. She promised that she’d protect him, she’d escort him to and from school, she’d talk to him each day, that he wasn’t alone anymore. And she did that for some time, a year or so. She learned his daily occurrences, checked his homework though he needed no checking, and she tended the scuffs and s[Edited Out]s he’d get from playing rough with other boys. She not only cooked for him, shopped for him, and monitored him, she spoke to him and learned him. Mina was the somebody in his family who knew who his favorite soccer players were, that he liked to play the forward position, and that he wanted to be a police chief or to be in charge of security detail for an important person when he grew up. She learned that he liked martial arts movies and that his humor was of the oddly mature sort that notes nuanced absurdities like a dentist who hates his patients or a business owner who won’t eat at his own restaurant. What happened to our sister? Our sister Mina was riding in a shuttle bus. It was taking her home after a day in school. A few cars ahead there was a motorcycle, and riding on the back of that motorcycle was a man who’d been identified for cash by an Israeli informant as a Libyan trained explosives expert they were hunting. An Israeli helicopter fired a rocket on him and it hit its target. The suddenness of the strike in fast traffic caused accidents. A farmer in his fruit truck delivering to a market rear-ended my sister’s shuttle bus. She was sitting in the back seat with her friend memorizing math formulas. She flew forward and bounced off the ceiling, landing just by the driver’s seat. Her wrist was broken, her cheekbone cracked, and she received a concussion bruising her visual cortex such that she was blinded for life. Muhammed loved and needed his father. In keeping with his character, he was full of brotherliness toward Hamid. But Mina’s suffering was a new sort. Hamid was beyond this world. Stuck between four walls, so was his father. Mina was still alive, fully, the same girl inside… but from then until forever she’d be handicapped and ruined. In Muhammed’s heart that was worse, and she made it worse for him by trying to do everything the same as she did it before. Blind, she still tended to her paralyzed father… moving and functioning by memory. She still walked him to school and back, blind. Mina still listened to his daily happenings while making meals for us. Muhammed watched her do these things as he had watched her do them before, and it was an assault on his sanity that now she did those things without eyes… staring blankly, moving clumsily, for him and the rest of us. Our mother and I pleaded with Mina to stop, day after day and week after week, we told her she was excused from those duties, that it wasn’t her fault. She persisted. One morning she was caught between cleaning our father, making a breakfast, and trying to finish her own homework. Muhammed tried to sneak out the door to school without her following. She sensed that he had gone and went out after him, calling for him to wait. He marched forward and she followed after him. She stumbled on a curb and fell into a table where a pair of old men were having their tea. Muhammed turned back, with tears in his eyes, the only time I saw tears in his eyes, and screamed at her there for everybody to witness, “Go home, I don’t need you now! Go home!” and he ran. When he was an elementary age boy he prized school and dedicated teachers because it wasn’t something he could take for granted. However, after our father’s injury and without that paternal discipline and our mother always away at work, not only could he miss school without any real immediate consequence, he didn’t have any hope for it either. After all, he told our mother when she first learned that he was absent for a whole week, “If I go to my classes or if I don’t go to them, when I’m grown we’ll still be in Gaza, Hamid will still be dead, father will still be paralyzed, and Mina will still be blind. How well I study won’t lessen what we suffer now, nor prevent what we’ll suffer later.” Our mother had no response for him then, but she remembered his words and she’d have her response." -End of Chapter 1- I'm eager for feedback. This novel is finished and has 12 Chapters. I'll add more chapters soon... Thank You!
  21. One of the things I have noticed living in the West, an issue I have wondering a lot about lately is the irreligion of many diaspora Iranians where many of them have practising Muslims relatives in Iran such as their parents and grandparents. Many I have come around are unreligious and dishonour their Muslim heritage where many have become Agnostic and Atheist, where this seems very contrasting to todays Iran which we hear a lot about on the news and think of as a religious country. From my experience a lot of diaspora Iranians have a negative image of Islam cause of recent historical events such as the 1979 Iranian Revolution where Iran became a more strictly practising Muslim country, where the current regime have became more controlling of peoples private lives and also unrelated events to do with Iran such as 9/11 and the other infamous events and things associated with Islam and Muslims. I feel the current theocracy of the Iran, has created a negative image of Islam for many dissuaded Iranians especially the younger generation who seek more freedoms and opportunities. The government in Iran has created an unwanted backlash and also misunderstand against Islam especially among those mostly living in Western countries in Europe, North America and including Australia. So far books and article have been written by Iranians in the West, and speak of Islam as a backward faith, opposed to freedom and modernity and speak harshly of the Arabs who invaded there homeland many centuries ago and bought an extreme barbaric ideology which took away there supposed freedoms and there great Persian culture. Many of them have suggested choosing so called "moderate" and "peaceful" religions such as Zoroastrianism and Christianity, where a clear-eyed examination suggest all religions have positive or negative seeming aspects. Its not difficult to find verses to do with the perpetration of violence in the Bible, to justify there unfair justifications against Islam. As far as compatibility of Islam with advancement and Iranian culture is concerned, one should remember the many great Medieval Iranian thinkers, writers and scientists who helped established the modern foundations of thought, literature and science all came from within the great Islamic Civilization. If Islam has any hope of truly being worshipped by diaspora Iranians it must then be freed from the control of the government of Iran, who have done so many wrongs and abuses under the name of Islam and whose policies do not provide for the freedoms and liberties of Iranians.
  22. (salam) I have never gone in Iran but my friends, my relatives and even my brother speaks about bad behavior of Iranians with Pakistanis. What is reason behind it? My brother told me that he was present at Harm of Syeda Zainab a.s and was sitting alone on a cornder covering his face and shedding tears when an Iranian (who appeared from his facial features to be iranian) came there and started pushing him away while there was no one. He kept on saying "Yala, Yala" (Run from here). My brother said he was very annoyed by this rude behavior of Iranians. He said Iranians have complete hold in the Shrine of Bibi Zainab a.s and they treat Pakistanis realy bad. Similarly, my maternal uncle who was martyred by terrorits also visited Iran and told that Iranians do not treat Pakistanis well. If you ask me i am Shia and i love every Shia in the world to whatsoever race he belongs to. But i am quite surprised to know this behavior of Iranians with Pakistanis. Is this the major reason of Iran's not concerning Shia killings in Pakistan? Pakistan is hub of Shia killing in the world after Iraq. But Iran never raised any voice ont his. Yet iran is concerned with Palestinian issue or issue of Syria but you can slaughter the whole Shia generation in Pakistan, Iran will continue its so called "harmony among muslims" policy at EVERY COST.
  23. This is an open letter from Numerous Sunni Ulemah to Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi declaring him as Kharji and the actions of this satanic army to be totally against Islam; I was actually amazed to read the hadith of Imam Ali (KAW) from Sunni narrations in the end where Imam has so eloquently described these Khwarij. http://www.lettertobaghdadi.com/ There is an executive Summary but then there is detailed explanation. A mush read for all if I could recommend. You can also Google Letter to Al Baghdadi and get to the subject matter.
  24. بسم الله الرحمن الرحیم سلام علیکم "A few days ago, the most popular program of the IRIB (Iran Broadcasting) at the time named mah asal also was dedicated to Afghan migrants and there a new image of these migrants was represented for Iranian people. A TV series named "My home Afghanistan" is being produced which is about Afghan's students and will be broadcasted soon. The movie "Mazar Sharif" which will represent an honorable and of course incomplete image of Afghans will be released in the coming weeks. The TV documentaries about Afghan migrants are being aired one after another and positive changes in the News Agencies, newspapers and magazines from where the changes begin still go on." Translated from the link below: http://www.rajanews.com/news/218415 http://www.telewebion.com/fa/1319835/%D9%82%D8%B3%D9%85%D8%AA-90-_%D9%85%D9%87%D8%A7%D8%AC%D8%B1%DB%8C%D9%86-%D8%A7%D9%81%D8%BA%D8%A7%D9%86%D8%B3%D8%AA%D8%A7%D9%86%DB%8C-%D9%85%DB%8C%D9%87%D9%85%D8%A7%D9%86-%D8%A8%D8%B1%D9%86%D8%A7%D9%85%D9%87-%D8%AE%D9%86%D8%AF%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%86%D9%87/%D8%AE%D9%86%D8%AF%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%86%D9%87.html
  25. ive heard from someone, in some hadith it is said "On the authority of Thawban, the Messenger of Allah (upon whom be blessings and peace) said:The Prophet Sallallahu ‘Alaihi Wa Sallam said: "Before your treasure, three will kill each other -- all of them are sons of a different caliph but none will be the recipient. Then the Black Banners will appear from the East and they will kill you in a way that has never before been done by a nation." Thawban, said: 'Then he said something that I do not remember by heart' then continued to say that the Prophet, praise and peace be upon him, said: "If you see him give him your allegiance, even if you have to crawl over ice, because surely he is the Caliph of Allah, the Mahdi. If you see the black flags coming from Khurasan, join that army, even if you have to crawl over ice, for this is the army of the Caliph, the Mahdi and no one can stop that army until it reaches Jerusalem." Can someone clarify me on this Hadith and which one it is? Do you think the Mahdi will be from Afghanistan?, and what do you think " the black flags of Khurasan"?
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